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1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page

Biographies in the
Atlas Map of Jersey County, Illinoisby Andreas, Lyter & Co., Davenport, IA, 1872

Clarence M. HAMILTON was born in Franklin county, Vermont, June 5, 1826. He is the seventh child of William and Lydia Hamilton. The death of Mrs. Hamilton (formerly Lydia Trask) occurred May 10, 1828. Mr. Hamilton, with his family of three sons, emigrated west in the fall of 1830, and settled in the present limits of Jersey county on the northeast quarter of section 13, township 7, range 12, west of the third principal meridian, where he improved a farm, and followed farming as a specialty during the remainder of his active life. He was an active, energetic man, and highly esteemed by all who were really acquainted with his virtues. His brother, Dr. Silas Hamilton, was also one of the pioneer settlers; he is noted for his philanthropy and liberal provision in behalf of the citizens of OtterCreek, now Otterville, and the educational facilities he furnished the settlement were not surpassed in the early settlements of our western towns. William Hamilton died at the residence of Jephtha Dixon, in Calhoun county, Ill., July 22, 1849. The subject of this sketch received his early education in Otterville, Illinois. He followed farming in his early life, except one year devoted to mining in the lead mines in Wisconsin. He began his mercantile career in the spring of 1847 at Gilead, Calhoun county, Illinois. He sold out to his brother, Wm. D. Hamilton, in March, 1849, and for two years was engaged as deputy sheriff of Calhoun county. In the spring of 1851 he was associated in the firm of Child & Hamilton, at Hardin, Illinois, in merchandise, officiating, in the meantime, as county surveyor, to which office he was elected, and also, the same year, appointed assessor of Calhoun county by the county court, and performed the duties of said office. He was the same year elected justice of the peace, and filled the office until he removed from the county. The firm of Child & Hamilton was dissolved in the spring of 1853, and the following spring Mr. H. removed to Jerseyville, where he has since resided. He first engaged in a dry goods and grocery trade. After a short time he became a member of the firm of Bagley, Hurd, & Co., in which business he continued until August, 1856, when he became a member of the firm of Johnson & Hamilton, in the livery business. He disposed of his interest in the mercantile house in the fall of the same year, and disposed of his livery interest in May, 1857. About this time he was elected alderman, and also city clerk. During the summer of 1857 he settled his brother’s estate in Calhoun county, Illinois. In March, 1859, he was engaged in the firm of Hamilton & Jett, at Jerseyville, in the wholesale and retail grocery business, which he continued until June, 1860, when he became sole proprietor, continuing until June, 1865, when he accepted Morris H. Locke as a partner, and continued the business under the firm of Hamilton & Locke until October, 1866, when he bought out Mr. Locke, continuing the business alone until February, 1867. Mr. Hamilton accepted Joseph G. Marston as a partner, and continued in the firm of Hamilton & Marston until October, 1871, when he bought out the interest of Mr. Marston, and associated his son, Edward A. Hamilton, with him, and, in the firm of Hamilton & Son, he is now largely engaged at Jerseyville, in the sale of groceries, paints, oils, &c. In addition to his mercantile interest at Jerseyville, Mr. Hamilton, in 1861, opened a store at Otter Creek (now Otterville), which he continued one and a half years. He associated himself, not long since, with S. R. Rogers, and the firm of Hamilton & Rogers, at Otterville, is among the present well known business firms of Jersey county Mr. Hamilton commenced pork packing at Jerseyville on his own account in the fall of 1862, which he has since continued, acquiring a high reputation in the cure of meats. We have remarked that Mr. Hamilton was elected alderman and city clerk in 1857; he was re-elected to both positions in 1859, and elected alderman in 1871. It is but a just tribute to the subject of this sketch to say that he is an upright business man,and as a citizen, benevolent and public-spirited.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Dr. J. O. HAMILTON was born in Monroe county, Illinois, April 2nd, 1824. He is the youngest child of Thomas M. and Alphia Hamilton. Mr.Hamilton was born in Rutland, Vermont, of Scotch and English parentage. Captain Nathaniel Hamilton, his father, commanded a company of Green mountain boys during the revolutionary war. The grandparents of the Hamiltons and Browns left Hartford, New York, on the 19th of September, 1796, and traveled with teams to the Monongahela river, just below its confluence with the Youghiogheny, where they encamped for the winter, there being no wagon road below Fort Duquesne. They disposed of their teams, and during the winter of 1796 and 1797 employed their time in constructing a flat-boat, which they loaded with their goods, and on the opening of navigation started down the river. On the 11th or February, 1797, they made their boat fast at the mouth of the Muskingum river, at a point on the Ohio called Point Harmner, out from which they made a settlement. Thomas McClure Hamilton was the first child of Nathaniel Hamilton and Betsey McClure Hamilton; and Nathaniel Hamilton was the first child of Elisha Hamilton and Mary Smith. She was born at Brookfield, Worcester county, Massachusetts. Elisha Alphia Brown was born at Hartford, Washington county, New York, on the 7th of June, 1788, and was the seventh child of Capt. Benjamin Brown. Jean Thomas Brown was born October 17th, 1745, at Leicester, Massachusetts, and was the first son of John Brown and Mary Jones. Jean Thomas, the wife of Benjamin Brown, was born in America, but her father was from Wales. Mary Jones, wife of John Brown, was born in Scotland. Mary Smith, wife of Elisha Hamilton, was born in Ireland. The Hamiltons were, since the time of “Mary Queen of Scots,” English, but before that time the family were Scotch. At the time of the disturbance between England and Scotland, in the time of “Queen Mary,” the family passed over to England. Captain Benjamin Brown joined the first regiment of minute men raised in Massachusetts in the spring of 1775, under Colonel Washburne, in which he acted as lieutenant and adjutant. He was present and took part in the battle of Bunkerhill, after which he was commissioned a captain in Colonel Jackson’s regiment of the main line in the army, of which Dr. John Brooks, afterwards governor of Massachusetts, was lieutenant colonel. They participated in many other battles of the revolutionary contest. In the memorable winter of 1777 and 1778, at Valley Forge, he participated in the hardships of the campaign. Thomas M. Hamilton landed with his family at Harrisonville, Illinois, on the east bank of the Mississippi river, on the 1st of May, 1818, and located in what is now New Design, Monroe county, four miles southest of Waterloo. On the 9th of May, 1831, he moved to the present limits of Jersey county, and settled on a tract of land in Township 7, Range 12, and there carried on farming during the remainder of his life. Such, in brief, is the lineal descent of the ancestors of the subject of this sketch. Dr. Hamilton attended school first in Monroe county, Illinois, and then at the stone school house built at Otterville through the munificence of Dr. Silas Hamilton. In 1843, he became a student at the Ohio university, at Athens, Ohio; remained there two years; when there commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Silas Parker. The latter moving from Athens, Dr. Hamilton continued the study with Dr. William Blackstone. In 1845, he came to Jerseyville and practiced under Dr. James C. Perry, who was originally from Scotland; he was a gentleman of polish and fine attainments. Dr. H. practiced with him a year and then located in Calhoun county, Illinois. In 1847, he returned to Jersey county, and taught school in what was locally known as Buttermilk Academy, situated on Section 2, Township 7, Range 11. In the early part of 1847, he went to Louisiana, and got a situation as teacher after waiting for them to build a school house, which was constructed of gum logs, and the planks sawn by negro power; he taught in Tensas parish, on Tensas river, at $35 per month in gold, board included.In 1849, he returned to Jersey county; attended lectures at the medical universitv of Missouri, graduating on the 4th of March, 1840, and commenced practice in Grafton. On the 1st of May, 1851, he was marrried to Margarette Perry, daughter of Dr. Perry, of Jerseyville. They have had six children, three of whom are deceased, and one daughter and two sons yet living. In 1851, he entered into partnership with his father-in-law, which existed till January, 1853. Dr. Perry died in 1858. Dr. Hamilton has long since been recognized as among the learned and scientific physicians of Illinois. Some of his essays have been incorporated in the transactions of time American Medical Association, and can be found in the volumes of 1870 and 1872. The Doctor has attained these positions as the result of his ability and education. In October, 1867, he received a patent for an obstetric bandage from the United States patent office. He was elected president of the Illinois Medical Society convened at Peoria, in May, 1871, being the first native president from Illinois. Dr. Hamilton has been successful, and that is the criterian in judging men. He says he has not been absent from his practice thirty days at a time in twenty-one years. He has attended as a delegate the American Medical Association at Cincinnati, New Orleans, Washington, Philadelphia, and San Francisco, California. In 1867, he was appointed surgeon for the United States pension office of this district, and is likewise examining physician for six of the most prominent insurance companies in the United States. Dr. Hamilton performed the first ovarian operation ever performed in this partof Illinois. Such, in brief, is the narative of the life of Dr. Hamilton, a man whose ability and industry have stamped him among the celebrated physicians of the west.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Rev. James HARTY was born in Waterford county, Ireland, in December, 1836. He received his classical education at Mount Mellery, and wnet through his Theological course at Hall Halloes’ College, in the city of Dublin. He emigrated to this country in October, 1862, and was ordained, in the city of Alton, Illinois, December 4th, 1863. His first pastoral labors were in the Alton Cathedral, where he remained until August 15th, 1868, when he came to Jerseyville, where he now remains. His labors as pastor of St. Francis’ Church have been arduous and valuable to his charge. The beautiful edifice (a view of which appears elsewhere in this work) cost about twenty thousand dollars, and is the most commodious and elegant church building in the county. [See 1872 Farms & Residences] Its erection is the result of the pastor’s energy and the munificent donations of its membership. Father Harty is a gentleman of fine literary culture, and is among the well read Theologians of the church to which he is attached.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


