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1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page

Biographies in the
Atlas Map of Jersey County, Illinoisby Andreas, Lyter & Co., Davenport, IA, 1872

N. L. ADAMS was born in Halifax, Windham county, Vermont, February 3, 1796. He is the son of Levi and Dolly Adams, who were natives of Massachusetts. His father, Levi, and his grandfather were both soldiers in the American revolution. N. L. worked with his father on the farm in his younger days, attaining in the mean time his early education in his native state. He was married and settled in the present limits of Jersey county, in January, 1833, on his farm in the south part of the city of Jerseyville, where he now resides. At that time there was only one other family, Alfred Carpenter’s, residing in the present city limits. Mr. Adams began the life struggle with small capital, but by energy and perseverance he carved out a home for himself and family, and has acquired a competence. He has followed a variety of occupations, but made farming his principal business. He built the first steam mill in Jersey county in Jersey county, in 1849. It had two run of burrs, and, at the time of its completion, was considered the best mill in this part of the state. He is now the proprietor of the National Mill, at Jerseyville, Illinois. Mr. Adams entered the land on which he now resides, besides his twO additions which he has made to the city of Jerseyville. He is one of the energetic, public-spirited men of the county, and has won the respect of a large circle of friends and acquaintances in the locality where he has devoted nearly forty years of an active life. One of the pioneer settlers, he is permitted to live and witness the growth and prosperity of the city of Jerseyville. Mr. Adams has been twice married, and has had a family of ten children, five of whom are now living, and three citizens of Jersey county. They are all married and well settled in life. Mr. Adams was for many years a member of the Baptist church. Politically, he was first a democrat; he then became a whig, and on the disorganization of that party he became a republican. He has always been a zealous advocate of equal rights, and his record for universal freedom he prizes the most highly of any feature of his political life.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Zenas H. ADAMS is a native of Oneida county, New York, born April 12, 1798. He is the third of a family of four children of Moses and Phoebe H. Adams, who were both natives of Berkshire county, Massachusetts. Mr. Adams was for a short time in the army during the war of 1812. Soon after his marriage he moved to Oneida county, New York, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits. They both spent the residue of their lives in the county, on their farm. Mr. Z. H. Adams was educated in the schools of central New York, and in 1812 he went to Watertown, New York, where he was employed as clerk in his uncle’s drug store. From that place he could hear the booming of the cannon, while the fight between the British and American soldiery was progressing at Sackett’s Harbor. He remained with his uncle two years, then became a clerk in a dry goods house of that place. In 1828 he engaged in business for himself, which he carried on until he removed to the west, which was in June, 1832, when he landed in Illinois. He first located in Jacksonville, as a clerk in a store for a few months. In September, 1832, he settled at Kane, Greene county, where he became a partner in a store with Daniel E. Brainard. He was merchandizing at that place with the financial crash of 1837 came on. He was among the few merchants of the west who did not fail. His was the first store between Carrollton and Alton. In 1839 he made a trip to New York, to visit his parents; returned after a short stay, and the same year purchased a farm in Kane. He was married, November 17, 1842, to Miss Amelia Knapp, daughter of Cornelius and Amelia Knapp. Mrs. Adams was born in Delaware county, New York, September 25, 1809. She came to this state with her mother and brothers in the spring of 1839, her father having previously died in New York. In 1856 Mr. Adams purchased a property in Jerseyville, where they have since resided. Mr. Adams, like most of the old settlers, came to this state with but a small capital, but by strict integrity and industry he succeeded in making a competence. Mrs. Adams is a member of the first Presbyterian church. Politically, during life Mr. Adams has been a democrat and feels proud of having followed so long in the illustrious footsteps of “Old Hickory.” His first vote for president was cast for James Monroe, and he has voted at every subsequent presidential election. He voted for Jackson every time he was a candidate. Mr. Adams has the esteem of a large circle of friends.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Hon. William H. ALLEN was born in Bristol county, Mass., October 12, 1814. He was the third child of William H. and Ruth Allen, who had a family of six children. They are lineally descended from the old Puritan stock, who settled at Plymouth. Mr. Allen’s vocation was that of a merchant, to which business he devoted the greater portion of his life. As a business man, he was active, energetic and successful. Mrs. Allen died in 1838, at their residence in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Mr. Allen is yet living at the advanced age of eighty-seven years, enjoys excellent health.

