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1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page

Biographies in the
Atlas Map of Jersey County, Illinoisby Andreas, Lyter & Co., Davenport, IA, 1872

Augustus K. VAN HORNE, M. D., was born in Scoharie county, New York, April 2, 1831. He is the youngest child of Col. Elijah and Polly Van Horne, who were both natives of New York. Mrs. Van Horne was a daughter of Joseph Wyckoff. Their ancestors on both sides were Scotch, English, and Holland Dutch. In October, 1833, Col. Van Horne removed, with his family, to the present limits of Jersey county. Early in life he became a member of a militia regiment in his native state, and was promoted from the rank of ensign to that of colonel of a cavalry regiment. He resigned that position in order to accept the office of sheriff. He was subsequently defeated in that county for the same office by the anti-masonic organization.
     Dr. Van Horne received his literary education principally in the common schools of Jersey county, and when about twenty years of age commenced reading medicine in the office of Drs. Charles and Augustus Knapp, of Jerseyville. He attended his first course of medical lectures at McDowell’s College, St. Louis, in the winter of 1853-4, and afterwards took a course at the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia. He received a diploma for that institution in March, 1856, though previous to graduating he had practiced medicine in Greene county, being located about eight miles west of Carrollton. In April 1856 he located at Jerseyville, since which time he has had a lucrative practice. In October 1859 he was married to Miss Elizabeth Bacon, daughter of J. Murry Bacon, an old resident of Jersey county. Dr. Van Horne and wife have five children. Politically, in early life he became a member of the democratic party, to which he has since strictly adhered. Dr. Van Horne has for several years been recognized as among the prominent physicians in this portion of the state.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Elijah VAN HORNE was born in Coumbia county, New York, February 20, 1786. He received his education in the district schools of his native county. When quite young he learned the carpenter trade, and when about the age of twenty-five he was elected sheriff of Scoharie county, N. Y., and filled that position three years. When twenty years of age he was married to Miss Polly Wyckoff, daughter of John and Jane Wyckoff. Mr. Van Horne and wife had a family of ten children, five of whom are yet living. In 1838 (1833?) he removed, with his family, to Illinois, purchasing a farm in Jersey county, township 7, range 11, where his son, James S., now resides. He acquired a comfortable home, having a farm of near four hundred acres of the best land in the county. During the time he lived in Jersey county he was a prominent man, politically and otherwise. He was always a strong advocate of the principles of the democratic party. He was also an honorable member of the order of the “mystic tie,” and at times was sent as a delegate to New York and other places. He died at his residence March 28, 1868, and was buried with masonic honors. Mrs. Van Horne survived his death until June 14, 1871.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Josiah VAUGHN was born in Madison county, Illinois, December 5, 1822. He is the youngest child of Josiah and Polly Ann Vaughn. Josiah Vaughn was a native of Kentucky. He first settled in Illinois about ten years before it was a state. Josiah, jr., the subject of this ketch, was married March 12, 1846, to Miss Mary, daughter of Solomon and Rebecca Pruitt. (Solomon was the son of Martin P., who was one of the early settlers of western Illinois.) Josiah Vaughn, sr., had eight children, six sons and two daughters, all now deceased except the subject of this sketch and Elizabeth, wife of John Brown, now residing in Arkansas. He died at this residence, six miles southeast of Alton, in the fall of 1823; his wife died also at the same residence in the spring of 1846. She was the daughter of John and Betsey Huitt, who were natives of South Carolina. They resided a short time in Georgia, when, in the fall of 1803 [1808?], they settled about six miles northwest of the present site of Edwardsville, Madison county, Ill. Two of his family of eight children are still living, viz: John Huitt, residing about five miles northeast of Carrollton, Ill., and Betsey, relict of Mathew R. Cowan, one of the pioneer settlers of Jersey county, who first settled where his wife now resides, in township 9, range 10, in 1822.