James T. HAUSKINS was born in Greene county, Illinois, on the 7th of April, 1823. He is the fourth child of William and Elizabeth Hauskins, who were natives of Anderson county, Tennessee. They emigrated to Madison county, Illinois, where they remained about one year, and then removed to Greene county, Illinois, settling near the present site of Carrollton. Mr. Hauskins was among the pioneers of the county of Greene, in which he followed farming with energy and success until his death, which occurred at this residence, August 23d, 1857, aged fifty-nine years. His wife died several years previous. She was a woman of extraordinary good qualities. Of their family of six children, three are still living – Clayton, a citizen of Bourbon county, Kansas; the subject of this sketch, residing in Fidelity, Illinois; and Elizabeth, present wife of William Bowker, of Macoupin county (near Fidelity). Mr. Hauskins was one of the early settlers of Greene county, and was highly esteemed by a large circle of acquaintances.
     James T. Hauskins received his early education in the common schools of his native county. On the 3d of June, 1852, he was married to Miss Emily Clark, daughter of Absalom Clark, who was one of the early settlers of Greene county. They had seven children, all deceased but two – Edgar and James, who are residing with their parents. After his marriage, Mr. Hauskins engaged in farming in the precinct of Fidelity, where he still resides. About the year 1856 he commenced mercantile business in the village of Fidelity, and continued the same until 1870, when he took a stock of goods to Ottawa, Kansas. He continued trade at the latter place until February, 1871, when he returned to his family in Fidelity. He is now residing in the village (having rented his farm in the neighborhood), for the superior educational advantages which the village is now able to furnish. Mr. Hauskins is an official member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, with which he has been connected for nearly twenty years, and his wife is also a zealous and active member of the same church. He is highly esteemed for his many virtues as a Christian man and public spirited citizen.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


William S. HAWLEY was born in Onondaga county, New York, December 7, 1818. He is the third of a family of nine children of Samuel P. and Hannah Hawley. Mr. Hawley, father of the above, was born at Milford, Connecticut, October 6, 1780, and Mrs. Hawley was born at Chesterfield, New Hampshire, October 24, 1791. Their ancestors were English, and were lineally descended from the old Puritan stock who settled the New England colonies. Mr. Hawley’s occupation was that of a merchant and farmer. He came to Illinois in the spring of 1836, and located in Madison county, where he resided one year, and then removed to the present limits of Jersey county, and purchased the farm on which Hugh N. Cross, Esq, now resides. Mr. Hawley and wife were both members of the Episcopal church. He died September 10th, 1855, at Jerseyville, and was buried with masonic honors. Mrs. Hawley died February 29th, 1856.
     The subject of this sketch received his early education in the schools of his native county, acquiring a good business education. His time was spent alternately at school and on his father’s farm until he came west, which was in September, 1836. He located in Jersey county. At the age of thirty-two he was married to Miss Caroline Fisher, daughter of Cornelius B. and Hannah M. Fisher, old residents of the county. Mr. Hawley and wife have had four children, three daughters and one son. After his marriage, Mr. H. moved on the farm which he had previously purchased, and agricultural pursuits claimed his attention for many years. During his farming operations he improved four farms. He commenced life with a small capital, and by perseverence and industry has acquired a comfortable competence, and is now surrounded with all the conveniences necessary for the enjoyment of life. His first vote was given for Henry Clay. During the late rebellion he was a strong Union man. For several years he has acted with the democratic party. Mr. H. is among the older residents of Jersey county, and his highly respected. He is never at a loss for a witty answer, and few can appreciate a joke better than Mr. Hawley. He is on of those genial, wholesouled, clever gentlemen whom all are pleased to meet. A few years since he retired from his farm and purchased one of the finest properties in Jerseyville, where he now resides. He is also engaged quite largely in laying before the public a fine and elaborate style of furniture. [See
1872 Farms & Residences]

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Adam HAYNE is a native of Rockingham county, Virginia, born June 24, 1809. He is the second of a family of five children of Frederic and Barbara Hayne, who were also natives of the “Old Dominion.” Frederic Hayne’s occupation was that of a farmer. He was for a short time in the war of 1812. He removed, with his family to Preble county, Ohio, in October, 1828, and about three weeks after they arrived there Mr. Hayne died. The next spring his widow purchased a farm. She survived the death of her husband until 1859, remaining all that time a widow. They were of German descent.
     The subject of this sketch received his early education in the district schools of Virginia, and removed, with his parents, to Ohio at the above mentioned date, and in Preble county was married, April 7, 1835, to Miss Nancy A. Hollenshead, daughter of James and Catherine Hollenshead. They were among the pioneer settlers of that portion of Ohio. They had a family of six children, of whom five are yet living. When Mr. Hayne commenced life he had but a small capital, but being a man of energy, he set about to acquire a home for himself and family. He had purchased a small farm previous to his marriage, which he occupied and improved. In the fall of 1846 he came to Illinois, and settled, with his family, on the farm where he now resides, about three miles northeast of the city of Jerseyville. When he arrived in this state, he had not money enough to commence farming with; but with the energy and pluck characteristic of the old settlers, he went to work, and succeeded in acquiring considerable wealth. He has now a fine farm, containing upward of seven hundred acres of the most valuable land in the county. His farm is under a good state of cultivation and well improved. A man of such energy and straightforward business talents, accomplishing what he has under very adverse circumstances, cannot but merit the respect and esteem of his fellow-citizens. Mrs. Hayne died at their residence in September, 1854. Mr. H. was married to Miss Helen Hunt, of New York, his present wife, in September, 1858, by whom he has had a family of four children, three of whom are yet living. Mr. Hayne and wife are both members of the Second Presbyterian Church of Jerseyville. Politically, in early life he became a strong admirer of the old Jeffersonian and Jacksonian principles of democracy, to which he has strictly adhered. His first vote was cast for Andrew Jackson, since which time he has followed in the footsteps of the illustrious general, and now things he can vote with a free conscience for Horace Greeley. Mr. Hayne is among the prominent farmers of Jersey county, and is one of its solid financial men. He is a gentleman who is highly respected by his fellow-citizens for his benevolence and hospitality, and his many Christian and manly virtues.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Hon. George W. HERDMAN is a native of Rockland county, New York, and was born March 6th, 1839. He is one of a family of eight children of William J. and J. J. Herdman. Mr. Herdman removed with his family to Randolph county, Illinois, in the spring of 1842. In the fall of 1854 he located in Jersey county. The subject of this sketch spent his early boyhood on his father’s farm, and the advantages for his earliest culture were such as the common schools afforded, and the balance of his literary attainments were obtained at home, evenings, studying by lamplight, and under these circumstances he succeeded in acquiring a sound English education, and when about the age of twenty-four he commenced the study of law, in the office of Judge Woodson, of Carrolton, for a period of two years, after which he attended a full course in the law department of the University ofLouisville, Kentucky, and in the spring of 1867, he received a diploma from that institution, and in June of the same year Mr. Herdman opened a law office in Jerseyville. Soon after he became a partner in the firm of King & Pinero. Said partnership was formed in July, 1867, and in October following Mr. King left the firm, and in 1869 Mr. Herdman bought out Mr. Pinero, and soon after formed a partnership with Robert M. Knapp. In the fall of 1870 Mr. H. was elected, as the candidate of the democratic party, to a seat in the legislature, as representative from Jersey and Calhoun counties. He filled that position with honor to himself and general satisfaction to his constituents. Soon after he located in practice in Jerseyville he was elected city attorney. In Mr. Herdman, we find in the composition of his intellect those essential traits necessary for thesuccessful lawyer, concentrative powers of a high order, coupled with a good knowledge of human nature, sound judgment, and an untiring energy, and while eminently qualified for the bar, he yet will, in the opinion of his friends, shine as a bright star in the political galaxy.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


