Jersey County ILGenWeb, copyright Judy Griffin 2002, 2003. In keeping with our policy of providing free information on the Internet, data and images may be used by non-commercial entities, as long as this message remains on all copied material. These electronic pages cannot be reproduced in any format for profit or for other presentation without express permission by the contributor(s).

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page

Biographies in the
Atlas Map of Jersey County, Illinoisby Andreas, Lyter & Co., Davenport, IA, 1872

Joseph B. SCHROEDER, Esq., was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, December 24, 1821. He is the second child of a family of four children of Charles H. and Hannah Schroeder, who were both natives of Pennsylvania, and of German and English descent. In 1838 Mr. S. removed with his family to St. Louis, and about 1845 his wife died in that city. He survived her death until 1847. Mr. Schroeder served in the war of 1812, and was, for a considerable portion of the time, clerk to the captain of the “Revenue Cutter,” of the privateer service. His wife’s father, Dr. H. Y. Carter, was a surgeon in the army during the revolutionary contest. J. B. Schroeder was educated principally in the schools of Delaware county, Pennsylvania, where he laid the foundation of a knowledge of the rudiments of a common school education. When about fourteen years of age he became an apprentice to learn the coach making trade. In the fall of 1840 he went to St. Louis, where he resided until January, 1841, after which he came to Illinois, landing at Grafton. After a stay in that place for a few days, he rode over to Otter Creek Prairie, and there formed a partnership with William Montgomery, in wagon making. The partnership lasted about a year. Mr. S. then carried on the business alone until 1844. On the 16th May, 1844, he was married to Miss Priscilla Patterson, daughter of Major Gershon Patterson, an old resident of Jersey county. Major Patterson was born in Kentucky, in 1796. His parents removed with him to Illinois in 1797. He was married to Miss Eleanor Cooper, of Kentucky, in 1819. By that union he had five children, two of whom are yet living. In March, 1820, he removed with his family to the present limits of Jersey county. On the fifth of January, 1821, he entered a body of land in this county, and immediately after commenced to improve the same. On the breaking out of the Blackhawk war, he enlisted, and was immediately after elected captain. He proceeded with his men to join the army stationed at Rock Island, and after the treaty was effected and the army disbanded, he returned to his farm. He was a short time after commissioned major of militia by the governor of Illinois.
     Major Patterson and wife were both members of the Methodist Church. He was a man of the old style of hospitality, genial and courteous to all. In politics he was a whig. Mrs. Patterson died at their home November 10, 1853, and on the 24th of January, 1856, the Major was married to Mrs. Mary Mabee. As a farmer, he was successful, and at the time of his death owned upwards of eighteen hundred acres of good land in Jersey and Montgomery counties. He died January 30, 1857, and his wife survived him until January 20, 1870.
     Such is the narrative of one of the oldest pioneers of the county. Mr. J. B. Schroeder and wife have had five children, four of whom are yet living. Their eldest daughter, Nellie, is the wife of L. L. Hereford. The other children remain single. After his marriage Mr. S. settled on the farm where he now resides. When he and his young bride first lived in their log cabin it was almost surrounded by forest trees, and in that dreary solitude he commenced to clear a farm. Few men of our day would have the pluck to go out and encounter those hardships; but possessing industry and energy, he was successful in the accomplishment of his designs. He has now a farm of upwards of six hundred acres, which is among the best wheat-growing farms in Jersey county. He also has a wood lot of one hundred and twenty acres, near Fielding.
     At the age of sixteen Mr. S. became a member of the Methodist church. His wife has also for many years been a member of that church. Mr. Schroeder’s first vote for president was cast for Henry Clay. After the whig party was disorganized he joined the ranks of the democracy, to which he has strongly adhered. He is also a member of the “mystic tie.” Mr. S. yet retains his love for the old sports of pioneer life, and is as fond as ever of the chase after the deer. Even now, with his old companions, he frequently spends a few days in the hunt. He is now residing on his farm, enjoying the fruits of a well spent life.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


John G. SCHWARZ was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, March 18, 1836. He is the oldest child of John G. and Rosina Schwarz, who were natives of Germany. His father is a farmer and is still living. John G. emigrated to this county in the spring of 1854, and settled in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he remained about two years, engaged in a livery, sale and feed stable. He located in Jerseyville in 1856, and there opened the same business, which he followed till the spring of 1869(?), when he removed to his farm where he now resides. This property he had purchased previously, and now has in successful operation the most extensive vineyard and the best and most capacious wine cellar in the county. His fruit farm is in a high state of cultivation. We may safely assert that his native wines are equal, if not superior, to any produced elsewhere in this county. As a horticulturist, he stands deservedly high, and has achieved a great success in bringing this important branch of industry to so high a state of perfection. True, his operations are yet in their incipient stages, although he now manufactures several thousand gallons of choice native wines, besides distilling peaches, grapes and apples. His energy is a sure guaranty of the ultimate success of his manufacturing interests.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Judge Joseph G. SCOTT is a native of Somerset county, New Jersey, born August 12, 1809. He is the eldest son of Col. Joseph Warren Scott, who was an eminent lawyer of New Jersey, and a native of that State, and during his life he was a brilliant practitioner at the bar. His grandfather was a Scotchman, who settled in Pennsylvania at an early day, and from him sprung this branch of the Scott family in America. Col. Scott’s father, Dr. Moses Scott, was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania. He was a surgeon in the army during the war of independence. When nineteen years of age, Cob. Scott commenced the study of law at Millstone, New Jersey, with Gen. Frelinghuysen, of revolutionary fame. He was married to Miss Jane Griffiths, daughter of Joseph Griffiths, of Long Island. They had born to them six children, three of whom are yet living. Col. Scott died at hisresidence, New Brunswick, New Jersey, April 27, 1871, at the advanced age of ninety-three. Judge Scott received his preparatory education at the grammar school of Queen’s college, and when about eighteen years of age he entered Rutger’s college, immediately after its organization under that name, entering the sophomore class and graduating three years after with the first honors of the class, which numbered twenty students. He gave the valedictory address. After leaving college he studied law three years in the office of his father, and one year with Elias Van Arsdale, senior, of Newark, New Jersey, after which he was admitted to the bar as an attorney, and after practicing at New Brunswick three years, was then admitted topractice in the court of chancery. In the spring of 1835 he started west, landing at Jerseyville on the 5th of July. Soon after he entered a farm three miles south of the then village, which he commenced to improve. In 1839 he was married to Miss Eliza Duryee, daughter of Richard Duryee, of New York. Mr. Scott was elected the first judge of Jersey county after its organization, and four years after was re-elected. Like most of the other old settlers, Judge Scott came to this State with a small capital; but with that energy and perseverance which characterize the Judge, he was enabled to acquire a comfortable fortune. In 1856 he sold his farm and retired from the more active pursuits of life, and settled in the southsuburbs of Jerseyville, though occasionally devoting some of his time to the settlement of estates. Judge Scott and wife are members of the First Presbyterian church of Jerseyville. Politically, in early life he became identified with the Whig party, and acted with that party until its disorganization, since which time he has been an adherent to the principles of the Democratic party. Judge Scott, though a gentleman of fine classical attainments and extensive culture, has for the greater portion of his time lived the quiet life of a farmer, beloved and respected by a large circle of acquaintances. He came here when Jersey county was in its infancy and has done considerable to develop its resources and promote its interests. By his urbane and genial manner he has won many friends, and his benevolence and kindness of heart are well known to a large circle of acquaintances and friends. Judge Scott is now residing at his residence, hale and hearty, enjoying the fruits of a well-spent life. Such is but a brief narrative of one of Jersey county’s old and prominent citizens.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Thomas J. SELBY was born in Delaware county, Ohio, December 4, 1845. He is the eldest of four children of O. H. and Margaret Selby. Mr. Selby, father of the above, was a native of Virginia, his wife of New Jersey. She was of Dutch descent, Mr. Selby of English. In 1849 he removed with his family to Crawford county, Illinois, where he resided until his death. Mrs. Selby is now residing in Jerseyville.