Mr. W. H. Allen received his preparatory education at New Bedford under private instruction. At the age of seventeen he entered the Freshman Class of Harvard University, and, after a course of four years, graduated in the class of 1835. After leaving college, he commenced merchandising at Philadelphia, and afterwards, at Pittsburgh, but that enterprise not proving very successful, he quit the business, sold his property, and came West, landing in St. Louis, in October, 1839. He returned soon after and spent the winter “East”, came West the following spring, and soon after located at Grafton, where he has since resided. There he commenced merchandising, and subsequently built a flouring mill; was also quite largely engaged in the real estate business.

On the twenty-third of April, 1840, he was married to Miss Martha M. Mason, daughter of James Mason, who was a prominent man of his day, and among the oldest settlers of that portion of the State. Mr. Mason laid out the town of Grafton. He was also a large real estate operator, at the time residing in Edwardsville. He was a man of superior business qualifications and left his impress on the community where he resided. He was a native of New Hampshire. For a short period he was engaged in mercantile pursuits in New York City. He was appointed receiver at the land office at Edwardsville, under the administration of John Quincy Adams. When Andrew Jackson became President, he was superseded by Gov. Edwards, after which Mr. Mason devoted his whole attention to speculating in real estate, in which business he was eminently successful, his investments being made with great discretion, having owned property in such cities as St. Louis, Quincy, and Bloomington. He was a gentleman who was highly respected in consequence of his purity of character and straightforward dealings.

Mr. and Mrs. Allen have had born to them eight children, three sons and three daughters yet living. Their eldest daughter, Rosalie, is the wife of Dr. Herriott, of Grafton’ and Irene the wife of E. A. Pinero, Esq., who is the bank partner of Mr. Allen. James M. Allen is proprietor of the flouring mill. The balance of the family reside at home with their parents.

In October, 1869, Mr. Allen engaged in banking, under the style of Allen & Pinero.

In early life, Mr. Allen was a Whig, and voted first for Gen. Taylor. When that party became extinct, he joined the Democrats, voting first in the interest of that party for James Buchanan. In the winter of 1861-2, he was a delegate to the constitutional convention to revise the constitution of Illinois; and in the fall of 1871 was elected Senator from the sixth district, embracing at that time Pike, Calhoun, Greene, and Jersey counties. He was also elected associate county judge, from 1865 to 1869. He is a gentleman of fine business abilities, and a man of fine scholarly attainments, and by his quiet, straightforward life has endeared himself to the people of Jersey County. He never was a political aspirant and has accepted the above positions simply to accede to the urgent requests of his fellow citizens. He is now residing at Grafton, which for many years has been the theater of his earnest endeavors

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Edgar AMES, the subject of this memoir, undoubtedly takes front rank among the leading business men of our great commercial centers; and when the history of St. Louis shall be written, and due mention made of those who have been foremost in raising her to her proud eminence among the commercial marts of the world, his name and achievements will not be over looked.

Edgar Ames was born in Oneida county, New York, October 26, 1826. He was the youngest of a family of three children of Nathan and Rectina Ames, whose ancestors were English and who were lineally connected with the Ames of Massachusetts. About the year 1830, Mr. Ames removed from New York to Cincinnati, which continued to be his residence for about ten years. He was there largely engaged in pork-packing, his business house being among the leading establishments of that kind in the city. In 1840 he removed to St. Louis and resumed the same business. In 1853 his wife died. He survived her death till 1856. Edgar Ames received his education in the schools of Ohio, and continued his studies at college several years after the family had removed to St. Louis. A few years previous to the death of his father, he became a member of the firm of Henry Ames & Co. No firm of business men in St. Louis was better known or more highly respected for their business ability and integrity than that of Henry Ames & Co. The excellent sugar-cured hams of that house have a world-renowned reputation.

On the fifth of June, 1860 Mr. Ames was married to Miss Lucy V. Semple, second daughter of Gen. James Semple, a well-known citizen of Illinois. They had two sons and two daughters.

Edgar Ames was twice elected Vice-President of the Chamber of Commerce of St. Louis. In politics he was ever an advocate of the principles of the democratic party. He died at his residence on the ninth of December, 1867, but the many noble virtues of his character yet live, and are the richest legacy left to his wife and children.