George HOFFMAN was born in Philadelphia, September 5th, 1792. He is the son of David and Barbara Hoffman, who were natives of Pennsylvania, and of German descent. David Hoffman had a family of seven children – two sons and five daughters – all deceased except the subject of this sketch, who is the second child, and his sister Margaret, the fourth child, also a resident of Jersey county. Mr. H. died in 1812, and his wife in 1825.
     The subject of this sketch worked with his father at shoemaking until he was seventeen years of age, when he learned the trade of brush-making, which he followed for some time. He was for a short time engaged in the last war with Great Britain, and was married in 1821, to Miss Margaret Paid, of his native county. They had a family of two children, one son and one daughter, both deceased. His wife died in the fall of 1823, and afterwards he was married to Miss Elizabeth Paid, sister of his former consort. By this marriage he was the father of two sons – Jacob P., residing in Missouri, and Henry J., residing near his father, on section 33, township 8, range 10. His second wife died in the spring of 1847, and he was again married, to Miss Mary, daughter of John and Theresa Kollenborn, of Madison county, Illinois. They have had two children – Caroline, residing with her parents, and George L., who is studying medicine with Dr. Kingston, of Fidelity. In the spring of 1835, Mr. Hoffman settled on section 28, township 8, range 10, where he now resides. He is one of the early settlers, and, by his energy and force of character, has overcome difficulties and made life a success. He lives to see his children comfortably settled around him, and ornaments to the society in which they live. Mr. Hoffman is held in high estimation by all who are acquainted with him.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Judge J. Montgomery HURD was born at Georgetown, Madison County, New York, March 1. 1809. He was the second of a family of seven children of Ezra and Polly Hamilton Hurd, respectively of English and Scotch-Irish ancestry.

Ezra Hurd, being a man of active business qualities, successfully carried on (with farming) the business of grist and saw mill operations, united with the charge and ownership of a brewery. On the breaking out of the War of 1812 with England’s boasted prowess, the versatile, go-ahead “New Yorker” of early times, was at the head of a volunteer company, and promptly tendered his services to the government at Sackett’s Harbor, New York. In 1831 he and his family located in what is now Jersey County; but before they had made a permanent settlement, he and his help-mate were the victims of a malarious disease common to the new prairie country; he dying September 31st [stet], at the age of 50, and she in November, aged 47.

Bethel Hurd, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was also an active patriot, participating at the battle of Bennington, Vermont, and in the various campaigns in the War for Independence, 1776. He, at an advanced age, died in 1818, after leaving a farm to each of his children, selected on the bank of Otcelic Creek, a branch of the river Susquehanna.

Judge Hurd, as a scholar in the winter terms of the common school, at Georgetown, became proficient in mathematics and the branches of an English education, including the practical branch of surveying. At the age of fourteen years his father placed him in charge of the saw mill. In summer, at low water, the farm again had his active services. At the age of seventeen, he spent a fall and winter at learning the cloth dressing trade, with Scott Burns, thus until the spring of 1830, when, now being twenty-one years of age, he pioneered his way to the state of Illinois. His route was by raft from the headwaters of the Allegheny to Cincinnati, thence by steamboat to Herculaneum, Missouri. From there he crossed over to Monroe County, where he met his uncle, Dr. Silas Hamilton, at the residence of a cousin, Thomas Hamilton.

On the next day a wolf hunt was projected, a wolf having during the night killed several sheep. About sundown the Judge, with his three cousins, came up to the wolf’s retreat, a cave on the banks of a stream, on a ledge of rock twenty feet high. Being too late for business that night, intrepid hunters slept in the entrance of the cave! In this daring way they imprisoned the wolf for the night! At early dawn Daniel Hamilton crawled into the cave, until he confronted the wolf, eyeballs blazing defiance, and uttering growls of vengeance as she hovered over the forms of four cubs. Two shots from his rifle laid the wolf low, and almost suffocated our hero with the gunpowder smoke. To bring the wolf out to daylight our huntsmen attached a pole to a rope made out of “paw-paw” bush, which being secured to the hind leg of the wolf, brought the animal forth amongst them, pulling at the pole–but to their surprise she was up ready for a desperate fight. Another shot from Daniel, through the wolf’s head, ended the exciting scene. Five wolf scalps were the fruits of their victory. Such is one of the many incidents the early pioneers love to recite to their grand-children of these “new-fangled” modern times, as they bemoan the obliteration of the landmarks of the past beneath the hurrying tread of “Young America.”

On the 3rd of June, with his uncle, Dr. Silas Hamilton, he moved to Otter Creek prairie. St. Louis, at that early day, was a village when they stopped there on their route. In Jersey County he worked for his uncle until the latter part of July, when he was prostrated with bilious fever. After his recovery, on the 22d of September, he returned, by stage, to New York. The country then through the middle states was so wild that, while at Edwardsville, New York, stopping over night, he could hear the wolves howling over newly-made graves of those having died of malarious diseases. In the spring of 1831, the Judge returned to Illinois, by the water route, with his father’s family; this time being detained several days by the Cold Spring Indians, at Olean Point, New York.

At Eminence, a few miles above the Big Piasa, they hired a team and wagoned it to Otter Creek prairie. It was that fall his parents died. After he had built a log house, where Otterville now stands, he spent most of his time until 1837, at surveying. He surveyed Grafton, and most all the towns of Jersey county except Jerseyville, besides guiding settlers to new farms being purchased. In 1833 he was elected constable; in 1835, justice of the peace. On January 26, 1836, he was married to Miss Lydia Noble, daughter of Henry and Polly Noble, natives to Maryland – Mrs. H being a native of Mississippi.

Three of their eight children are now living – two daughters and a son – all living in Nebraska. Lucinda, the eldest, is the wife of James D. Russell. He was one of the heirs of the late Wm. Russell, of St. Louis, Jennie T. is the wife of Captain Charles A. Holmes, who was captain of a company in the 29th Regiment Wisconsin volunteers. Frank P. is a student at the State University, Lincoln, Nebraska.

Until 1838, when he was elected surveyor of Greene County, of which Jersey County was then a part, he presided over his farm on Otter Creek, which he began to improve shortly before his marriage, besides attending to a little surveying, and the duties of his justiceship. From 1839 until 1847, he was postmaster at Otterville. The fall of 1847 saw him as probate justice of Jersey County. After serving two years, he personally managed his farm until 1852, when he was elected sheriff, and from thence has resided in Jerseyville up to the present time. From 1844 until 1859 he held a partnership in a store with C. M. Hamilton and M. E. Bagley. Selling out his share in the mercantile business in 1850, he filled the office of justice of the peace until November, 1869, when he was elected county judge, and has filled the office ably ever since.

In May, 1870, Mrs. Hurd died, at the place of their son-in-law, Mr. Russell (where Judge Powell [sic] now resides). In 1838 the Judge was appointed one of the committees to petition the legislature to divide Greene County and form Jersey County therefrom.