Thomas J. Selby had rather poor expectations for attending school and his education is the result of his own indefatigable industry and energy and we now find him to be a gentleman of liberal and extensive views.

In the winter of 1858 he commenced teaching school, in which profession he was employed until 1864; during his leisure moments he read law, and was admitted to the bar in December 1864. On the 10th of March, 1863, he was married to Miss Amanda Richardson, daughter of Larkin Richardson of Jersey County. They have had, as the result of that union, four children.

In the fall of 1864, Mr. Selby was elected sheriff of Jersey county, an office which he held for two years, and was the first and only sheriff of this county who was called upon to execute capital punishment, which was the hanging of Thomas Moss.

After the expiration of his official term, he purchased the Jersey County Democrat and published that newspaper until October 1, 1869. In the fall of that year he was elected county clerk and is the present incumbent. Such in brief is the life of the clerk of Jersey county.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


General James SEMPLE was a native of Greene county, Kentucky. He was born January 5, 1798. He was the oldest of a family of nine children of Dr. John W. Semple and Lucy Robertson Semple. Dr. Semple was lineally descended from some of the ancient and honorable families of Scotland. His ancestors were principally residents of Remfordsire, and in the history of the meritorious deeds of that county, honorable mention is made of the name of Semple. The venerable subject of this sketch received his early education in the schools of Greensboro, Kentucky, attaining, by his industry and love of learning, both solid and polished acquirements. After leaving school, and when about twenty-two years of age, he went to Charatin, Missouri, residing there about one year, when he returned to Kentucky and commenced the study of law, at Louisville, and in due time was admitted to the bar.

In 1828, Gen. Semple settled in Edwardsville, Illinois, and there commenced the practice of law, and by his native ability and energy, soon became one of the recognized leaders of his profession. On the breaking out of the Black hawk war, he was one of the first to enlist, and was soon after commissioned a Brigadier General, and served on Gen. Whiteside’s staff. He returned to Edwardsville and resumed the practice of his profession.

In the fall of 1832, General Semple, as candidate of the democratic party, was elected to a seat in the state legislature, as the representative from Madison county. he was twice re-elected, and for two terms was speaker of the house.

On the 5th of June, 1833, he was married to Mrs. Mary S. Mizner, daughter of Dr. Cairns, of Monroe County, Illinois. Mrs. Semple’s father, Dr. Cairns, was a member of the first constitutional convention of Illinois.

Gen. Semple and wife had four children, three daughters and one son; two daughters and son yet living.

In 1837 Gen. Semple was appointed, by President Van Buren, minister to Bogota. He filled that position, with marked ability till 1842, when, disliking the administration of President Harrison, he resigned and returned to his home. In the fall of 1842 he was elected judge of the circuit court, and soon after one of the judges of the supreme court; and a vacancy occurring in the United States Senatte, he was appointed by Governor Ford to fill the place.

Soon after the appointment the election came on, and he was elected to the full term of six years. He filled the position with distinguished honor to himself and general satisfaction to his constituents. His private business requiring his personal attention, though earnestly solicited, he refused to become a candidate for re-election. While in the United States Senate he took part in some of the most important measures of the day.