     Josiah Vaughn has had a family of eleven children, eight sons and three daughters, all deceased except four sons. The are in the following order of birth, viz: Josiah, jr., James, Charles, and Edward, residing with their parents. Mr. Vaughn, after his marriage, settled on the farm where he has since resided. A lithographic view of his farm residence appears elsewhere in this work. [See
1872 Farms & Residences]

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Dr. James B. VEITCH was born in the county of Kent, England, October 23, 1816. He received his early education in his native country, and his classical course at Eaton College. He went through his medical studies in the University College of London, from which he graduated in July, 1837. He emigrated to this country in the spring of 1838, and settled in Jersey county in the fall of the same year. He first settled in township 7, range 13; about one year after he removed to the next township east (range 12), and commenced the practice of his profession in the neighborhood called Lofton’s Prairie, where he continued till the summer of 1848, when he removed to Grafton, where he now resides. In July, 1844, he was married to Miss Marilda McDow, whose history see elsewhere in this work. He has had by this union nine children, two sons and seven daughters, of whom four are deceased. His oldest living daughter, Maria, is the wife of Thomas A. Reeves, of West Virginia. Dr. Veitch is one of the oldest and most prominent physicians now living in the county. He is a gentleman of fine literary tastes and high scholastic attainments. He is high appreciated in the community in which he has so long been an active and useful citizen.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


George W. WARE was born in Westminster, Worcester county, Massachusetts, June 30th, 1836. He settled in Jerseyville in the spring of 1855, and there engaged in the sale of drugs and medicines, as one of the firm of White & Ware, which co-partnership was formed on the 1st of January, 1856. He continued in the firm until 1859, when he became the sole proprietor, in which capacity he still continues the same business. The establishment which he now represents was first formed in 1846, being the first drug store in the county. His present large and commodious building was erected in 1867. He is now offering a large stock in his line, having added books, stationary, and wall paper, which form an important interest in the commercial transactions of Jersey county. Mr. Ware is too well known throughout the county to require eulogy of us. It is enough to say that, by strict attention to business and unswerving integrity, he has built up an enduring reputation and won the confidence of a large circle of friends and patrons, with whom he has associated and had dealings for over sixteen years.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Peyton C. WALKER, Esq., was born in London county, Virginia, October 22, 1811. He is the youngest child of a family of seven children of Daniel and Elizabeth Walker, who were likewise natives of the “Old Dominion.” He was a soldier in the army during the war of 1812, and his father, John Walker, participated in many of the campaigns of the revolutionary struggle. He served in the army about seven years, fighting bravely to secure American liberty. Mr. Daniel Walker and wife both died in London county, Virginia. They were of English descent. The subject of this sketch received his early education in the schools of Portsmouth, Ohio, where his parents resided for a few years. When about seventeen years of age Mr. Walker commenced to learn the carpenter’s trade, which business he followed for about twenty-five years. On the 13th of April, 1835, he left Ohio forIllinois, on a steamboat, and was thirteen days in making the trip. He settled in Alton about the middle of May, where he resumed his former business. On the first of June, 1837, Mr. .W. was married to Miss Laura L. Parker, step-daughter of Mr. N. L. Adams, of Jerseyville. They have had a family of eleven children, of whom seven are yet living, six sons and one daughter. After his marriage, Mr. W. resided in Alton till the fall of 1838, when he removed to Jerseyville. He constructed the first church in Jerseyville. Mr. Walker and wife were the first couple married in the village of Jerseyville. In the spring of 1839 he moved on the land which he had previously purchased, about one and a-half miles south of the present county seat, where he made considerable improvement. In the springof 1850 he sold that farm and then settled on the farm where he nowresides. For many years he has followed agricultural pursuits, in which he has been successful in accumulating a comfortable competence. When Mr. W. commenced life on his own account, he was quite poor, but being industrious he succeeded in overcoming those obstacles. Having in early life learned the lessons of frugality and economy, he could not be otherwise than successful. He is now ranked among the good farmers of the county. Mr. Walker, besides adding to the material