Politically, in early life he became a strong believer in the principles of the democratic party, to which he has steadfastly adhered through strife and storm. Although the opposition have carried the day through appeals to sectional prejudices, he still looks with confidence to the day when men, irrespective of party, free from the bitter spirit of partisanship, and whose motto is “pro bono publico”, and whose aim is the reconciliation of the turbulent masses, will again guide the Ship of State to the port of safety; that the sun will again shine on the American flag, upborne by an American mercantile navy, whose sails will once more whiten every sea, causing the heart of every American abroad to thrill with all the patriotic love and enthusiasm of a true American. Although the radical party, through sheer circumstances, and at the terrible price of human life and a great national debt, have carried out their ideas of political reform, the Judge, like the majority of the democratic party, abided by the results of the late war, and confidently hopes that “promised official reform” will be carried out in the fullest sense of the word, by whatever parties in power, and thus the stigma of American money-controlled legislators will cease to be the by-word of every European monarchy partisan, and thus the renowned halcyon days of Washington-ian purity and simplicity will again come to brighten the care-worn brow of our Columbia, and to refill the almost depleted wallet of our extravagant Brother Jonathan. Coming here and firmly grasping the lower rounds of the ladder of circumstances, Judge Hurd has steadfastly looked and toiled upward, until to-day he stands high in public appreciation as a private citizen, an honorable business man, the people’s faithful servant, and whose past course of public services will long be remembered by the pioneers and the present generation of Jersey County.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Josiah KING was born in Knox county (near Knoxville), Tennessee, February 24, 1817. He was the son of Mr. ___ King, an old citizen of Tennessee. Josiah received his early education in the common schools of his native state. He was first married to Miss Parthena Smith, of Tennessee, by which union he had a family of three children, two of whom are now living, viz: Phoebe, present wife of George Wagstaff, of Johnson county, Kansas, and Alexander, now a citizen of the same state. Mr. King came to Jersey county and settled near the village of Fieldon, where he resided about one year, when his wife died. He soon after engaged with Dr. Dorsey, of Jerseyville, and after this was employed in cropping for some time, when he became acquainted with and married, on October 5, 1848, Miss Sarah, fourth child of Isaac and Melinda Sinclair, who were among the early settlers of Madison county, and for many years residents of Greene, and now reside west of Jerseyville. In the spring of 1853 Mr. King moved to the farm where his wife now resides, one-half mile south of Fidelity, where he lived till the time of his death, which occurred May 24, 1863. Mr. King, by his last marriage, had six children, all living, viz: Joseph L., Mary Jane, Oliver Perry, Robert, Lucy, and Willie, all living with their mother. Mr. King was an upright, energetic citizen. He commenced life with small means, but by incessant and persevering toil acquired a good home for himself and family, and was esteemed by a large circle of friends and acquaintances.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


William D. LANDON, the fourth of a familty of nine children, was born in Addison county, Vermont, February 4th, 1813. His parents, Horace and Drusella Landon, were both of English descent. Horace Landon, whose occupation was that of a farmer, left Vermont with his family in 1834, and removed to the present limits of Jersey county, locating on a farm west of Jerseyville, where he died in 1857. His widow survived him until March, 1860. The subject of this sketch attained a good knowledge of the rudiments of an English education in the schools of his native state. He came to this state with his parents, at the time above stated, and entered a farm in Greene county, which he improved, and soon after sold. He then spent two years in traveling about, and, in March, 1837, was married to Mrs. Elvira Cowan, daughter of Zopher Cory, formerly from Addison county, Vermont, and also an old settler of this county. Mrs. Landon was born in 1814. They have had ten children, nine of whom are yet living – six married, and three single, the latter residing at home. Mr. Landon commenced life comparatively poor, but, with that indomitable energy which characterizes the man, has been enabled to accumulate considerable wealth. He is now one of the largest farmers of Jersey county, and is frequently spoken of for his industry, honesty, and strict integrity. He, like most of the old settlers of those early times, had to encounter many inconveniences and hardships which are incident to pioneer life, though these adverse circumstances did not discourage him, and he is ranked among the solid men of Jersey county. Early in life he became an advocate of the principles ofthe whig party. He voted first for General Harrison, and after the whig party became extinct, he joined the republicans, and puts upon record with pride the fact that he voted twice for Abraham Lincoln. During the late civil war he was a strong Union man. He says he proposes to vote again for U. S. Grant. Mr. Landon is among the older residents of the county, and is highly respected by a large circle of friends with whom he has acted for over thirty years.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


John LOCKE was born in Lancashire, England, April 18, 1816. He is the eldest son of William and Grace Locke, who were also natives of England. The had a family of five children, two sons and three daughters, all of whom are still living. Mr. Locke followed farming, and was among the substantial supporters of the English Church of his locality. He died in August, 1863; his wife about two years previous. The were highly esteemed by all who knew them, and the memory of their many virtues is cherished by a large circle of friends in the community where they resided.
     John Locke received his early instruction in the private schools of Devonshire, in which he obtained a good, practical, English education. He remained with his father till about twenty-three years of age, assisting him in his various farming operations. He emigrated to the United States in April, 1839, landing in the city of New York in the latter part of May. He soon left the city for Stafford, Genessee county, N. Y., where he spent the following summer. He felt a strong desire to follow the march of empire westward, and acting accordingly, landed in Alton, Ill., November 25, 1839. He was accompanied on his journey by two young men (brothers) who afterwards became his brothers-in-law. He arrived in Alton with a cash capital of seven dollars. His first object was to seek any honest employment that would afford him an occupation and a living, and, withal, increase his slender fortune, and so engaged in draying for a year. He was then employed as clerk in the store of G. Lamb, with whom he remained two or three years. In the fall of 1843 he returned to England, on a visit to his parents and the scenes of his childhood, where he remained till the next year (1844), when he returned to Alton and engaged in the grocery and provision trade, which he carried on till 1850, when he built his store on State street, and after conducting business about two years with a partner (J. Quarton), continued the business alone till 1855, when he formed a copartnership with his brother, Thomas Locke, and was largely engaged in this firm, dealing in groceries, provisions, and dry goods. The became largely engaged, also, in lime burning. Their manufacture and sale of lime was greater than any other parties in the Mississippi valley. The Alton lime, made by the Messrs. Locke, was known throughout the entire west. Their capacity for manufacture was one thousand barrels a day. Mr. Locke was the most extensive and successful lime burner in the west or northwest while he was engaged in the business. Since the sale of his lime manufacturing interests at Alton, he has visited many places, testing the qualities of limestone in different localities on the Mississippi and its tributaries, but thus far has not found any material (within the limits of his agreement not to manufacture) that will compete with that of Alton. Mr. Locke was married October 4, 1846, to Miss Elizabeth Challacombe, formerly of Devonshire, England, but residing, at the time of marriage, in Macoupin county, Ill. By this union they have had a family of nine children, six of whom are still living. His oldest daughter is the present wife of Richard C. Jones, who is a native of Devonshire, England. Mr. Locke takes pride in giving his family the advantages of a good education. He is a member of the Episcopal Church; his family, also, are members of the same. He declared his intention of becoming a citizen of our republic soon after his first settlement in Alton, and accordingly was naturalized, becoming a strong supporter of the whig party. His first vote was cast for General Harrison for president. On the disorganization of the whig party he became identified with the republicans. He voted twice for his old personal friend, Abraham Lincoln, for president, and subsequently for U. S. Grant, and looks forward with pleasing anticipation to the time when he can again support the illustrious General. He was a cordial supporter of the Union cause during the late rebellion. About this time he disposed of his lime manufacturing interests at Alton, and moved, with his family, on his farm in August, 1870, where he now resides. His energies are now directed to the improvement of his large farm of sixteen hundred acres, situated in the southeast portion of Jersey county, bordering on the Mississippi river. It is admirably well adapted to stock growing, as it is well watered, and also for fruit and grape culture, being contiguous to the St. Louis market and easily reached by water transportation. Although Mr. Locke came to Illinois with small means, he possessed that indomitable energy and perseverance which could not be easily daunted by the ordinary obstacles which are presented and must be overcome by labor to attain success. All this he manfully achieved, and his history, to any young man who has no capital but his hands, may be of great value, as it shows what is in the reach of human accomplishment when there is a determined will and energy to perform. His honest, straightforward career as a business man, coupled with his energy, cannot but raise him in the estimation of all who became familiar with the leading principles which have actuated him in life. His well known hospitality and his public spirit as a citizen are proverbial. He is one of that class of citizens in whose society one feels at home. By his courteous and urbane manners he has become endeared to a large circle of friends. As a self-made man, Mr. Locke needs no eulogy at our hands, the work of his past life speaking more eloquently than it would be possible for us in our present limits. A view of his residence, situated on the bluff of the Mississippi, appears elsewhere in this work. [See
1872 Farms & Residences]