As a jurist, Gen. Semple was among those who have given tone to the jurisprudence of Illinois, and reflected lustre upon the bar of which he was a member. When he came to Illinois he had, financially, but small capital, but with a large stock of energy and perseverance, he set about to carve out a home for himself and his family, and to obtain a position in society, in both of which Joe was eminently successful. As a statesman he ranks among Illinois’ great men. By his urbane and polished manners, he endeared himself to a large circle of friends. In the early history of the state Gen. Semple exercised a marked influence as one of its leading politicians, and in Ford’s History of Illinois, honorable mention is made of his statesmanlike career. Illinois clothed him with her highest honors, and that of itself sufficiently attests the warm appreciation in which he was held by his fellow citizens. Gen. Semple died at his beautiful residence, Trevue, near Elsah, Illinois, on the 20th of December , 1866.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Hon. William SHEPHARD is a native of Yorkshire, England. He was born August 19, 1816, and is the only child of William and Mary Shephard. Mr. Shephard, after the death of his wife, emigrated to the United States. The subject of this sketch received his early education in the select schools of his native country, and at the early age of sixteen emigrated to America, landing at New York in June, 1882. After remaining in that city a short time he went to Griggstown, New Jersey, and was for a short time employed at shoemaking, when he turned his attention to working on the Raritan canal, which was then under construction. He resided in that locality about three years, after which he removed to Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and lived there about three years; and in the spring of 1838 came to St. Louis, In October, of the same year, he located in Coles county, Illinois, where soon after he became a contractor under the state internal improvement system, on the Central Branch railroad, now a part of the Indianapolis road. His partners in that enterprise were Richard JOHNSON and David DUNSDEN, both old settlers of Jersey county. After the completion of that contract Mr. Shephard became a citizen of this county, and settled in Jerseyville in the fall of 1839. His first employment was in contracting to dig down the bluff at Grafton, preparatory to the making of a county road. His next occupation was carrying on shoemaking in Jerseyville. In November, 1840, he was married to Ann Marid GROSS, of Dauphin county, Pennsylvania. She was the dauther of Adam and Elizabeth Gross. They have had nine children, all of whom are yet living. In 1847, Mr. Shephard engaged in merchandising at Grafton, which business he continued until 1852, when he turned his attention to railroad contracting in Missouri for about three years; soon after which he was appointed president of the Jacksonville, Alton & St. Louis railroad, the northern terminus of which was then Jacksonville. He filled that office until the latter part of 1860, and in 1862 resumed merchandising in Jerseyville and continued in the same until the spring of 1869. In the fall of 1866, Mr. Shephard was elected to a seat in the senate of Illinois from the sixth senatorial district, as the candidate of the democratic party. He was re-elected in the fall of 1870, and resigned in 1871. Mr. Shephard was by his ripe and mature judgment eminently qualified to fill the honorable position of senator, bringing to bear an industry and energy equalled by but few in that body, which enabled him to discharge his duties with honor and distinction to himself and general satisfaction to his constituents. He again turned his attention to railroading in 1869, and is now in partnership with others building a road in Texas. When Mr. Shephard landed on American soil, he was poor and friendless; but the affable and courteous manners for which he is noted, soon enabled him to win true and honorable friends, and being endowed with great energy and perseverance and an indomitable industry, he gradually acquired considerable wealth. Few men in Jersey county have been better fitted for a prominent and active business life than Mr. Shephard. He is among that class of men whose integrity and honesty of purpose are never doubted, and is most emphatically a self made man. – Submitted by Rodney L. Noble

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Glover SHORT, the third of a family of ten children, was born in Pennsylvania county, Virginia, October 19th, 1800. His parents, Josiah and Isabel Short, were likewise natives of the “Old Dominion.” Their ancestors were English. William Short, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and settled with his family in Washington county, Ky., in 1804, where he resided until 1818, when he removed to Boone county, Missouri. He died at his residence in 1847. His widow survived him until 1857. Mr. Glover Short was married in Boone county, to Miss Rachel Hodges, on the 4th of April, 1826. She wasthe daughter of David and Aletha Hodges, and was born in St. Louis county, Missouri, April 3d, 1805. They had a family of eight children, all of whom have been married — four are yet living, and all reside in Jersey county, his only son, Edmund H., residing at the old homestead. Mr. Short and wife were both members of the Methodist church. Immediately after their marriage, they moved to Illinois, locating in Greene county, in June, 1826, where he entered some land and made improvements, near where Whitehall is now situated. He first entered eighty acres at government prices, and afterwards purchased enough to make a section. In March, 1842, he removed to Jersey county, and settled on a farm north-east of Jerseyville. Mr. Short commenced life very poor, but, being industrious and saving, has succeeded in laying up something for old age. He says that the old settlers for many years lived principally on corn bread, deermeat, and wild honey. In 1827 he made a trip to the lead mines of Galena, but remained only a short time. Mrs. Short died April 11th, 1865, beloved and respected by a large circle of friends. Mr. S. is yet residing at the old homestead, devoting his attention to agriculture.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Samuel C. SIMMONS was born in Montgomery county, Maryland, March 19th, 1807. He is the oldest son of James and Ann Simmons, who were both natives of Maryland. James Simmons was born in Montgomery county, Maryland, April 23rd, 1773, and was married in January, 1806, to Miss Ann, daughter of Charles Hodges, (who is the grandfather of Judge Hodges, of Carrollton, Illinois). They had by this union seven children, in the following order of birth, viz: Samuel C., (the subject of this sketch); Thomas H., deceased, who was a printer and worked in the Spectator office, at Alton; Sarah E., deceased, former wife of James Cummings, also deceased; John H. H., residing three miles south of Fidelity; Ann M., wife of the late Rev. L. Eddings; and Margaret R., – the last two residing at Humboldt, Kansas.
     Mr. James Simmons moved to Knoxville, east Tennessee, in the fall of 1816, where he resided till the spring of 1830, when he came to the present limits of Jersey county, and settled on Section 26, Township 8, Range 10, where he made the first permanent settlement in the township. He resided on the same farm till his death, which occurred July 13, 1861. His wife died in May, 1827, near Knoxville, Tennessee. The life of Mr. Simmons began under the reign of George the III. He was personally acquainted with George Washington, and voted at each presidential election, except the first term of Washington and the last term of Lincoln, and for U. S. Grant, since we were a nation. He lived to see great improvements in Illinois and Jersey county, and to have the satisfaction of seeing his family comfortably settled in life, and among the useful citizens of a community in which he was one of the pioneers. James Simmons was esteemed by a large circle of friends, and the memory of his worth is still cherished in the community where over forty years of his life were spent.
     Samuel C. Simmons came to Illinois in the fall of 1829, and selected for his father’s family the location which, after a short time, became their home. He was elected justice of the peace in August, 1831, the first in the township. He was married, Mary 10th, 1832, to Miss Martha R., daughter of Rev. Jacob Miller, one of the early settlers of Macoupin county. They had by this union six children, in the following order of birth, viz.: James M., now a citizen of Colorado; Thomas H., now residing near Brighton, Illinois, who took an active part in the late rebellion, was over four years in the service, and severely wounded, in the battle of Shiloh, by a ball passing through his lungs, while acting as first lieutenant of the 14th Illinois, and was also, while on Gen. Palmer’s staff, again wounded by a shell at the battle of Stone river; John R., residing near Litchfield, Illinois; Amelia A., present wife of John W. Stanton, residing at Pierce City, Missouri; Martha R., present wife of John Barber, residing near Brighton; Sarah C., present wife of David O. Trotter, residing on the old homestead of James Simmons. Mrs. Simmons died in February, 1848. Mr. Simmons was again married to Miss Loranda C. Miles, September 10th, 1848. They had by this union five children, as follows, viz.: Araminta, present wife of George Barber, residing near Brighton, Illinois; Helen O., Charles W., Albert N., and Elmer R., residing with their father. Mrs. Simmons died August 10, 1864. Mr. Simmons has followed farming thus far through life. He was engaged for a short time in the Black Hawk war in 1831. Although he has not sought official position, he has been an acting justice of the peace for twelve years. Mr. Simmons, for over forty years, has been an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Both of his wives and most of his children were also members of the same church. He took an active part in the great struggle for the life of the nation. As a Christian man and a good citizen, he has the esteem of those who have the pleasure of his acquaintance.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