wealth of the county, has raised a large and intelligent family. He has given his sons the benefits of a collegiate education; two of them are married. His eldest son, George F. Walker, was a soldier in one of the cavalry regiments of Illinois volunteers, and was wounded in a skirmish at Augusta, Arkansas, and in consequence of debility received an honorable discharge and returned to his home. His daughter, Mary M, was educated principally in the select schools of Jerseyville. Mr. Walker quite early in life became a member of the Baptist church; and in consequence of his anti-slavery sentiments, the officers of the church being of “proslavery views,” to use his own expression, he was turned out for the only crime of being a man opposed to slavery and a friend of universal freedom. After that occurrence in the church, many of the anti slavery members withdrew. Mr. W., with other gentlemen of this county, was an active worker on what was termed the “underground railroad,” in assisting the slaves farther north. Mr. Walker in early life became a member of the Whig party, his first vote being cast for Henry Clay. He also voted twice for Abraham Lincoln, and is still a strong supporter of the Republican party. During the late rebellion, few, if any, of the citizens of this county, were stronger supporters of the Union cause than Mr. Walker. In his veins yet runs the blood of his grandfather, who fought valiantly in that immortal struggle of ’76, and it was reserved for him to defend, through his son, the flag of American liberty, in the great civil strife of 1860. Mr. Walker has long since been recognized as among the leaders of the Republican party inJersey county, and is a man who is highly respected by those who haveacted with him for over thirty years.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Dr. Jonas Lutellas WARD, the third of a family of six children, was born in Licking county, Ohio, November 29th, 1821. His parents, Jonas and Elizabeth Ward, were natives of Virginia. Mrs. Ward was of French descent, and her ancestors came to America from France with the ancestors of Francis Marion. Mr. Ward was of English extraction. Both of the grandfathers of the Doctor were soldiers in the revolutionary war — his grandfather Ward was wounded at the memorable battle of Yorktown, and his grandfather Dewees was with Washington’s patriotic band at Valley Forge, and, from the excessive colds of that winter, lost a portion of his foot. The Doctor’s father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and is now residing in Story county, Iowa. Mrs. Ward died on the 4th of May, 1872. Dr. J. L. Ward received his early education in the schools of Newark, Ohio, and when about twenty-one years of age commenced the study of medicine, in the office of Dr. Cooper. He attended lectures at the Ohio Medical College, at Cincinnati, in the winter of 1846-7, and in the spring of 1848 he received his diploma, though he had practiced previous to graduating. In 1849 he became a resident of Crawford county, Illinois, where he practiced medicine about seven years, and afterwards moved to Clay county. In 1859 Dr. Ward settled at Fielding, in Jersey county, where he remained until 1867, when he removed to Brussels, Calhoun county. In the fall of 1871 he again became a resident of Jersey county, this time locating in Jerseyville, where he has enjoyed a good practice. While living in Crawford county, he was married to Mrs. Margaretta Selby. They have had five children. Dr. Ward is a skillful and successful physician, and a genial and courteous gentleman.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Note: _?_ indicates an unreadable word or words

Hon. George E. WARREN was born in Sciota county, Ohio, August 16, 1817. When about one year old his parents removed to Rhode Island. He is the second child of a family of two sons and on daughter, of Dr. Thomas and Martha De Wolfe Warren. On the paternal side the ancestral descent was English, and on the maternal, French. Dr. Warren was lineally descended from the Puritans. Mr. De Wolfe, Judge Warren’s grandfather, was the owner of the noted privateer “Yankee,” that figured in the war of 1812. Dr. Warren practiced his profession principally in Rhode Island. In 1835 he removed with his family to the present limits of Jersey county; his wife having previously died in Rhode Island in 1829. After coming to this State he entered considerable land. His death occurred at the residence of his son, Judge Warren. He was a gentleman of rather extensive literary culture. At the early age of fourteen the subject of this sketch became a student at Brown University, Rhode Island, where he attended a course of four years. In 1835 he came west with his father and sister, and immediately after commenced reading law in the office of Woodson & Hodges at Carrollton; at the same time he was deputy clerk of Greene county. He was admitted to the bar of the city of Alton in the spring of 18??; practiced there a short time and in the spring of 1849 moved on his farm in Jersey county, where he now resides. On the 19th of August 1837, he was married to Miss Harriet S. Allen, daughter of Samuel Allen, who at the time was collector of the part of Bristol, Rhode Island. Mr. Warren and wife have had nine children, eight of whom are yet living; three daughters and on son are married. He was elected judge in 1841; held hat office till 1849, when he was elected county judge as the Whig candidate; held that office eight years. In January, 18??, he opened a law office, in partnership with his son-in-law, William H. _?