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Note: _?_ indicates an unreadable word or words

Judge Richard I. LOWE was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, May 6, 1802. He was the only child of Isaac and Theodosia Lowe. There were English and Holland Dutch descent. Mrs. Lowe was a granddaughter of Gov. John Reding of the colonial government of New Jersey. Mr. Lowe’s occupation was that of a farmer. When Richard L. was a small boy, they moved to Lancaster county, Pennsylvania and in 1816 removed to Hunterton county, New Jersey. In the fall of 18??, he removed to Jersey county, Illinois, and died in the house of his son, Richard, in March 18??. Mrs. Lowe’s death occurred in Lancaster, Pennsylvania in _?_. Derrick Lowe, grandfather of the Judge, was among the early patriots of the revolutionary period; three of his sons and one son-in-law served in that patriotic army. His son-in-law, Bernardas Verberyck, was a colonel in the service, and Mr. Lowe’s son, Gilbert, was captain of a company of cavalry. Mr. Lowe, at that early day, was among the prominent men of New Jersey. His name headed a paper, among the first of his neighbors, the object of which was to give all the aid possible in the support of American freedom. He was a man of considerable wealth, and most all that he owned was given for the support of the army, except his farm. After peace was declared he resided on his farm until his death, which occurred about _?_. At this period of our country’s history it can but be a pleasure for those who are able to trace back their ancestorial lineage to the brave defenders of American liberty.

Judge Lowe received most of his education in the schools of New Jersey, and after leaving school spent several years with his father, Major Lowe, who was keeping hotel at Ringoes, New Jersey. When about twenty-six years of age, he was married to Miss Mary Diaborough, daughter of Daniel H. Diaborough, of Mill Stone, New Jersey. By this union he had one child. Soon after his marriage he engaged in merchandise at Ringoes. He was also the owner of a mill property east of Flemington, and kept store about four years. He then moved to Philadelphia, where he engaged in the grocery business, though soon after locating in the city, he turned his attention to speculating in real estate, in which _?_ he made some money. He then bought seven hundred acres of land in Jersey county, Illinois. Mrs. Lowe died at Ringeos, New Jersey, December 1, 18??. He was afterwards married to Miss Sarah Williamson, daughter of Abraham and Penelope Williamson, of Hunterton county, New Jersey. They have had a family of eleven children, six of whom are now living. He settled in Jersey county in the fall of 1847. Their son, Edwin Lowe, was a member of the 97th regiment Illinois volunteers, and while planting the flag on the fortification at Mobile, after the battle, was shot and mortally wounded, and died soon after. It was almost the last battle. In the fall of 18?? Mr. Lowe was elected county judge of Jersey county, being the candidate of the democratic party. He received every vote polled in the county excepting two; an _?_ which sufficiently attests the high appreciation in which Judge Lowe is held by his fellow citizens. His first vote for president was given to Andrew Jackson, and when that noble patriot, the Marquis De Lafayette, was on his visit to America, in 1827, and while stopping at Trenton, New Jersey, it was the privilege of Judge Lowe to take by the hand the illustrious visitor of the Brandywine. Judge Lowe commenced life with small means, but now has a good farm under a high state of cultivation and improvements, second to few in the county. He is highly respected for his generous and benevolent qualities, and is descended from one of the oldest families in New Jersey.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Jacob LURTON was born near Louisville, Kentucky, September 16, 1805. He is the fourth child of Jacob and Elizabeth Lurton. His father was a native of Maryland, and his mother (Elizabeth Tulley) was a descendant of the Floyd family, prominent among the pioneer settlers of Kentucky. Jacob Lurton was an active member of the Methodist church, and one of the pioneers of Methodism. He emigrated to Illinois with his family, and settled in Madison county, in the spring of 1817, and resided on his farm ten miles northwest of Alton until his death, which occurred in the fall of 1832. His wife died several years afterward. When Mr. Lurton first settled in Madison county he was on the frontier settlement in that direction. He was a presiding elder of the Methodist church eight years, and a clergyman over forty years, being actively engaged as one of the pioneer preachers in Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Illinois. Jacob Lurton was educated in the common schools of Jefferson county, Kentucky, and the High School of Louisville. He came to Illinois with his father, and soon after became acquainted with Miss Margaret McDow, the seventh child of John and Margaret McDow (see personal history of Thomas McDow elsewhere in this work), to whom he was married March 20, 1829. By this union they have a family of eight children, three sons and five daughters, of whom seven are now living, in the following order of birth, viz: Nelson, residing on section 32, township 7, range 11; John C., residing on section 33, same township; Julia Ann, present wife of John Allen, residing on section 3, township 6, range 11; Marjare, present wife of N. V. Hamilton, merchant at Delhi, Illinois; Sarah M., present wife of Rev. Robert Smith located at Berdan, Greene county, Illinois; Lieutenant Jacob P., deceased, who was actively engaged during the late rebellion in company H, ninety-seventh regiment Illinois volunteer infantry, and was a young man of promise, who sacrificed his life for the honor of our common country; Caroline, residing with her parents; and Olevia M., present wife of John M. Mott, residing on section 29, township 7, range 11. Mr. Lurton settled in the winter of 1830 on the northwest quarter of section 32, township 7, range 11, where he now resides. Although educated for the medical profession, he had followed farming through life. He began life with small capital, except brain and muscle, but with a good basis of moral principle and the assistance of his worthy wife, through the divine blessing, he has made life a success; not so much, however, in the multiplication of fertile acres as in usefulness, by making the community and world better, happier, and wiser for having lived in it: – better, by his industry and example; happier, by his cordial kindness and hospitality; and wiser, by his experience and counsel. He was called by his fellow citizens to the judicial bench of the county, which position he filled for eight years. Religiously, he has been, from early life, associated with the Methodist Episcopal church, and his wife with the Baptist church. Mr. L. and his wife have been remarkably blessed to live to see their family comfortably settled in life, and mostly in the community where they have devoted the major part of their life-work. He has no military record except the enlistment of a company for the Blackhawk war. Politically, Judge Lurton is a democrat. As a self-made man he is a brilliant star in the galaxy that surrounds Jersey county.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Thomas LYONS was born in Ireland, July 12, 1798. He is the oldest child of Robert and Fanny Lyons, who were also citizens and natives of Ireland, residing only about five miles southwest of the noted curiosity, the “Giant’s Causeway.” They had a family of seven children, two sons and five daughters, two of them deceased. He was principally engaged in mercantile pursuits through life. He died in 1852, and his wife about one year previous. They were strongly in favor of the restoration of the liberties of their native isle. Thomas Lyons followed a variety of occupation before he emigrated to the country. He was active, full of humor, and a young man of those social qualities well calculated to entertain and interest those with whom he associated. He was married July 11, 1828, to Miss Mary A., daughter (fourth child) of John and Jane Taggert. By this union they have had a family of three sons and two daughters, in the following order of birth, viz: John, residing in Macoupin county, Illinois; Robert, who fell a sacrifice to the needs of his country during the late rebellion, and who was a young man of great promise; James, now residing with his parents; Fanny, present wife of Jacob Husseman, residing in Montgomery county, Illinois; and Jane, present wife of Spencer McKenney, residing with his father-in-law.
     Mr. Lyons emigrated to this country in the fall of 1834. He settled the next year on the farm where he now resides – the southwest quarter of section 22, township 8, range 12. Mr. Lyons is one of the early settlers of Jersey county. He began with small financial means, but by his energy and industry has obtained a competence for himself and family. He has principally followed farming, but for several years, in company with his brother-in-law, Andrew Taggert, he has been engaged in merchandizing, in the first store in the township. Mr. Lyons is one of the substantial citizens of the community in which he has spent over thirty-seven years of his active and exemplary life, and his is highly esteemed as a citizen and business man.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