John W. SISSON was born in Botetourt county, Virginia, March 7th, 1813. He is the second child of Abner and Susannah Sisson, who were natives of Virginia. He removed with his parents to Jefferson county, Kentucky, in the fall of 1820, where he received his early education. In the spring of 1837 he emigrated to Illinois, and settled near Bunker Hill, where, on the 16th of February, 1843, he was married to Miss Martha Jane, daughter of Thomas and Sarah Eaton, of Madison county, Illinois. In March, 1850, with his family, he settled on section 13, township 7, range 12, where he now resides. Mr. S. has now living a family of eight children – three sons and five daughters. Henry H., John Franklin, and Susan S., present wife of Charles P. Stephenson, are citizens of Logan county, Illinois. He gave to each of the above children eighty acres of land, and has about two hundred acres of land in Jackson county, Illinois, besides possessing one of the best farms in the community where he now resides. Those possessions are the legitimate results of honest industry, coupled with good management in the pursuit of agriculture, which he has followed thus far in life. As a farmer, Mr. S. is neat and methodical; as a citizen, public-spirited; as a man, upright and consistant in his dealings and transactions. He is among the substantial and influential citizens of the county, and is highly esteemed by those who are acquainted with him. We refer to him as one of the successful self-made men of Jersey county.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Rev. John W. SLATEN was born in Jackson county, Georgia, August 10, 1810. He is the fourth child of Rev. George and Lucinda Slaten, who were natives of North Carolina, where they were raised. They were married in South Carolina, in 1800, and soon after moved to Georgia, where they resided till March, 1818, when they emigrated to Illinois, and settled in St. Clair county, near Lebanon, residing there till the spring of 1822, when they removed to near Carrollton, Illinois, where they resided eight years. In the spring of 1830 they removed to section 31, township 7, range 11, where they resided till their death. Mr. Slaten died August 6th, 1844, aged sixty-seven years, and his wife died January 23d, 1866, aged eighty-one years. Rev. George Slaten was an active and efficient member of the Methodist Episcopal church. His wife and most of their family (of ten children) were members of the same church. Six sons and one daughter of the family are still living, and are citizens of Jersey county.
     Rev. John W. received his early culture mostly in Illinois. In common with the other members of his father’s family, he had the advantage of good parental instruction. The grandmother, Mrs. Eleanor Brogden, was a woman of rare Christian excellence, whose counsels are now high appreciated by her grandchildren and others who knew her. He was married, October 27th, 1836, to Miss Ann Piggott, daughter of Rev. Isaac N. and Sarah Piggott. By this union they have had a family of ten children, seven sons and three daughters, seven of whom are still living, three well settled in life. Mr. Slaten engaged in mercantile business in June, 1836, near Newbern, Jersey county, where he continued till the fall of 1838, when he settled on a farm near Otterville, continuing till 1847. He next engaged in the firm of W. B. Slaten & Co., merchants, at Grafton, in which he continued nearly twenty years, during which time he was also engaged in the firm of Brock & Co., and lastly in the firm of J. W. Slaten & Co. Having disposed of his interest in this firm in 1867, he has since been engaged in the practice of law and as conveyancer, and notary public. He was licensed to preach in the summer of 1843. His labors have, in this profession, been local. He was elected an acting justice of the peace in 1840, which position he filled satisfactorily to the public for several years. Mr. Slaten, by an active, upright life of nearly forty years, has won the esteem of a large circle of friends, who duly appreciate his virtues as a good citizen and honorable business man.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