_; was appointed United States Commissioner December 12, 18??, under the administration of Johnson. During the late rebellion, Mr. Warren was among the staunches supporters of the Union cause. Few men in Jersey county exercised a more _?_ for the cause of the Union that the subject of this sketch. In 1863 he received the appointment of enrolling officer. When he came west he had a fair start in life. He is one of that class who have no desire to accumulate wealth except for the benefits and pleasures that it will confer. Politically, in early life he became a member of the Whig party, and acted in its behalf until the formation of the Republican party. His first vote was given for General Harrison. He voted twice for Abraham Lincoln and subsequently for U. S. Grant. For profound learning and polished culture Judge Warren has but few equals in Southern Illinois. His _?_ in law sheds a lustre over the bar of which his is a member.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Sebastian WATSON, the eighth child of Jesse and Matilda Watson, who had a family of nine children, was born in Wayne county, Illinois, October 30th, 1817. Mr. Watson, the father of the above, was a native of Pennsylvania, and when he was thirteen years of age his parents moved to Virginia. He was of Scotch and German extraction. Mrs. W. was a native of Virginia, and of French descent. They were married in the “old Dominion,” and soon after they removed to Ohio, residing in Maumee county several years. In 1816 Mr. W. removed with his family to Wayne county, Illinois, where he was employed in the salt works for several years. In 1821 or 1822 he settled in the present limits of Jersey county, in township 8, range 13, where he resided until his death, which occurred in January, 1838. His wife’s death occurred about eight years previous. Mr. Watson was a soldier in the war of 1812, and lived in this county during the troublesome times of the Blackhawk war.
     Mr. Sebastian Watson was married, May 13th, 1844, to Miss Ruth Barry, daughter of Hugh Barr, Esq., of Macoupin county, Illinois. They had seven children, four of whom are yet living. After his marriage, Mr. Watson settled on a farm which he had previously purchased. He commenced life with but small means, but, by strict economy and industry, has acquired a comfortable competence, and enough of the elegances of life to make home pleasant. Mrs. Watson died at their residence December 24th, 1860. He was then married, on the 15th of August, 1865, to Mrs. Caroline R. Brook, relict of the late William Brook, and they have had three children – two of whom are yet living.
     When Mr. Watson settled in this county, the county was almost in its primitive state. He remembers seeing the wild Indian and deer in their native wildness. Mr. W. now has one of the best farms in the township where he resides. Wheat and stock growing have principally occupied his attention.
     Early in life he became identified with the whig party, and was a great admirer of its illustrious champion, Henry Clay. He voted first for General Harrison, and the last time for Abraham Lincoln. During the most troublesome period of the late war he was a strong Union man, and his house was ever open for the reception of the Union soldier. Mr. Watson is among the oldest living settlers of the county, and is highly respected for his well-known hospitality, which he dispenses with the ease and grace of olden times.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Hon. Benjamin WEDDING was born in Sciota county, Ohio, April 14, 1826. He is the youngest of a family of eight children of James H. and Nancy Wedding. They were both natives of the District of Columbia. In 1814 they moved to Sciota county, Ohio, where they resided until 1834, when they removed to the present limits of Jersey county, and settled on the Illinois bottom. Mr. Wedding died on the 10th of August, 1837; his widow survived his death until August 10th, 1841. Mr. Benjamin Wedding being all early resident in this county, was, in a measure, deprived of the advantages of good schools, yet, by assiduous industry and application, he gained a sound knowledge of the general branches of an education, and at time early age of twenty was licensed to teach. He then followed teaching six months of the year for about ten years, farming during the summer months. On the 9th of August, 1847, Mr. Wedding was married to Miss Tabitha Johnson, daughter of James E. and Rebecca Johnson, of this county, though formerly from Ohio. Mr. Wedding and wife have had eleven children, five of whom died in infancy. In 1854 Mr. W. was