William McADAMS, Sen., was born in Middletown, Butler county, Ohio, April 25th, 1808, and is the son of Thomas and Elizabeth McAdams. Thomas McAdams was a native of Scotland, and when sixteen years of age he emigrated to this country, and settled in Philadelphia. He was married, in 1798, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of James and Rebecca Noble, who were natives of Pennsylvania. As a result of this union, they had a family of eight children – four sons and four daughters – of whom two sons and two daughters are deceased. Mr. McAdams was engaged in the war of 1812 as a volunteer, and was taken prisoner at Detroit. He followed farming through life, and died December, 1833. His wife died in the spring of 1836.
     William McAdams was educated in the common schools of his native county, and on the 6th of November, 1831, he was married to Miss Eliza, oldest child of Joseph and Nancy Faries, whose ancestral descent was Scotch and Irish, and who were among the early settlers of Butler county, Ohio. The result of this union has been a family of nine children – four sons and five daughters – seven of whom are still living, in the following order of birth, viz: William, jr., residing on section 12, township 7, range 12, at present the nominee of the democratic party for the state legislature; Mary Jane and Elenora, both residing with their parents; Lewis, engaged in milling at Newbern, Illinois; Rebecca, present wife of Wm. Blaler, residing at Newbern; and Anna, residing with her parents.
     Mr. McAdams began life as a carpenter, but soon changed to mercantile business, which he followed about twenty years, or until 1850(?), when he engaged in farming, which he has mostly followed until the present time. He emigrated to Illinois, and settled about one mile south-west of Jerseyville in the fall of 1857, where he remained until the spring of 1864, when he removed to his farm near Otterville. Here he resided until the spring of 1872, when he rented his farm and moved to the village of Otterville. His farm of six hundred and forty acres is one of the best in Jersey county. (A view of the farm residence is shown elsewhere in this work). [See
1872 Farms & Residences] Politically, he is, and always has been, a democrat. His present social and financial position is attributable to his inherent energy and good management. He is one of the self-made men of the county, and is too well known to require any eulogy at our hands. It is enough to say, he has the respect and confidence of a large circle of acquaintances, and it is no more than a just tribute to so upright and public-spirited a citizen.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Hon. William McADAMS, Jr., was born in Butler county, Ohio, December 28, 1839, and is the eldest of a family of seven children of William and Eliza A. McAdams. The subject of this sketch received his early education principally under the tuition of Prof. Nathaniel P. Firman, an eminent educator of Ohio, by which he attained a thorough knowledge of the English branches. Mr. McAdams is passionately fond of the study and practical investigation of the science of geology, and in the State Geological Reports of Illinois frequent mention is made of his name, connected with the many important discoveries that he has made in that profound science. He is frequently invited to lecture before literary and other societies on that subject. Previous to becoming a resident of Illinois, he was engaged in teaching for three or four winters in Ohio; but his principal occupation for a considerable time has been that of a farmer. In the spring of 1865 he was married to Miss Anna Curtis, of Jersey county. They have had a family of two children. In early life he became a member of the democratic party, to which he has since strictly adhered. He was elected a member of the Historical Society of Illinois several years ago; and his attainments in the scientific field have won him many golden opinions. He has always been a close student, which has enabled him to gather stores of valuable information, and few gentlemen of this portion of the state have a more thorough scientific culture than he. And now, when about in the prime of life, he brings to bear, upon any subject that may claim his attention, considerable force and power. In the fall of 1872 he was elected a member of the legislature of Illinois, as representative from Jersey county.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Isaac McCOLLISTER was born in Salem, Washington county, New York, April 24th, 1817. His parents, John and Mary McCollister, emigrated west in the summer of 1819, with a family of six sons and one daughter, and also accompanied by the present wife of David Hodge, formerly of Greene county, Illinois. Mr. McCollister, with others, bought a keel-boat at Pittsburg, on which they came by water to Milton, below Alton, where they arrived in August, 1819. Here, in the space of one month, Mrs. McCollister was afflicted by the loss of her husband and three of her sons. After this severe affliction, she rented a house in Upper Alton, where she remained about one year, and then, in the spring of 1821, she removed to Apple Creek Prairie, west of Whitehall, Greene county, Illinois. Here she reared the balance of her family, viz: William E., now deceased; Lemuel, who is residing south-east of Jerseyville; Mary, relict of the late Henry Floyd, of Greene county, and now residing about two miles west of Whitehall; and the subject of this sketch, who resides about one mile south-east of Fidelity, Illinois. Mrs. McCollister died in September, 1840.
     The subject of this sketch, after attaining manhood, spent about two years, from 1839 to 1841, at Glena. He was married, March 10th, 1846, to Miss Sylvia, daughter of Asahel North, one of the pioneers of Greene county. They have had a family of thirteen children, of whom only six are now living, viz: Augusta, Edward F., Eliza J., and Albert S., and one of the twins (Ira I. and Ida S.), born March 31st, 1867.
     Mr. McCollister entered land on the north-east quarter of section 15, township 9, range 10, and eighty acres of timber near, on which he settled in the spring of 1846. He improved and cultivated this land until the spring of 1857, when he removed to his present residence, on the northeast quarter of section 13, township 8, range 10. (A lithographic view of his residence appears elsewhere in this work.) [See
1872 Farms & Residences] Mr. McCollister is truly a pioneer citizen of the state of Illinois, having spent fifty-four years of his life within its boundary, and, as energetic and industrious citizen, has done his share in developing Greene and Jersey counties. His good qualitites as a man and a citizen have endeared him to a large circle of acquaintances.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Thomas McDOW is a native of South Carolina, born August 12, 1795. He is the second child of John and Margaret McDow, who had a family of ten children, five of whom are now living. They were natives of South Carolina, where they were married and resided till the autumn of 1807, when, with his family, Mr. McDow emigrated to Illinois, and settled in the present limits of Madison county. After residing there one year, he located on the Mississippi bottom, six miles above the village (now city) of St. Louis, where he resided till the spring of 1818, when he settled in Boone county, Missouri, where he resided till the fall of 1824. He then returned to Illinois and settled on section 32, township 7, range 11, where he resided till his death, which took place in October, 1835. His wife died in the fall of 1850. Mr. McDow and his wife were among the early pioneer settlers of the state, as well as of Jersey county. When he first settled in the territory of Illinois, it contained less than one-half the present population of Jersey county, and St. Louis numerically less than Jerseyville. Three of their children are still living, and are citizens of the county in which they were pioneers, and have lived nearly fifty years. Thomas McDow was married, February 25, 1819, to Miss Mary L. Lofton, formerly of Kentucky. They have had a family of eleven children, four sons and seven daughters, of whom ten are now living and comfortably settled in life. Mr. McDow settled on the farm where he now resides, on section 32, township 7, range 11, in the spring of 1823. He was elected an acting justice of the peace in August, 1831, being the first in the township. This position he has filled sixteen years. Mr. McDow has been an active, useful citizen in the community in which he has so long resided, and has won the respect of a large circle of friends and acquaintances.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


James McGUIRE was born in Rowan county, north carolina, November 4th, 1794. He is the sixth of a family of seven children of James and Ellanor McGuire, who were both natives of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and originally of Irish descent. Mrs. McGuire’s maiden name was Ellanor Luckey, and her parents emigrated from Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, to North Carolina, when she was but thirteen years of age; and it was in that state that they became acquainted and were married. His occupation was that of a farmer. They both died in North Carolina.
     In 1829, Mr. James McGuire left his native state for the west, and after a long tedious trip, landed in St. Charles county, Missouri, on New Year’s day of that year. His fist employment was working on a farm, which he followed about two years, and in 1832, he enlisted in Captain Nathan Boone’s company of rangers. The latter was a son of Col. Daniel Boone, the inveterate Indian fighter of Kentucky. Soon after enlisting, the company of rangers were attached to that part of the army stationed at Rock Island. After peace was declared Captain Boone’s company was sent to Fort Gibson, on the Arkansas river, being stationed there for the purpose of trying to civilize the Pawnee Indians. Mr. McGuire remained there till the expiration of his term of service, which took place August 1st, 1833; after which he returned to St. Charles county, Missouri, where he resided till the latter part of November, when he came over and settled in what is now Jersey county, and entered the land where he now resides at government prices. He came here very poor, and out of the then rough wilds, he carved out a comfortable home. He says that from early boyhood he has always been a supporter of the principles of the democratic party. He was a great admirer of Andrew Jackson and his policy. Mr. McGuire can remember when there was only one cabin between his place and Jerseyville. He is now residing at his residence enjoying good health.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