While we would speak in the highest terms of those benevolent and large-hearted acts which characterized his life, we would not fail to notice those eminent business qualifications which enabled him, in the commercial path, to outstrip so many of his contemporaries. His success was not the sudden inflation of the purse by rapid speculation, but the result of well-laid business plans, the carrying out of which stamped him among the great business men of the West. He became opulent and respected in all circles where he was known.

Such is a brief sketch of the life of one of St. Louis’ most illustrious business men. Mr. Ames was a man of broad, liberal culture, and possessed a mind well adapted for profound research. His integrity and purity of character won for him the approbation of the best men of the city where for many years he acted so conspicuous a part.

Mrs. Ames, since the death of her husband, has built a beautiful residence on the bluff overlooking the Mississippi, at Elsah – ”Notch Cliff” – the building of which was simply the carrying out of the previous designs of her husband, in compliance with the expressed desire of Gen. Semple. At this beautiful suburban retreat, Mrs. Ames spends a portion of the summer months. It commands an extensive of the Mississippi River, and the broad expanse of the alluvial soil on the Missouri side, while far in the distance the spires and buildings of St. Charles are distinctly visible. Her winter months are passed in her elegant residence in Lucas Place, St. Louis. She will continue to carry on the complicated and extensive business left by the death of her husband, with rare ability, foresight and judgment. Her natural qualifications eminently fit her to vie with the most distinguished business men of the age.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