elected coroner of Jersey county, and in the fall of 1856 was elected sheriff, as the candidate of the whig party. He filled these offices with credit both to himself and the people of the county. In politics, Mr. Wedding has been a whig and a republican. His first vote was cast for General Taylor, and he, subsequently voted twice for the immortal Lincoln. During the most trying times of the late rebellion, the Union cause had, in Mr. Wedding, a strong, supporter. The Wedding family are of English descent. Every resident of the United States of that name (Wedding) is of blood relation. In 1856 Mr. W. became a resident of Jerseyville, where he has since resided. In 1865 he received time appointment of internal revenue collector for Jersey and Calhoun Counties, and in 1868 resigned that office. In 1862 he became an agent for securing United States bounties and pensions for soldiers and others. In 1870 Mr. Wedding, was elected mayor of Jerseyville. He has for many years been recognized as among the prominent leaders of the republican party in this county. He has been a citizen of Jersey county for over thirty-eight years, and by the bland index of his honest and benevolent countenance, united with his gentlemanly manners, has won the respect of those who have the pleasure of his, acquaintance, regardless of political asperities.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Thomas WEDDING, ESQ, is a native of Washington city, District of Columbia. He was born July 18, 1808. He is the second child of James H. and Nancy Wedding, who were natives of Prince George county, Maryland. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, participating in the defence of Washington. His occupation was that of a farmer. In September, 1814, he removed with his family to Sciota county, Ohio, locating near Portsmouth, where he resided about twenty years, and in 1834 removed to the present limits of Jersey county, Illinois, locating on a farm in the Illinois bottom, His death occurred in August, 1837. Mrs. Wedding survived her husband until August, 1841. Mr. Thomas Wedding, when quite a small boy can remember seeing the British troops that were stationed around Washington after the burning of the National Capital. Most of his early education wasobtained in the common schools of Ohio. At that early day facilities for school purposes were but limited. Most of his time previous to his marriage was employed in assisting his father in carrying on the farm. In April, 1835, he entered a farm of about four hundred acres of land, being the farm now owned by J. C. Reid, Esq. He resided on that farm about fourteen years. Mr. Wedding went back to Ohio, and was married, June 23, 1842, to Miss Matilda Noel, daughter of Col. Jacob and Lucretia Noel, of Sciota county, Ohio. Col. Noel was a soldier in the war of 1812, and commanded a regiment, doing good service in that war. When Mr. Wedding came to Illinois he had hardly any capital, but being industrious and economical, he succeeded in acquiring a home for himself and family. Of course he had many hardships to encounter, which characterize the condition of the early pioneers. When he landed in this county he had only three hundred dollars as a capital to commence life with, and it has been the peculiar fortune of Mr. Wedding to have witnessed many importantchanges in the history of Jersey county. When he commenced to improve a farm on its borders, the country was in its primitive state, and but few years before the Indian was roaming over its plains, but, by his industrious hand they were soon made to yield large crops of golden grain, instead of furnishing meagre subsistence for the wandering savage. Mr. Wedding and wife became members of the Baptist church about 1851, and in 1862 joined the Christian church. Quite early in life he joined the ranks of the whig party. His first vote for president was cast for Henry Clay, and on the dissolution of the whig party he joined the republicans. He voted twice for Abraham Lincoln, and as many times for General Grant. During the war he was not among the weak-kneed in this section of the country, but was among the strong advocates of an immediate suppression of the rebellion. His venerable wife, after lingering with an illness forseveral years, died at their residence on the 14th of June, 1868, and Mr. Wedding was married to his present wife on the 28th of January, 1872. She was a Miss Mary Crull, daughter of John and Sarah Crull, of Jersey county, with whom Mr. Wedding now lives, at his residence, enjoying the fruits of a well spent life. He is highly respected for his Christian character, and his generous and hospitable nature.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


John I. WHITE, the sixth of a family of seven children, was born at Greenville, Bond county, Illinois, January 31st, 1835. His parents, James and Mary White, were natives of North Carolina, and in 1816 the emigrated to Illinois, where Mr. White’s occupation was that of a farmer. His wife died at their residence about the year 1850, and Mr. White is now residing with his son, John I.