James McKINNEY was a native of Virginia, born May 24, 1806. He was the oldest son of Abraham and Mary McKinney, of Virginia, who emigrated to Illinois, and settled in Madison county in 1818, where he remained two years, after which, with his family of eight children, he located on the Illinois river bottom, in the present limits of Jersey county. In the spring of 1822, he removed to section 24, township 8, range 12, where he resided till his death, which occurred in April, 1840. His wife died in 1824. The subject of this sketch was married, June 8, 1826, to Miss Mary Ann, the second child of John and Heriba Crain, who were among the early settlers of St. Clair county, Illinois. Mr. Crain was a native of North Carolina. He settled in Harrison county, Tenn., where, in 1806, he was married to Miss Heriba Rumney. They settled in St. Clair county in 1811, where they resided till the spring of 1819, when he removed to the present limits of Jersey county, and settled on section 10, township 8, range 12, where he resided till October, 1845, when, with his wife, he emigrated to Texas, where he died in 1855, and his wife, August 5, 1867. Miss Mary Ann Crain was born in Robinson county, Tennessee, February 6, 1809, and removed to Illinois with her parents at the time above stated. The subject of this sketch followed farming through life. He had a family of thirteen children, seven sons and six daughters, nine of whom are still living: Andrew, residing in Missouri; Jacob, residing in Montgomery county, Illinois; Spencer, residing in township 8, range 12; James, residing in Jerseyville, Illinois; Rosalie, present wife of James Short, residing in township 8, range 11; Catherine, present wife of John A. Campbell, residing in township 8, range 12; Mary, present wife of Vincent Hughes, of Sangamon county, Illinois; Emma, present wife of Dallas Doublebower, of Lafayette, Indiana; and Elizabeth, present wife of George Rowdon, residing on the homestead with their mother. Mr. McKinney and wife were among the first settlers of Jersey county. He led an active, industrious life, and as a citizen was esteemed by all who knew him. He died September 17, 1867. His wife is still living on the old homestead where she first settled soon after her marriage.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Alexander A. McREYNOLDS was born in Sumner county, Tennessee, September 28, 1819. He is the oldest of a family of five children of Joseph and Margarette McReynolds, who were both natives of North Carolina, and removed, with their parents, to Tennessee when quite young. The ancestorial descent on the paternal side was Scotch-Irish. Joseph McReynolds, sr., grandfather of Alexander A., was a soldier in the war of the revolution. He was with that branch of the army under General Greene, and participated in many difficult campaigns and hard battles, prominent among which were the battles of Cowpens, Eutaw Springs, and Guilford Court House. He lived for many years after the war, and died at his residence in Indiana. Joseph McReynolds, jr., was married in the state of Tennessee, and a few years after removed to Posey county, Indiana, in the spring of 1832, and remained there until the spring of 1835, when he removed with his family, to the present limits of Jersey county, Ill., and entered the land on which his son, T. J. McReynolds, now resides. He died at his residence July 3, 1860; his widow is yet living.
     The subject of this sketch received his early education in the district schools of Tennessee, though he also attended school one year at Gallatin Academy, Sumner county, in the same state. He came to this state with his parents at the above stated time, and for several years assisted his father in carrying on the farm. On the 21st of April, 1846, he was married to Miss Helen Spencer, daughter of John L. and Elizabeth Spencer, of this county, though formerly from New Jersey. Mr. McReynolds and wife have had six children, three of whom are yet living. Mr. McR. commenced life poor, but through industry and economy has succeeded in gaining a comfortable amount of wealth. He is noted for strict integrity and honorable dealing. Mrs. McReynolds died at their residence on the 15th of March, 1861, and in November, 1865, Mr. McReynolds was married to Miss Alanora Van Horne, daughter of David and Anna Van Horne. By her he has had four children. Mr. McReynolds and wife are both members of the Second Presbyterian Church of Jerseyville. He has been a member of that church for about thirty years. In 1860 he was elected an elder in the church. Early in life he became a member of the democratic party; his first vote for president was for Franklin Pierce. Agricultural pursuits have claimed most of his attention during life. Mr. McReynolds is highly respected for his generosity and liberality, and by his genial and courteous manners has won the respect of many friends.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Henry C. MASSEY, Esq., was born in St. Charles county, Missouri, November 19, 1828. He is the eldest of four children of Woodberry andMaria Massey. Mr. M. was a native of Watertown, New York, and his wife was born in St. Charles county, Missouri. Mr. Massey belonged to that class of men who are fond of the adventures of a pioneer life, and of those who take hold with an energetic will the development of a new country; and actuated with those desires, he turned his attention westward, and after a journey of several weeks, landed in St. Charles county, Missouri, in the year 1820, and there became acquainted with Miss Maria Coonts, who afterwards became his wife, and the mother of his children. She was the daughter of Nicholas and Rebecca Coonts, and it is fitting that we here narrate the thrilling and perilous adventures that characterized the earlier years of the life of Nicholas Coonts. He was born in the western part of Pennsylvania. His father was a small farmer in those mountainous districts, and their cozy cabin, situated in the sylvan shades of thesurrounding forest, beside a clear, running stream, surrounded by tall mountains, overhanging crags, and dangerous precipices. In that sublime and romantic place Nicholas Coonts first saw the light of day. During the period of the revolutionary war, on a clear and beautiful day in autumn, a roving band of Indians pounced down from the neighboring cliffs upon the unwary inmates of that cabin, and with a blood-thirsty cruelty unequalled by any other race, massacred all the family except Nicholas, and only preserved his life in consequence of the heroic and intrepid bravery that he manifested in the defence of his parents. At the moment of the attack he seized a musket and shot down several Indians, reloading his piece and firing with the coolness and precision of an experienced hunter. And whilethe tomahawk of one Indian was raised above his head, the chief came to his rescue, and averted the blow that, in an instant more, would have taken his life. Even those rude and untutored savages were struck with the remarkable bravery of that noble boy; and that body of dusky warriors, members of the then powerful Camanche tribe, carried the captive boy with them to the distant plains of Nebraska. He lived with them for several years, learning all the secrets and arts of the crafty and experienced hunter. The Indians treated him kindly, and he grew up athletic and strong, and soon surpassed all in the chase. The Indians thought him reconciled to his fate, but such was not the case. Years had not defaced from his memory the fearful slaughter of his relatives. After the tribe had returned from a long chase, weary and exhausted with its fatigues, he took advantage of the opportunity to effect his escape. He first secured two of their fleetest horses and started for the distant settlements on the Mississippi river. He rode those horses for several days, until theywere completely jaded out, and the balance of the way to St. Charlescounty, Missouri, he made on foot, and the commandant at the fort had to ransom him several times in order to appease the Indians. He married in St. Charles county, and raised a large family of children, and became at that time one of its prominent citizens.

Mr. Woodberry Massey resided in St. Charles county a short time after his marriage, and, about 1830, crossed the river into Illinois, and settled on the present site of upper Grafton, where he entered some land. Not long after he moved to the forks of Otter creek, where, for a short time, he carried on merchandise; after which he removed with his family to Galena, and there engaged in mining and merchandise, residing there about one year, when he moved to Dubuque, where he was engaged in the same pursuit. After a while he withdrew from mercantile pursuits and devoted his whole attention to mining. Soon he commenced working an abandoned claim, which proved to he quite rich in lead ore, and in going on the grounds with his men on the afternoon of September 7th, 1835, and there meeting some of the former operators of the mine, and a dispute arising, without any notice he was shot and killed by two men, father and son, by the name of Smith, both of whom afterwards paid the penalty of their crime by their death. The elder Smith was shot by Henry L. Massey, a brother of the one that was killed. The circumstances were that Smith came riding through Galena, asserting that he would exterminate the Massey family; whereupon Mr. Massey rushed into the street and shot Smith dead while sitting on his horse. He then rushed through his shop and mounted a horse and crossed the river into Iowa. Miss Louisa Massey, sister of Woodberry Massey, entered a store in Dubuque with the avowed intention of purchasing goods, and the younger Smith being pointed out to her by a small boy, she quickly drew a pistol and shot him in the breast, giving him a mortal wound. The general verdict of the people was that the brother and sister of Mr. Massey did right in avenging his tragical death. After the event we have mentioned occurred, Mrs. Massey retured with her family to St. Charles, Missouri, and, in 1837, settled in the present limits of this county, and in the winter of that year was married to B. F. Massey, a brother of her former husband. She died at her residence. on the 4th of January, 1852. Mr. Henry C. Massey was raised and educated principally in the schools of Jersey county, and in early life was thrown on his own resources. On the 25th of November, 1854, he wasunited in marriage with Miss Catharine Fitzgerald, daughter of Thomas and Mary Fitzgerald. Mrs. Massey as born in Ireland, on the 25th day of June, 1836. Her father died in that country, and she emigrated with her mother to Illinois in 1851. Mr. Massey and wife have had nine children, eight of whom are yet living. He started in life poor, but being enterprising and industrious, he has met with fine success, and now, as the result of his indefatigable energy, owns a farm of nearly nine hundred acres, situated about two miles and a half south-west of Jerseyville. We mention this fact simply to illustrate what industry and economy may accomplish. He unquestionably stands in the front rank of the representative farmers of Jersey county. In 1866, he was a candidate for sheriff on the independent ticket, though defeated by a small majority. Early in life he became a member of the democratic party.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