John ANDREWS was born in Sussex county, Virginia, January 30, 1811. He was the ninth child of Joseph and Susan Andrews, who were natives of the “Old Dominion.” His father’s name was Richard, and the ancestorial descent was English. Joseph Andrews was married to Miss Susan Ellis, in January, 1801. They had thirteen children, nine sons and four daughters, five of whom are still living. They are, in the following order of birth, viz.” Robert, residing on section 12, township 7, range 10; Joseph, residing on the northeast quarter of section 1, same township; the subject of this sketch, residing on section 6, township 7, range 9; Benjamin, residing near Pana, Illinois; and James Wesley, residing in Neosho county, Kansas. Mr. Andrews and his family emigrated to Todd county, Kentucky, in the summer of 1817, where they resided till the fall of 1830, when they came to Illinois, and settled on the line of Greene (now Jersey) and Macoupin counties. His house was partly in each of those counties. Here he spent the balance of his life, and died in February, 1844, aged sixty-four years. His wife also died July 11, 1851, aged sixty-nine years. They were both active members of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which most of their children are also united. They lived circumspectly, walked uprightly, and died in the full triumphs of a living faith.
     The subject of this sketch was married, July 18th, 1837, to Miss Martha, third child of Rev. Alexander and Mary Miles, who were natives of North Carolina and Georgia, and among the early setters of Macoupin county. They have had a family of five children. William P. died October 18th, 1856, aged eighteen years; Herbert M. died December 13th, 1865; in his twenty-third year; Eliza Jane is the present wife of Thomas Simmons, residing near Brighton, Illinois; John Edward, residing with his parents. He was born March 26th, 1853; and Martha Ann died in infancy, October 10th, 1851. Mr. Andrews and wife became members of the Methodist Episcopal church before their marriage, and their family are also members of the same church. They are active and zealous members. Mr. A., as a farmer, is thorough and methodical, as a citizen, active and public-spirited. He is highly esteemed in the community in which nearly forty years of his active business life has been spent.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Marcus E. BAGLEY was born August 18, 1828, in Greene county, New York. He is the eldest child of a family of six children of Thomas and Mary Bagley. Mr. Bagley (the elder) was a native of Connecticut; his wife of New York. They are of Scotch-Irish and German extraction. His occupation is that of a farmer, and they are yet residents of Greene county, both upwards of ninety years of age. The subject of this sketch received his education in the common schools of his native county, attaining a good knowledge of the rudiments of an English education. In the autumn of 1850 he came to Illinois, locating in Jerseyville, where he soon after engaged in merchandising in company with A. W. Howe. He continued engaged in that business several years. On the 16th of February, 1860, he was married toMrs. Hattie M. Harriman, daughter of Mr. Page, of Barre, Massachusetts. Mr. Bagley and wife have had three children, two of whom are deceased. In the fall of 1860 he was elected to the office of circuit clerk of Jersey county, and by re-election has held that position ever since. No former clerk has been honored with the office so long; which, in part, will attest the appreciation in which Mr. Bagley is held by the people of Jersey county. He was nominated for the same office this fall. Mr. Bagley was the first mayor of Jerseyville. He has been a master in chancery since 1865. Since the disorganization of the whig party he has been a democrat. By his genial and courteous manner he has won the respect of a largecircle of friends. He is emphatically a self-made man.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Silas BATES was born in Butler county, Ohio, August 13, 1817. He is the oldest of a family of five children of William and Elizabeth Bates. William Bates was a native of Ohio, and was born in a fort built for protection against the Indians. His wife was a native of New Jersey. They were both of English descent. They removed to Jersey county in the fall of 1843, and settled about three miles south of Jerseyville, on a farm purchased by their son Silas, where they resided till their death. Mr. Bates died at the residence of his son Silas, December 27, 1869, and his wife about one year after.
     The subject of this sketch was educated in the common schools of his native state. His parents moved to Indiana in 1836, where he became acquainted with, and married, Miss Celina Hamilton, daughter of Stephen and Nancy Hamilton. She was a native of Virginia, and of English descent. They have had by this union thirteen children, eleben of whom are still living, four of whom are married and comfortable situated in life. When Mr. Bates settled in Jersey county in 1843, with his (ten) family of two children, he had a small outfit, and only two dollars and a half in cash. He was not, however, easily discouraged, but set himself earnestly to work to carve out a home for himself and family. He possessed that energy and perseverance so essential to success, and which enabled him to acquire a competence. Few citizens have, under more adverse circumstances, been more successful than Mr. Bates. By honesty, industry, and good management, he has acquired a farm of eleven hundred acres, in one body, which is one of the largest and most valuable in the county. The policy and principles by which he has attained such marked success in life may safely be copied and admired by all. Mr. Bates and his wife are both members of the Baptist church. He is esteemed for his upright dealing and active Christian benevolence. Politically, early in life he became a member of the whig party, and a great admirer of its illustrious champion, Henry Clay. He cast his first vote for General Harrison for president. He was a warm supporter of the Union cause during the late rebellion. He was always outspoken and radical in his sentiments, and benevolent in his acts to the Union cause. As a well known and prominent self-made man, Mr. Bates needs no eulogy at our hands. His virtuous, active, and well spent life speak more potently to all who have the pleasure of his acquaintance.