     The subject of this sketch was educated at Greenville Academy, Illinois, and in 1854 he taught school near Greenville. In 1855 he became a citizen of Jersey county, and taught school at various places in the county. On the 12th of August, 1862, he enlisted in Company C, one hundred and twenty-fourth Illinois infantry, but the hard marches and privations of camp life so told on his health and constitution, that, at the expiration of one year, he received an honorable discharge, and returned home. On the 29th of September, 1864, Mr. White was married to Miss Sarah J. Smith, eldest daughter of Eleazer M. and Susan Smith, old residents of Jersey county. Mr. Smith was born in New Jersey, in April, 1819, and in 1837 he settled in the present limits of Jersey county. In March, 1843, Mr. Smith was married to Miss Susan Harriott, daughter of Alfred I. and Sarah Harriott, who were formerly natives of Somerset county, New Jersey, though they came to Illinois one year after Mr. Smith. Mr. S. and wife had two daughters, both of whom are yet living. Soon after his marriage he purchased the farm on which John I. White now resides, and was there engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death. He was a man of strong will and determination of character, and when he had anything to do, he did it, instead of talking about doing it. In early life he became a whig, and acted with that party until its disorganization, after which he always acted with the republicans, and was among the leaders of that party in Jersey county. He voted twice for Abraham Lincoln, and during his administration as president, Mr. Smith was appointed deputy collector of internal revenue for this district. He died on the 28th of June, 1865, respected by many friends. His wife’s death occurred December 8th, 1864. Both had been for many years members of the First Presbyterian Church, at Jerseyville. Mrs. Smith’s mother, Mrs. Harriott, died at the residence of Mr. White, on the 15th of March, 1872, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years.
     Mr. White and wife have had one son. They are both members of the Presbyterian church at Jerseyville. Mrs. W. was educated at Jerseyville High School, and is a lady of polish and culture. Since his marriage, Mr. White’s attention has been devoted to agricultural pursuits. In politics, he is a staunch republican.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Jacob E. WHITENACK, Esq., is a native of Somerville, Somerset county, New Jersey, and was born February 12, 1826. He is the second of a family of five children of Henry and Harriet Whitenack. Mr. Whitenack was also a native of New Jersey, and his wife of Philadelphia. He was of Holland descent; Mrs. Whitenack descended from the Germans. The subject of this sketch received his early education in the district schools of Somerville. He succeeded in acquiring a fair business education, sufficient for practical purposes. At the early age of fourteen years he commenced to learn the tailor’s trade. On the 6th of December, 1849, he was married to Miss Lynda Myra C. Tharp, daughter of Mathias Tharp, of Hunterdon county, New Jersey. Mr. Whitenack and wife have had a family of ten children, of whom eight are yet living. In 1848 Mr. W. engaged in merchandise at Fox Hill, Hunterdon county, New Jersey. Taking the western fever, however, he embarked with his family to Illinois, landing in Jerseyville on the 23d of May, 1852, where he has since resided, except a few months in Christian county in 1855. In early life Mr. Whitenack became a member of the democratic party, though in 1863 he joined the republicans, to which party he has since strictly adhered. During the second year of Buchanan’s administration he was appointed postmaster at Jerseyville, and retained that office until Lincoln became president. In may, 1869, he was appointed to the same office by President Grant, and is the present incumbent. By his gentlemanly deportment in filling his office, together with his affable manners, he has won the respect of a large circle of friends.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


John C. WINSOR, the oldest of a family of seven children, is a native of Devonshire, England. He was born January 31st, 1812, and when four years of age his parents, William and Agnes Winsor, emigrated to America. They located on a farm in Somerset county, New Jersey, where the subject of this sketch was raised. He remained at home during his early life, and was employed on his father’s farm, at the same time obtaining a good practical business education. William Winsor, the father, was killed, about the year 1860, while crossing a railroad track in his wagon. His wife is still living, in the enjoyment of good health, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years, residing at Bound Brook, New Jersey.