George S. MILES, D.D.S., is a native of Westminster, Massachusetts. He was born October 13, 1832, He is the eldest of a family of three children of George and Lunida B. Miles. They were among the lineal descendents of the Pilgrim Fathers. His occupation was that of a farmer. His death occurred the 10th of June, 1872. Mrs. Miles is yet living. The Doctor received his literary culture at Westminster Academy, and was also a student at Hopkins Academy, at Hadley, Massachusetts. Being a young man of considerable force of character, and of studious habits, he succeeded in laying the foundation of a good education. At the age of twenty-one he commenced the study of dentistry with Dr. T. S. Blood, of Pittsburg, Massachusetts, and graduated in his profession about three years after. He practiced a short time at Salem, Massachusetts. In August, 1855, he came to Jersey county, Illinois, and immediately after, settled in Jerseyville in the practice of his profession. On the 2d of August, 1859, Dr. Miles was married to Miss Mattie De Wolf Warren, daughter of Hon. George E. and Hattie Warren. They have had five children, one of whom is deceased. Politically he is a supporter of the principles of the republican party, and is one of the recognized leaders of that party in the county of Jersey. In the campaign of 1872 he was the chairman of the Jersey county central committee. Dr. Miles, by his skill and scientific treatment, has taken his stand, by merit, among the leading dentists of Illinois, and is a member of the dental society of Illinois. The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery was conferred on him, in 1867, by the Missouri Dental College. Success has attended him in the practice of his profession. He is a memberof the Masonic and Odd Fellows societies, and by his affable manners has won many friends.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Martin B. MINER, Esq., was born in Addison county, Vermont, March 22, 1805. The record of the Miner family dates back to Edward III, during whose reign one Henry Bullman, a miner in the lead mines of Mendippi Hills, in the county of Somerset, England, had his name changed to that of Henry Miner, in accordance with his occupation, by order of King Edward the Third, for his loyalty in furnishing the king with an escort of one hundred men from his mines, all armed with double battle axes, when he was passing through Somerset on his way to war with France, A. D. 1346. The first ancestors of the family came from England to America in 1630, landing at Salem, Massachusetts. William, the father of Martin B., was the son of Lieutenant Clement Miner, of Stonington, Connecticut, and officer of the revolution. He married Prudence Potter, of Newport, Rhode Island, at whose father’s house General De Rochambeau and suite quartered in the winter of 1780, previous to his leading the French army to the aid of the Americans. William Miner died in 1813, leaving all of his children orphans under fifteen years of age, of whom Martin B. was the fifth, and who was educated in the academies of Vermont, by his own exertions, and read law with Hon. Heman Allen, M. C., from Burlington, Vermont. He was admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of that State in 1834, and was married in January 1836, to Laura Lyman McNeil, fourth daughter of Charles McNeil, Esq., of Charlotte, Vermont. He moved, in the fall of 1836, to Illinois, settling at Woodburn in January, 1837. In the fall of that year he moved to Alton, and in the spring of 1840 to Jerseyville, where for most of the time since, he has followed the practice of law. His only child now living is Mrs. Nellie C. M. Keene, who married Rev. A. C. Keene, February 25, 1864.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Nathaniel MINER was born a few miles from Old Crown Point, New York, January 1, 1801. He is the fourth child of William and Prudence Miner. The subject of this sketch attended the schools of Bridgeport, Vermont. In October, 1832, he landed in the present limits of Jersey county, and soon after entered the land on which he now resides, west of Jerseyville. Mr. Miner assisted in raising the first frame building in Jerseyville, then situated on the present site of the banking house of Cross and Swallow. On the 3d of August, 1833, he was married to Miss Louisa Jackson, daughter of Aaron Jackson. Mr. J. and family were formerly from Addison county, Vermont. They have had seven children, five of whom are yet living. For the last eighteen years he has held the office of constable. Thirty years ago, Mr. Miner and wife became members of the Baptist church. Mr. Miner was the first constable elected after the organization of Jersey county. On the 22d of August, 1869, Mrs. Miner died at their residence. The subject of this sketch is noted for his inflexible honesty and integrity.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


William K. MINER was born February 7, 1803, in the state of Vermont. He was the son of William B. and Rebecca Miner, who were citizens of the same state. William K. received his early education in his native state, when, at the age of twenty, he was married to Miss Hannah Drury of Vermont. By this marriage he had six children, four of whom are still living, viz: Rebecca, former wife of Wm. H. Frost, now residing at Jerseyville; Betsy, present wife of G. R. Garretson, of Fidelity, Ill.; Henry C., at present a citizen of Clay county, Ill.; and Hannah, residing at Jerseyville with her sister, Mrs. Frost. Mr. Miner came to the present limits of Jersey county, and purchased land about one mile west of the present village of Fidelity, where the balance of his life was spent, except about a year and a half, which he passed in his native state. After the death of his first wife he was again married, December 2, 1836, to Miss Mary A., daughter of Thomas Solly, of Philadelphia. By this marriage he had a family of four children, viz: James Edward, deceased; Charles Frederic, now a citizen of Christian county, Ill.; Mary Louisa, residing with her mother; and Maggie, present wife of E. A. Dodge, residing on her father’s old homestead. Mr. Miner was among the early settlers of the township. He followed farming as the leading business of his life. He was one of the intelligent citizens of the county and a public-spirited and moral man. As a member of the Baptist Church, he lived a consistent Christian; as a citizen, he favored the advancement of educational interests. His co-operation with other citizens of Fidelity in the erection of the beautiful, graded school edifice, is a fair index to the true character of Mr. Miner as a public-spirited citizen. He died at his residence (where his wife is now residing) in the village of Fidelity, March 2, 1870. While his family mourn the loss of a devoted and affectionate husband and parent, the community in which he resided feel the loss of a good citizen, whose memory they will long cherish.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


James MOORE was born in Knox county, Tennessee, December 11, 1827. He is the youngest child of William and Patsey Moore, who had a family of nine children. William Moore and his family emigrated to Illinois in the fall of 1829, and settled about six miles south of the present site of Jerseyville, where he remained about two years. In the fall of 1831, he made a permanent settlement in township 8, range 11, on section 20, where he lived till the winter of 1835-6, when he was frozen to death on his return from mill. He was on foot, having sent his team by his son Carter. William and Patsey Moore came to the present limits of Jersey county with eight children, in the following order of birth, viz: John, who was one of the pioneer settlers in township 8, range 10, now deceased; Nancy, deceased, former wife of John Fawbush, also deceased; Betsey, present wife of John Blaney, of Fidelity, residing on section 16; Sanford, deceased, who was a distinguished hunter among the pioneers; Carter, deceased; Polly, present wife of Gamaliel Parker, of Greene county, Illinois; Martha, present wife of Mr. Heifer, of Greene county, Illinois; and James, subject of this sketch, who is residing on the same farm where he has lived upwards of twenty years, having been a citizen of the county over forty-three years. He was married, March 30, 1854, to Miss Jane Davis, of Jersey county. The have had a family of nine children, three of whom died in infancy. Those living are, in order of birth, as follows, viz: John Henry, Adelia, Samuel Douglas, Benjamin Franklin, Eva Caroline and Robert Lee, all of whom are residing with their parents. Mr. Moore has, since he attained manhood, devoted his time to farming, except two years, 1852-53, which he spent in California. By his industry he has acquired a comfortable home for himself and family, and, although in common with many of the early settlers, had not the educational advantages of the present day, yet he is an esteemed citizen and competent and upright business man, and is duly appreciated by a large circle of friends and acquaintances.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page

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