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Hon. David E. BEATY, the eldest child of Nenian and Jane Beaty, was born in Butler county, Ohio, February 4th, 1812. Mr. Beaty’s occupation was that of a farmer; his death occurred in 1838. Mrs. Beaty survived the death of her husband until 1857. The subject of this sketch had no other early educational advantages than common schools of Ohio, but by assiduously employing his time, succeeded in acquiring a good common school education. Until nearly the age of eighteen, his time was mainly spent in his studies; after which he assisted his father is carrying on the farm. On the fifth of February, 1833, he was married to Miss Ann Elizabeth Ross, daughter of Amos and Lydia Ross, of Butler county, Ohio. By that union they have had born to them six children, five of whom are yet living; all grew up and married. A short time after his marriage, Mr. Beaty moved to Indiana and purchased a farm in Fayette county. Two of his children were born in that state. In 1839, after disposing of his property in Indiana, he returned to Butler county, Ohio, where after purchasing a farm, he resumed his former business. In 1859, he sold his property in Ohio, and, in January of that year, removed with his family to Jersey county, Illinois, and settled on the well known “Mound farm,” three miles south of Jerseyville. Agricultural pursuits have claimed most of his attention during life, in the management of which he has been eminently successful. He is now properly ranked among the model farmers of Jersey county. Mr. Beaty commenced life with but small capital, and almost unaided and alone, under these circumstances has succeeded in accumulating considerable property, and is now frequently spoken of as among the sound financial citizens of the county. It has been his endeavor to give his children the advantages of a liberal education. A sad event occurred to mar what had otherwise been a happy and pleasant life, and to cast a gloomover his home, the death of an estimab1e wife and mother, which occurred at their residence in January, 1868. This was a serious blow to Mr. Beaty; but time, the great healer of wounds, poured the necessary balm on his heart. Mr. Beaty and wife early become church members, uniting themselves with time first Presbyterian church of Jerseyville. Since joining the church Mr. Beaty has been elected to the responsible position of a ruling eider. He was married to his present wife, Miss Harriett M. Henderson, who was a native of New Hampshire. Quite early in life Mr. B. commenced the study of politics, and being from principle a free-soil man naturally fellinto the ranks of the whig party, and was a great admirer of its peerless statesman, Henry Clay. His first vote for president was cast for General Harrison; and after the disorganization of that party he became a member of the republican party. He voted twice for Abraham Lincoln, and both times for that distinguished general, U. S. Grant. During the late rebellion, when this portion of the state was infested with bushwackers, and turbulent partizan feeling ran high, David Beaty was found among the staunchest supporters of the cause of time union in Jersey county. His name is associated with many deeds of kindness for the amelioration of the sick and wounded soldiers. His eldest son, Nenian Beaty, enlisted in the one hundred and twenty-fourth regiment Illinois volunteers, and served through many hard campaigns of the war; and his son-in-law, David C. Beckett, was killed while bravely fighting the enemy at Kenesaw mountain; and his second son was sent as a substitute. Thus it will he seen that time family of Mr. Beaty did good service it, assisting to maintain theold flag. Mr. Beaty, like many of the energetic and enterprising oldsettlers, was not willing that his county should be surpassed by theadjoining counties in their agricultural exhibitions, and he set on foot a project to organize a county fair, which has been eminently successful. Mr. B. was elected its first president. In the fall of 1872, he was nominated for state senator as the candidate of the republican party. As a politician, he is among the leaders of the republican party in Jersey county, and is an able and forcible speaker. He has many of the elements which constitute the natural orator, and his style of delivery and address before an audience is such as indicates the self-made man. The career of Mr. Beaty, as a business man, has many things in it to challenge our admiration. What he undertakes he executes with energy and determination; and, at the same time he is guided by prudence and influenced by motives which reflect credit upon his acts. His heart is ever moved by warm andgenerous impulses, and by such conduct he has won the respect of hisfellow citizens.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Jeremiah BEATY was born in Butler county, Ohio, December 21, 1826. He is the youngest child of Nenian and Jane Beaty, who had a family of seven children, five sons and two daughters, five of whom are still living. Nenian Beaty was a native of Pennsylvania, and his wife (Jane McKenzie) was a native of North Carolina. Mr. Beaty settled in Butler county, Ohio, at a very early day, where he was married in 1798. His father, David Beaty, was a captain in the revolutionary war, and was one of the pioneer settlers in Butler county, Ohio. N. Beaty was one of the prominent and first-class farmers of Butler county, where he and his wife long lived, and where they both died.
     The subject of this sketch received his education in his native state. He attended two terms of what is now called The Farmers’ College, situated in the suburbs of Cincinnati. After he left school he resumed farming, which has been his special business thus far through life. He was married when about twenty-one years of age to Miss Nancy Lewis, daughter of Andrew and Mary Lewis, pioneer settlers of Ohio. He soon after purchased a farm in Butler county, Ohio, where he resided till the spring of 1858, when he settled in Jersey county, on the farm where he now resides, and which he purchased in the fall of 1857. Mr. B. has a family of eight children, all living. His eldest son is married and settled. Mr. and Mrs. Beaty are both members of the First Presbyterian church of Jerseyville. Mr. B. by native energy, industry, and methodical action, has been successful, and is one of the representative farmers of Jersey county. As the fruits of an upright, industrious life, devoted entirely to agriculture, he has a good farm, well improved, with comfortable and commodious buildings, and the appearance of the improved stock on his premises is an index of his motto – Excelsior – which he has always taken in his career as an agriculturist. Politically, Mr. B. was first a Clay whig, and became identified with the republican party at its organization. When we take into consideration the fact that Mr. Beaty began life with small capital, and see what he has achieved by honest industry and strict probity in all his dealings, we cannot but desire to emulate his success and admire the principles by which he has been governed. The facts of his life, indeed, forcibly show that men really are, to a great extent, the artificers of their own fortunes in the word.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