     Mr. John Winsor made a prospecting tour to Illinois in 1838, and spent one summer in the state, when he again returned to New Jersey. In 1840 he settled in Greene county, Illinois, having purchased a small tract of land on the south edge of Manchester Prairie, which he partially improved and resided on four years. He was married, May 13th, 1844, to Miss Caroline E. Lowe, a native of Yorkshire, England, but at the time of marriage a citizen of Greene county, Illinois. They have had a family of four children, one of whom is deceased; the others are single, and reside at home with their parents. In 1844, Mr. Winsor settled two and one-fourth miles east of Jerseyville, which was at that time an open prairie. Here he has improved and made a fine farm, and his substantial farm residence, with beautiful lawn in front, are among the indications of the proprietor’s good taste. Mr. W. is truly a model farmer, and is among the substantial citizens of the county, although he began life with small capital. By dint of perseverance, he has succeeded in acquiring a comfortable home for himself an family. He has always been actuated by such principles of a good citizen and business man as have tended to raise him in the estimation of all who are acquainted with him. Mr. Winsor and his wife are both members of the First Presbyterian Church, at Jerseyville. Politically, he was a member of the whig party, but, on the disorganization of that party, he became identified with the democratic party. He has taken pride in giving his children the advantages of a good education, as well as in the order of his farming arrangements, which are a sure indication of the industry and good taste of the proprietor. [See residence view
1872 Farms & Residences]

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Ambrose S. WYCKOFF, Esq., was born in Scoharie county, New York, May 27, 1806. He is the fifth of a family of six children of John and Jane Wyckoff, who were both natives of New Jersey, and were married in that state. A few years after they moved to New York, and engaged in farming. From thence he removed to the present limits of Jersey county, about the year 1836, and settled on a farm near where Delhi now stands, and about six years after settled in Jersey county. He died at the age of 73 years. Mrs. Wyckoff survived her husband’s death sixteen years. Mr. Ambrose S. Wyckoff spent his early boyhood on his father’s farm, except the time employed in attending the district school. He was married in November, 1831, to Miss Elizabeth Haumer, daughter of John Haumer, of the city of New York. At the time of his marriage, Mr. W. was keeping a family grocery in the city. He left there in December, 1832, on a prospecting tour through the West and South, and finally purchased the farm on which he now resides, in Jersey county, March 12, 1833. His family came out soon after with his brother-in-law, Dr. Knapp. Mr. W. was the first person to settlein the prairie — known at that time as “Cumming’s prairie.” His firsthouse cost twelve dollars, and now he is living in his third one — a large and commodious structure. Mr. Wyckoff, like many of the old settlers of this state, came here poor. He immediately set about to carve out of the rough material a home for his family. Mrs. Wyckoff died in 1837. By this marriage he had two children, one of whom died with the cholera in 1851. In 1839, Mr. W. was married to Miss Sarah Gelder, of Macoupin county, Illinois. They have had five boys and one girl; three are married. Ambrose B., his fourth son by his last wife, is a master in the United States navy. The ancestors of the Wyckoff family were Holland Dutch. The subject of this sketch is of the fourth or fifth generation since their settlement in America. His grandfather did some good service for the Continental army in the war of independence. In early life Mr. W. became identified with the Democratic party, and tenaciously adheres to the same political creed. He cast his first vote for Andrew Jackson. Mrs. Wyckoff is a member of the Presbyterian church. In 1854 he made an overland trip to Oregon, to visit that country, and remained there about nine months. He has for many years been considered as among the best farmers of the county. He is of that class who have made their own fortune by their native ability and energy, and in the life of Mr. W. we can learn many lessons of profit. Agricultural pursuits appeared to be his most natural occupation, and as the reward of his industry he is now the owner of a handsome property.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


James M. YOUNG, the eldest of a family of seven children, was born inRutherford county, North Carolina, December 16th, 1828. His parents,Martin and Deborah Young, were of French and German descent. In 1835 Mr. Young removed with his family to McDonough county, Illinois, and located on a farm near Blandinsville, where he remained until 1845, when he removed to the state of Georgia. After the war broke out, Mr. Young and family came to Jersey county. He died at the residence of his son, Jas. M. Young, in the fall of 1865, and in the following spring his widow and children returned to Georgia, where they now reside. James M. Young attended the common schools of McDonough county, and at the age of sixteen went to Wisconsin and worked in the lead mines, at which he continued about four years, and then settled in Jersey county, and for a few years followed boating and rafting on the Illinois river. On the 15th of October, 1851, at the age of twenty-three years, Mr. Young was married to Miss Lucetta Nott, daughter of S. B. Nott, of Jersey county, Illinois. They have had six children, two of whom are deceased. For a few years after his marriage, he followed farming, in township 8, range 13. He waselected justice of the peace, in which office he served four years, and for the last three years has been deputy sheriff. In the fall of 1871 he was elected assessor and treasurer of Jersey county, and is the present incumbent.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page