John M. SMITH is a native of Monmouth county, New Jersey, where he was born January 5, 1811. He is the second of a family of four children of Hugh and Catherine Smith, who were also natives of New Jersey. Mr. Smith’s occupation was that of a farmer. His father, Capt. Matchett Smith, the grandfather of John M., commanded a company in the army during the war for independence, participating in the many hard-fought campaigns of the glorious struggle. Mr. Hugh Smith and wife both spent the residue of their lives in Monmouth county, New Jersey.
     The subject of this sketch received his early schooling in the common schools of Monmouth county, obtaining an education sufficient for all practical purposes, and at sixteen years of age became an apprentice to the blacksmith trade. Like many others, he became desirous of trying his fortune in the west, and accordingly, in the spring of 1835, Mr. Smith landed at Whitehall, Greene county, Ill., where he worked at his trade a little over one year, and in the fall of 1836 removed to Jerseyville, where he soon after opened a shop and carried on blacksmithing about ten years. On the 5th of September, 1838, Mr. Smith was married to Miss Temperance E. Davis, daughter of Wm. B. Davis, of Jersey county, though formerly Mr. D. and family were from North Carolina, and moved to Greene county, Ill., when Mrs. Smith was only seven years of age. The ancestorial descent is Welsh, German, and Irish. Mr. Smith and wife have had two sons. Their eldest son, William B., died in September, 1835(?); Charles M. is married to his second wife, and now residing in Pike county, Mo. In 1841 Mr. Smith moved on his farm east of Jerseyville, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits about six years, after which he returned to Jerseyville and resumed blacksmithing, which he carried on a few years, and then retired from the more active pursuits of life, though since he has occasionally speculated in real estate. In early life he became a staunch supporter of the principles of the democratic party; his first vote was cast for Andrew Jackson, since which time he has adhered to the same views. He was among those who believed in a prompt suppression of the rebellion. Mr. Smith is a gentleman who has the warm friendship of a large circle of friends.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Mr. Samuel SNEDEKER was born in Middlesex county, New Jersey, January 27, 1802. He is the third child of Isaac and Catharine Snedeker, who had a family of eleven children, five yet living. Mr. S. and wife were both natives of New Jersey. They were of Holland Dutch and German decent. His occupation was that of a farmer. He died at his residence about 1850, at the age of eighty years. Mrs. S.’s death took place several years previous to that of her husband. Mr. Samuel Snedeker received his schooling in the vicinity of Trenton, the facilities at that early day not being very good for obtaining an education. When about twenty-four years of age he commenced clerking in a dry goods and grocery store at Trenton, for Scudder & Reider. He remained there five years. In the fall of 1830, he obtained the position of deputy keeper at time state penitentiary, located at Trenton. He remained in that capacity for a period of fourteen years.He was married, in May, 1840, to Miss Harriet N. Sunderland, daughter of John and Elizabeth Sunderland, of Trenton, New Jersey. They were of English and Irish extraction. Mrs. Snedeker received her education in that city. Mr S. and wife have had two children, a son and daughter. Their son entered the army, at the age of nineteen, during the late civil war. The hard and tedious marches, and exposure of camp life, so told on his health and constitution that he contracted a disease a and died, on the 31st of December, 1866. In the fall of 1844 Mr. Snedeker removed to Illinois, landing at Jerseyville, and settled on the farm which he had previously purchased, which is now within the city limits. Mr. S. has always been a industrious, active, and energetic man, and has been successful in acquiring considerable property, and ranks among the well-to-do farmers of Jersey county. He came here with but little means, except the land that he owned. In 1838 Mr. Snedeker joined a Baptist church at Trenton, his wife having becoming a member of the church previous to their marriage. Theirdaughter, Kate E. Snedeker, is a graduate of “Monticello Female Seminary.” She is a lady of fine attainments and scholastic culture, and is considerably skilled as an artist in oil painting. She graduated with high honors at the seminary, and by her courteous manners endears herself to those who have the pleasure of her acquaintance. She is now the wife of Sir. William Hill, a merchant of Mount Pleasant, Iowa. Politically, in early life Mr. S. became a member of the whig party. His first vote was given for John Q. Adams, after which he became an enthusiastic admirer of General Jackson. After moving to Illinois he became identified with the free soil party, advocating the cause of Fremont, and voting twice for Lincoln for president. Mr. S. is respected by a wide circle of friends, who appreciate his many good qualities, and also those of his amimiablewife.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Isaac SNEDEKER was born at the Four Mile Ferry, north of Trenton, NewJersey, November 22, 1812. He is the youngest son of Isaac and Catharine Snedeker. When a boy Mr. S. used to attend the district schools of his native state, and most of his early boyhood was spent on his father’s farm, until the age of nineteen, after which, for a few years, he was employed on the public works of that state, — such as the building of the Camden & Amboy Railroad, Trenton Water Works, and Delaware and Raritan Canal, and also in assisting in the sale of, and getting information for, the New Jersey Historical Gazetteer and Map of the State. In those various pursuits he spent four years. He then settled in Monroe county, New York, where he bought a farm jointly with his father. He was there engaged in farming about ten years; then, disposing of his property, he came west to Jersey county, Illinois, arriving in May, 1844, where, for a time, he assisted in carrying on his brother Samuel’s farm, south of Jerseyville. He was married, the 25th of June, 1846, to Miss Caroline Sunderland, daughter of John Sunderland, of Trenton, New Jersey. They have had three children, two of whom are yet living. Their son, Orville A. Snedeker, received his literary education at Shurtliff College, Alton, Illinois, and studied law with Hon. R. A. King, and also for a short time at Chicago. He was admitted to the bar in 1870, after which he opened an office in Jerseyville. Samuel G. is engaged in farming with his father. Mr. S. came here poor, but now owns several hundred acres of as fine lands as Illinois affords, besides considerable other property. Mr. S. in early life became opposed to the institution of slavery, and while in New York was made president of an anti-slavery society. He was also elected president of theJersey County Anti-Slavery Society. In those times it required a man to he possessed of strong nerve and pluck to dare to advocate anti-slavery measures. He voted first for Henry Clay, twice for Lincoln, the latter with whom he was personally acquainted, and during the dark days of secession Mr. S. was among that class of men who dared to come out boldly and advocate the cause of the Union. That cause in Jersey county had few warmer friends than Isaac Snedeker. He was once a candidate for sheriff on the anti-slavery ticket. Mr. S. is a member of the Baptist church. He is among the more solid men of Jersey county. [See farm view 1872 Farms & Residences]