John S. BEATY was born in Butler county, Ohio, May 9th, 1816, and is the third child of Nenian and Jane Beaty. His father was a native of Pennsylvania, and his mother, whose maiden name was Jane McKenzie, was a native of North Carolina. His grandfather, Devid Beaty, commanded a company in the revolutionary war. Nenian Beaty was one of the early settlers of Butler county, Ohio, where he was married. He had a family of seven children – five sons and two daughters – five of whom are yet living. Three of the sons and one daughter are mong the prominent citizens of Jersey county.
     John S. Beaty was educated in Butler county, Ohio, where he was married, in October, 1838(?), to Miss Mary E. Ross, daughter of Maxwell and Maria Ross, of his native county. They have had a family of eight children, three of whom are deceased. One son and one daughter are married and well settled, and now residing in this county. Mr. Beaty settled in Jersey county in March, 1850, on the place where he now resides, and has one of the best cultivated farms in the community. He began with small means, but, by persevering industry, coupled with good management, has made life a success. Mr. Beaty’s motto in live has been, “Whatever is worth doing, is worth doing well,” and by carrying this out to the letter, he has become one of the model agriculturists of the county. As a citizen, he is highly respected by all who have the pleasure of his acquaintance.
     Mr. Beaty has given his family the advantage of a sound, practical education. Mrs. B. and most of the family are members of the Presbyterian church in Jerseyville. Politically, Mr. B. was an old-line whig, but since the disorganization of that party he has been identified with the republicans. He is one of the citizens of the county who, by the integrity of his character, has won the respect of a large circle of friends in the community in which he has long been an active and useful citizen.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Jeremiah BELL was born in Hancock county, Georgia, May 16, 1808. He is the fourth child of Jesse and Frances Bell. Jesse Bell was a native of North Carolina. He, with his father, Nathaniel Bell, who was a veteran of the revolutionary war, emigrated, soon after the war, and settled in Hancock county, Georgia, where Jeremiah Bell remained till 1818, when he followed his son Jesse, who, with his family of four children had settled, in 1811, near the present site of Edwardsville, Illinois. Jesse Bell took an active part in the last war with Great Britain. He was also one of the frontier guards, known as “Rangers.” He had a family of sixteen children by his two marriages – eight by each wife. His second wife, Susan Meachaun(?), was a native of Vermont. The subject of this sketch is the only child by the first wife now living; and four by the second wife are also living. Mr. Bell resided on the same farm where he first settled till his death, which occurred April 1, 1836, aged fifty-seven years. His birth was November 16, 1779. His first marriage, November 16, 1800, the day he was twenty-one years old. Jeremiah Bell, the subject of this sketch, received his early education in the common schools of Madison county, where he resided till his marriage to Miss Mary Million, which took place December 9, 1830. She was the daughter of Daniel and Barbara Million, who were natives of Virginia. They early settled in Kentucky, and in 1811 located in St. Clair county, near Bellville, Illinois, where they educated their family of nine children, seven of whom are still living. Mr. Bell first settled where he now resides in March, 1832. He has had a family of eleven children, five sons and six daughters, seven of whom are still living. They are in the following order of birth, viz: Robert M., residing in Brighton, Illinois; Jesse W., residing at Wichita, Sedgwick county, Kansas; Susan Frances, present wife of Stephen F. Corrington, of Carrollton, Illinois; Emma Ellen, residing with her parents; Mattie L., present wife of Hardin G. Keplinger, of Franklin, Morgan county, Illinois; William J., and Mary Adeline, residing with their parents. Mr. Bell is among the prominent farmers and stock-growers of Jersey county. He has taken an active jpart in introducing improved blooded cattle, hogs and horses; but in sheep he has introduced the fine Samanish Merino perhaps more extensively than any of his compeers. A view of his farm residence appears in this work. [See 1872 Farms & Residences] Mr. Bell had devoted nearly sixty-two years of his active life to the physical and moral development of the community in which he lived. Few men are now living having a larger experience of pioneer life. He has lived to see Jersey county contain a larger population that the entire state did when he first became a citizen of its territory. Mr. Bell and family are active members of the Methodist Episcopal church, as were his parents. Soon after his father, in company with others, had crossed the Ohio river, in the fall of 1811, he met a man on horseback, who asked Mr. Bell where he was going. “To Goshen settlement, Illinois,” was the reply. “You had better turn back, for there are nearly four hundred fresh graves that have never been wet by rain, and nobody living but a few shouting Methodists.” “Drive on,” said Mrs. Bell, “let me there die with them.” She died in August, 1818.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