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Deacon Jacob K. STELLE is a native of Somerset county, New Jersey, and was born September 2d, 1816. His father was a native of Middlesex county, New Jersey. The ancestral descent is French and Scotch. Mr. Stelle was married to Anna Kirkpatrick, and they had a family of five children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the second, and of whom three are yet living. Mr. Stelle’s occupation was that of a farmer. In April, 1850, while on a visit to his son Jacob, in Jersey county, he was taken sick, and, four days after his arrival, died, and was buried in the Van Horn burying ground, near Delhi. His widow survived him until 1870. Mr. Jacob K. Stelle received his early education in the schools of his native state, working on his father’s farm and attending school alternately, until the age of fourteen, when he went to Morristown, and became a clerk in a dry goods store, in which capacity he remained five years, at the end of which period he became a partner of his former employer, Wm. M. Lindsley. The partnership was continued for two years (until Mr. Stelle was twenty-one years of age), when, on the 10th of October, 1837, with a party of eleven others, he left New Jersey, with wagon teams, his destination being Illinois. The party arrived at Jacksonville on the 21st of November, the accomplishing of the trip having required forty-two days. During the winter Mr. Stelle rode over a large portion of the state, viewing the different localities, with a view of securing a home for himself and family. He purchased a farm in what is now Jersey county, township 7, range 11, and, in February, 1838, made the first improvements on his farm. The first work he did was shouldering his axe and walking three miles to the timber, and there engaged in chopping off rail-cuts. Being unused to the work, about two o’clock in the afternoon he gave out, and sought restand refreshments at the nearest neighbors. The following year he raised a crop. Mr. Stelle was married, on the 15th of November, 1838, to Miss Eliza Jane Compton, formerly of New Jersey, a school-mate, and one of the party that accompanied him on his western trip. Mrs. Stelle is the daughter of Moore and Mary Compton. They were married in a log house occupied by Mr. Stelle’s brother-in-law: and, the bed-room being up stairs, in coming down to get married, they made their descent on a common rung ladder. They have had a family of six children – three sons and three daughters — four of whom are yet living — three married. When Mr. Stelle came to Illinois he hadbut a small capital. For the first two years he carried on the farm, he had no team, with the exception of one ox; but, with the energy of the early pioneers of this state, he persevered until he had a home for himself and family; and possessing that Scotch blood which is noted for pluck, he has enabled to acquire a competence, and is now considered among the wealthy farmers of Jersey county. Having, two years since, retired from the more active pursuits of life, he now resides at his suburban residence, south of the city of Jerseyville. Mr. Stelle has demonstrated the fact that industry, frugality, and honesty are the sure road to wealth, and a position in society, which it has been his fortune to obtain. In 1841 Mr. Stelle became a member of the Baptist church in Jerseyville. His wife was a member previous to leaving New Jersey, and her father was also a Deacon of the Baptist church. Mr. Stelle was elected to the responsible position of Deacon of the Baptist church of Jerseyville in 1845, and has filled the position with honor to the church and himself ever since. All his children are members of the same church. Mr. Stelle is among the most prominent citizens of Jersey county, and is highly respected by his fellow citizens. He is a self-made man, and needs no eulogy at our hands, as his life and works speak more ably for him. In politics, he is a Democrat.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Daniel P. STRATTON was born in Bradford, Merrimack county, New Hampshire, December 18, 1808. He is the third child of Lemuel and Philippi Stratton. Mr. S. was a native of Massachusetts, and his wife of New Hampshire. He received his early education in the schools of Massachusetts, and followed farming as his occupation through life. He was refined in his manners without ostentation; energetic in his actions and yet methodical. He was apparently frail in his physical constitution, but by care, was capable of great endurance. He had a family of eight children, five sons and three daughters, four of whom are still living. The following is the order of birth, viz: Daniel P. residing in Brighton, Ill.; Stephen J., residing in New Bedford, Massachusetts; Levi W., residing in Excelsior, Minnesota; and Horace, residing at Hillsborough Bridge, New Hampshire. Mr. S. removed to Illinois, and settled on section 24, township 7, range 10, in the fall of 1852, where he resided till his death, which occurred November 16, 1854. His wife died in March, 1857.
     Daniel P. Stratton followed farming and carpenter work in his native state. He was married August 8, 1831, to Miss Sarah B. Johnson, of Andover, Massachusetts. By this union they have had a family of five children, three sons and two daughters, in the following order of birth, viz: Sarah E., present wife of H. D. Platt, of Danvers, McLain county, Ill.; Edward B., residing on his father’s old homestead; Nathan J., engaged in coal dealing at Jackson, Ill.; Anna, deceased, former wife of Rev. Frank M. Ellis (she died at Lawrence, Kansas, August 18, 1870); and William P., residing at De Soto, Missouri. Mr. Stratton settled in Alton, Illinois, in October, 1833, where he remained until the first of March, 1833(?), when he settled on the southwest quarter of section 24, township 7, range 10, where he resided till the spring of 1836, when he returned to Alton, and followed building till March, 1840; he then returned to his farm, where he lived till the fall of 1859, when he located in the village of Brighton, where he now resides. He commenced dealing quite largely in grain and lumber in 1857, which he continued till the spring of 1868, since which he has been engaged in a general banking business at Brighton, Ill. Mr. S. was elected justice of the peace in 1835, which position he filled creditably to himself and satisfactorily to others, till he resigned in the spring of 1836. On his return, in 1840, he was elected to the same position, which he filled until he moved to Brighton. Mr. Stratton is one of those substantial men who command the respect of their fellow citizens. Mrs. Stratton died July 2, 1865. Mr. Stratton was again married, May 25, 1868, to Mrs. Sarah A., relict of the late John Thompson, formerly a citizen of Brighton, Macoupin county, Ill.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Note: _?_ indicates an unreadable word or words

Col. George R. SWALLOW was born in Greene county, Illinois, August 21, 2830. He is third of a family of five children of Ransom and Sophia Swallow, who were natives of Vermont. Their ancestors were Scotch and German. Mr. Swallow’s great grandfather on the maternal side was a soldier in the was of the Revolution, and the Colonel’s grandfather was a soldier in the army during the was of 1812. Mr. Ransom Swallow, while a single man, came West, first locating at St. Charles, Mo. He settled in Greene county, Illinois, about the year 1827, soon after engaging in merchandizing and milling at Whitehall. In 1840 he moved to Manchester, where he died in 1844. His widow is yet living in the enjoyment of good health. The Colonel received his early education in the schools of Manchester, and when fourteen years of age set out to do for himself with only ten dollars in his picket. First, commenced clerking in a drug store at Winchester, Scott county. Remained there a few months then went to Alton, where, for a short time, he clerked in the Post Office. A year after moved to Jerseyville. In the fall of 1860 went to Centralia, Illinois; in March, 1861, moved to V_?_, Indiana. In August, 1862, enlisted as a private in the Seventh Regiment Indiana Infantry. In November following, was promoted to a first lieutenancy. After the battle of Shiloh, for meritorious services, was commissioned to captain of a battery by Governor Morton; was in command of that battery until Sherman’s march to Atlanta; was then promoted to major of the Tenth Indiana Calvary. While participating in the battle of Nashville, the gallant major was wounded, soon after which he was appointed lieutenant colonel, and, after the battle of Blakely, was promoted to the rank of colonel. He participated in many hard-fought battles, prominent among which was Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge, and Nashville, and numerous skirmishes. He remained in the service until the 6th of September, 186?. In October, 186?, he was married to Miss Hannah V. Davis, daughter of the late Abijah Davis, of Jerseyville. The colonel is now a partner in the banking house of Cross & Swallow. His first vote for president was cast for Abraham Lincoln, to which party he has strictly adhered. Few, if any, of the citizens of Jersey county, achieved a more brilliant military record during the late rebellion than Colonel Swallow. His is among the prominent and influential citizens of the county.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


James G. SWAN was born at Fort Chambers, in the present limits of St. Clair County, Ill., February 12, 1814. He is the third son of Francis and Elizabeth Swan, who were natives of North Carolina. They were married in Christian county, Kentucky, in 1809, and the same year emigrated to Illinois and settled in St. Clair county. He (F. Swan) was one of the home guards, called in those early times “Rangers,” and resided in St. Clair county till the fall of 1823, when he settled in Greene county, near Carrollton, where he lived three years, when he removed to township 7, range 11, where he resided till his death, which occurred about the year 1850. His wife died in the fall of 1845. Mr. Swan had a family of nine children – five sons and four daughters – five of whom are still living. They were born in the following order: James G., residing on section 6, township 6, range 11; Mary, present wife of Jacob Butt, of township 7, range 11; John P., of the same township; Elizabeth, present wife of Wm. Rhodes, of township 6, range 11; and Sophronia, present wife of C. S. Whitcomb, residing near San Francisco, Ca. Mr. Swan and wife were active members of the M. E. church. They won the respect of a large circle of friends and acquaintances with whom they were associated in life. The subject of this sketch made the first settlement on the farm where he now resides in the fall of 1833. He now has about one hundred acres in fruits of various kinds, constituting the most extensive fruit farm in Jersey county, and perhaps second to none (according to its area) in the state. Mr. Swan has achieved a marked popularity as a fruit grower throughout the county and state. He was married October 30, 1839, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Matthew and Nancy Ralston, of Todd county, Kentucky. They have had five children, three of whom are still living, viz.: Alonzo F., residing near his father; John who is also residing near his father; and James B., residing with his father. His first wife died June 3, 1851. He was again married to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Henry and Mary Rhodes, of Kentucky, formerly of Virginia. By this union they have had two children, Mary Elizabeth and Francis Henry, both residing with their parents. Mr. Swan is one of the early settlers of the county, and has an enviable record as a horticulturist throughout the state. Politically, he is an advocate of the principles of the republican party, and during the late rebellion was a staunch supporter of the Union cause. Two of his sons served in the Union army. Mr. S. gave his first vote for General Harrison. He voted twice for A. Lincoln, and once for U. S. Grant, and expects to support the illustrious General again in the pending election. A lithographic view of his farm residence appears elsewhere in this work. [See 1872 Farms & Residences]