James H. BELT, ex-sheriff of Jersey county, was born February 22, 1837. He is the sixth of a family of eleven children of Horatio N. and Mary Jane Belt. Mr. Belt was born on the western shore of Maryland November 1, 1796, and was one of five children of Lloyd and Elizabeth Belt. Mr. Belt and wife moved to St. Clair county, Ill., in 1820, where they spent the residue of their lives. Horatio N. was a soldier in the army in the war of 1812, and was with Jackson at New Orleans. After peace was declared, he settled in East Tennessee. In 1815 he was married to Miss Spicie Drake, by whom he had two children. In the fall of 1819 he moved to St. Clair county, Ill., and settled near Bellville. Mrs. Belt died on the 22d of April, 1820; and on the 5th of June, 1821, Mr. Belt married Miss Mary J. West, daughter of John and Mary West, formerly from Virginia. Mrs. Belt was born in Virginia March 6, 1805. In the fall of 1832 Mr. B. and family moved to the present limits of Jersey county, and settled on a tract of land in township 7, range 12, and being a man of industry and energy, was successful in the management of his business. In 1820 he became a member of the M. E. Church, and a few years after Mrs. B. became a member of the same church; and it is said that he built the first storehouse in Jerseyville, for Lott & Daily. He was for many years a justice of the peace. His eldest son, by his first wife, Francis T. Belt, was one of the first men who took a steamboat up the Illinois river, and was quite a prominent steamboat man; at the explosion of the steamer Silluda, and Lexington, Mo., April 8, 1852, he lost his life. Another son, Capt. Lloyd Belt, is now operating in the waters of the Lower Mississippi. Mr. Horatio N. Belt died at Fieldon, Jersey county, January 8, 1870. Mrs. Belt is yet living.
     The subject of this sketch received his early education in the common schools of Jersey county, and when about sixteen years of age became a member of the firm of Belt Bros. & Co., and is now senior partner in the firm. When about twenty-five years of age he was married to Miss Helen M. Bramlett, daughter of Alkana Bramlett, and old resident of this county. They have had three children. In the fall of 1868 he was elected sheriff of Jersey county. He is among the more active politicians of the county, and, as a business man, is a success, his career fully testifying to that fact.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Col. John R. BLACK is a native of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where he was born April 13th, 1797. He is the second of a family of four children of James and Mary A. Black. They were of Irish descent. The subject of this sketch attended the schools of east Tennessee during his youth, his parents having moved to that state when he was but six years old, and settled in Knox county, where his father engaged in farming. In 1815, he left Tennessee and came to the territory of Illinois, and located a farm in the celebrated “American Bottom,” Madison county. He remained there five years, then settled in Green (now Jersey) county, in township 7, range 11. On April 23rd, 1833, he was married to Miss Malinda Darnielle, the daughter of Archibald Darnielle, an old pioneer of the state. They had four children, three of whom are still living, and are all married. WhenCol. Black came to this state the country abounded with Indians, deer and wild beasts, and most subsistance of the settlers consisted of corn bread, wild meat and wild honey. The Colonel had but little means to start with, but by perseverance and energy acquired considerable property. He owned a farm of six hundred acres, which he has since deeded to his wife. On the breaking out of the war of 1812, Col. Black was among the first to volunteer from east Tennessee, and served under General Winchester at Mobile. At the expiration of his term of service he received an honorable discharge and returned home; and on the breaking out of the Blackhawk war, he enlisted and served until a treaty was made with the Indians at Rock Island. He has held the office of first lieutenant, captain, major and colonel of the militia of this county, and was elected the first treasurer of Jersey county after its organization. He held the position four years, filling it with general satisfaction. The Colonel is one of the oldsettlers of Jerseyville and is highly respected by his fellow citizens.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