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Madison TERRELL was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, December 10, 1808. He was the youngest of a family of nine children of Thomas and Mary Terrell, who were also natives of New Jersey. The ancestors were English and Irish. Mr. Terrell was educated in his native county, and most of his early boyhood was spent on his father’s farm, assisting in the farm labor. He was married on the 7th of March, 1832, to Miss Mary C. Stelle, daughter of Isaac and Rachel Stelle, who were old residents of that state, having come from France and settled in New Jersey soon after the revolutionary war. After his marriage, Mr. Terrell farmed the old homestead a few years, and then purchased a farm in Morris county, New Jersey, where he resided ten years; then sold his property, and removed, with his family, to Illinois, arriving in Jersey county in April, 1850. About five years after he purchased the farm on which the family reside, southeast of Jerseyville. By economy and industry he succeeded in accumulating sufficient property to make home pleasant. Mr. Terrell and wife had seven children, five of whom are still living, all residents of Illinois. Mr. T. became a member of the Baptist Church previous to his marriage, and Mrs. Terrell joined the same church in the winter of 1850. In politics, he was an earnest worker and advocate of the principles of the democratic party. He died at his residence on the 14th of July, 1861, beloved and respected by all his friends. He was a gentleman who was frequently spoken of for his kindness and benevolence of heart, and the purity of his Christian character and straightforward rectitude in all his dealings. His widow and some of their children are residing at the old homestead.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Jasper M. TERRY was born in Hardin county, Kentucky, January 5, 1811. He is the fifth child of Jasper and Sarah Terry; the father was a native of Botetourt county, Virginia, and the mother (Miss Sarah Fuller) a native of Peekskill, New York. Her father, Northrup Fuller, settled in Botetourt county, Virginia, in 1784. Jasper Terry was married in 1797. He emigrated to Kentucky in the fall of 1800, where he resided till the fall of 1828, when he came to Illinois, and settled in the present limits of Jersey county, on the northeast quarter of section 24, township 7, range 12, where he resided till 1849, when he sold his farm, and after a visit to Texas returned to Greene county, Illinois, where he died in November, 1850, at the residence of his oldest daughter, Elizabeth, wife of Rev. John Stephens. His wife died at the same place about one year after. Mr. Terry had a family of twelve children, nine sons and three daughters. Nine of his family attained mature years, and eight (five sons and three daughters) are still living. Mr. Terry, his wife, and most of his family, are members of the Baptist church. Jasper M. Terry obtained his early education in the common schools of Hardin county. He came to Illinois with his father’s family, and was married, September 20, 1833, to Miss Mary Ann Wagner, daughter of John and Mary Wagner, residing southeast of Carrollton, Illinois. By this union they have had twelve children, nine sons and three daughters, three of whom died in infancy. Those living are in the following order of birth, viz: Rev. John W., now residing at Carlinville, Illinois; William H., and Anslam, residing in Montgomery county, Illinois; Albert O., located near Zanesville, Illinois; Henry Clay, near Pana, Illinois; Mary Emma, present wife of E. D. Howard, of Montgomery county, Illinois; Thomas Jefferson, Theodore F., and Anne Frances, residing with their parents. Mr. Terry, soon after his marriage, settled on the northwest quarter of section 24, township 7, range 12, where he now resides. He has made farming the business of his life, and the legitimate result of minding his business has been success. His farm is one of the best in the township. A view of his farm residence appears elsewhere in this work. [See 1872 Farms & Residences] Mr. Terry began life without financial capital, but he possessed those elements of mind which are more valuable, and the proper use of which result in success to their possessor. These qualities are good, common sense, unerring judgment to plan, and energy to execute, with order and method. Such was the capital, in part, of the subject of this sketch. He has raised a large family, to whom he had given the advantages of a liberal education, as well as such financial aid as will facilitate their life labors. He settled four of his sons on one thousand acres of land in Montgomery county, Illinois, near Zanesville. His oldest son is a good, classical scholar. Politically, Mr. Terry was an “old line Whig.” He was a great admirer of the distinguished Henry Clay, after whom one of his sons was christened. Although he has never sought official position, he has served several years as an acting justice of the peace. He was elected associate judge of the county court of Jersey county, which position he filled from 1850 to 1857, with credit to himself and satisfaction to his fellow-citizens. He is esteemed by all who have the pleasure of his acquaintance.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Judge Cyrus TOLMAN is a native of Bridgewater, Plymouth county, Massachusetts. He was born on the 3d day of December, 1793. He is thefifth of a family of seven children of Captain Daniel and Chloe B. Tolman, who were also natives of the “Bay State,” and were of English descent. Mr. Tolman, father of the above, was a soldier in the war of the revolution, after which he returned to the tilling of his farm in Massachusetts. His death occurred on the old homestead. During life he was an active member of the Baptist church. Judge Tolman, subject of the present article, was educated in the schools of his native town, attaining a good knowledge of the rudiments of an English education. After attaining the age of nineteen his father gave him his time. He then went to operating in a cotton factory at Pawtucket, Rhode Island, where he remained about one year. In April, 1815, he went to Trenton, New Jersey. He was an operative in a factory at that place for about two years. During that time he had accumulated about five hundred dollars. He then determined (in his own language) “to come west and buy a piece of land,” and in November, 1817, he left New Jersey and went to Utica, Indiana, where he engaged in manufacturing brick one year, in which enterprise he lost all his money. He then worked out one month in order to get money to make a trip to Illinois. He took passage on a flat boat, and after arriving at Jeffersonville, was there ice-bound, and could proceed in the boat no farther. He there abandoned the boat, and, with a pack on his back, started on foot across the country, wading through the snows of that cold December. He landed at Edwardsville, Illinois, in 1818. His brother, Daniel Tolman, was a resident of that place. Mr. T.’s first employment was assisting in the survey of the town of Gibralter, the land being formerly owned by Gov. Carlin, who sold out to Buckmaster and Prickott. In August of the same year he was prostrated with the ague, which unfitted him for work until January, 1820. He spent the next year working on a farm, from which he saved one hundred and seventy-five dollars. He then entered a piece of land in close proximity to where the town of White Hall now stands, in Greene county. He settled on the farm in April, 1821. In 1819 he helped take rock in a keel boat from Alton to Gibralter. There was then only one log cabin where lower Alton now stands. The Judge framed, and assisted by Col. Gregory, built the first two frame buildings in Greene county, in August, 1821. He framed two boats at the mouth of Apple creek, for a Mr. Talbot, and that enabled him to earn sufficient money to purchase another eighty acres of land; and then, in partnership with Col. Gregory, he worked at putting up log houses for the settlers in different parts of the county, until his marriage, which occurred January 30, 1823, to Miss Polly Eldred, daughter of Jehoshaphat and Polly Eldred, who were also pioneer settlers of Greene county, they having settled in that county in the fall of 1820, removing from Winfield, New York. After his marriage, Mr. Tolman engaged in improving his farm. About 1830 he was electedassessor and treasurer of Greene and Macoupin counties, receiving for his services seventy-five dollars. Soon after, he was elected county judge of Greene county, and held that office four terms, or eight years. In 1840 he moved to Jersey county, and purchased a farm about three miles north of Jerseyville, where he has since resided. In the fall of 1840, he was elected one of the county commissioners to fill a vacancy, and was elected to the same office at the next regular term. Mr. Tolman and wife have had six children, four of whom are yet living. All his children are married and well settled in life, each owning a good farm. As a farmer Judge Tolman has been successful; indeed, he is a man who possesses the happy faculty of making a success of whatever he undertakes, and he thoroughly understands the secret of success in business. Few of the old settlers came to this state under more trying circumstances. In the cold snows of a dreary winter he landed upon its soil, almost barefoot, and the next yearwas prostrated by sickness; but the true and manly heart that beat in his bosom was not dismayed. Few can appreciate to-day the many privations and hardships that young man was called to endure; but possessing an indomitable will and energy, he was enabled to carve out of the rough material a handsome competence to enjoy in his old age. Few of the old settlers of this portion of the state had to endure more hardships and inconveniences than he. The Indians and wild animals had hardly yet given up their claims when he became a settler on the prairies. In 1821, Judge Tolman served on the first grand jury ever held in Greene county, and half a century after, in 1871, he served as foreman of the grand jury of Jersey county. His venerable wife and partner for many long happy years, died October 17, 1860. Politically, in early life Judge Tolman was a member ofthe whig party, and acted with that party until the Fremont campaign of 1856, when he became a democrat, and has since acted with the democratic party. Few men are living to-day who have witnessed so many events in the glorious history of Illinois as Judge Tolman. For several years he was a captain of the militia. In the life of Judge Tolman we can learn many encouraging lessons. His purity of character and nobility of principles are too well known to need mention at our hands. He is a man of generous impulses and of a hospitable nature, and has the kind regards of a large circle of friends.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Gaston D. TWITCHELL was born in New Haven, Addison county, Vermont, January 1, 1819. He is the oldest son of John and Anna Twitchell, who were both natives of Vermont. They had a family of eight children, in the following order of birth, viz: Gaston D., residing on the northeast quarter of section 13, township 9, range 10, the old homestead where his father first settled, forty years ago; Mary Ann, present wife of Augustus Stearns, of Litchfield, Illinois; Lydia, residing with her mother and the subject of this sketch; Janette, deceased in youth; Lottie, present wife of Joseph Chamberlain, residing near Virden, Illinois; Jane, present wife of John Ryan of the same township, near Virden; Sidney L., also near Virden; and H. Lorane, residing with her mother and oldest brother. John Twitchell, with his family of seven children, emigrated to Illinois, and settled in Greene county, southwest of Whitehall, in the summer of 1831. He removed to where his wife and the subject of this sketch now reside. He died August 10th of the same year (1833), his death being one of the first in the township. Gaston D. Twitchell has devoted his entire life, thus far, to agriculture. He is at this time one of the good, substantial farmers in the community in which nearly forty years of his life have been devoted to providing for the wants of those left in youth to his care, in common with the widowed mother. He is highly respected by all who have the pleasure of his acquaintance.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page

No surnames tagged for this post.