CHARLES H. BOWMAN was born in Troy, New York, March 12, 1822. He was the third of a family of six children of Elisha and Eunice Bowman. On the twenty-seventh of September, 1836, Mr. B landed in the present limits of Jersey county and soon after located on a farm in Township 8, Range 10. Mrs. Bowman died March 13, 1856 and Elisha Bowman survived his wife till October 15, 1871.

Charles H. was educated in Troy, New York, and came to this state with his parents and followed farming till 1838 when he was elected sheriff of Jersey county, and has been since twice re-elected, and now in the fall of 1872 he is again a candidate.

Mr. Bowman has always filled the office with marked ability and his recent nomination attests the appreciation in which he is held by the Democratic party, in the ranks of which he exercises a strong influence. Till 1836 he was a member of the Whig party.

On the twenty-third of October, 1843, Mr. Bowman married Miss Mary Hooper. They had had seven children, six of whom are yet living.

For many years he has ranked among the leading politicians of Jersey county, and previous to his first election as sheriff, he was elected one of the associate judges of the county.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


STEPHEN H. BOWMAN was born in Jersey county, Illinois, December 21, 1847. He is the second child of Charles H. and Mary Bowman, old residents of this county. The subject of this sketch realized his early culture in the schools of Jersey county; also attended for a short period at Illinois College, Jacksonville. After leaving college he clerked for a few years in the banking house of Shephard & Company.

In the fall of 1870 he was elected sheriff of Jersey County, as the candidate of the Democratic party. He has filled the office with ability and honor to himself and the county. Declining another nomination, his father succeeds him in the office. Mr. Bowman, at the time of his nomination, was only twenty-two years of age, and is said to be the youngest man who has ever filled that office in the state. He was married December 14, 1871, to Miss Harriet B. Cockrell, daughter of Moses Cockrell of Jersey county.

The honorable position to which Mr. Bowman has attained merits the high appreciation in which he is held by his fellow citizens.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Tarlton F. BROCK was born in Franklin county, Virginia, July 16, 1802. He is the fourth child of Tubal and Dosia Brock, who were natives of Virginia. They settled in Missouri in October, 1817, where they remained till the fall of 1821, when Mrs. Brock died, and Mr. B. returned east, visiting in Kentucky, Virginia, Tennessee, and Georgia. He came to Illinois in January, 1836, and after visiting his sone, Tarlton F., he went to Missouri, and died in the southwestern part of that state in August, 1842, in the sixty-eighth year of his age. He had a family of five children, all deceased except Tarlton F. and Mrs. Martha, relict of James Johnson.
     The subject of this sketch was first married, September 3, 1821, to Mrs. Susanna Antrobuss, of Kentucky. By this marriage he had three children, two of whom are still living, viz: Joseph, engaged in merchandize at Elsa, Ill., and Sarah, present wife of Thomas L. Moss, of Mt. Vernon, Ill. Mrs. Brock died September 13, 1826. He was again married, February 15, 1827, to Miss Lucinda Slaten, daughter of Rev. George and Lucinda Slaten, of Carrollton, Ill. He had ten children by this union; nine attained mature years and eight are now living, and mostly well settled in life. Mrs. Brock died September 23(?), 1871. He was afterward married to his present wife, Miss Maud E. Curtis, daughter of Moses Curtis, of Iowa. Mr. Brock first settled in Greene county in April, 1825, near Carrollton, where he resided till the spring of 1829 (March 18), when he settled on the northeast quarter of section 25, township 7, range 12, where he now resides. Mr. Brock was educated in Virginia; has followed farming and teaching, having taught to some extent in Illinois and Missouri. He was the first postmaster appointed at Otter Creek post office (in 1832), which position he filled for several years. He was on the staff of Col. J. T. Askew during the Black Hawk campaign. Mr. Brock had endeavored to give his family the advantages of good education. Two of his daughters (Mary, present wife of H. Johnson, attorney, of Carrollton, Ill., and Elizabeth, present wife of George Merritt, artist, of Winchester, Ill.) were educated at the Illinois Female College, Jacksonville. Two of his sons (Tubal C.(?) of southwest Missouri, and John W., of Live Oak, Florida) were educated at McKendree College, Illinois. Mr. B. has been a member of the M. E. Church since May, 1823, and the length of his official service in the church exceeds that of any member in the Alton district. As an active, intelligent, and upright citizen, Mr. Brock is highly respected in the community where nearly forty years of his life has been passed, and in which he has been successful and useful.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Gottlieb BURKANMYER was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, January 23d(?), 1823. He is the son of Matthias and Maria Burkanmyer, who emigrated to the county in the summer of 1831, first settling in Harrison county, Indiana, where they resided about three years, when they removed to Louisville, Kentucky, remaining until the fall of 1836. At the time last mentioned, they located in Scott county, Illinois, about three miles east of Naples, where they were residing at the time of their respective deaths. Mr. Burkanmyer’s decease occurred in February, 1850, and his wife’s the year previous. They had a family of six children, four of whom emigrated to this county with their parents. Three of the four are still living, viz: Gottlieb, the subject of this notice; Frederic, who lives on his father’s old homestead in Scott county; and Philipoena, present wife of Charles H. Gires, of Sandoval, Marion county, Ill.
     The subject of this sketch was married February 8th, 1848, to Miss Mary Ann Nerk, of Hocking county, Ohio. They have had a family of twelve children – six of each sex – ten of whom are still living. They were born in the following order, viz.: Anna, present wife of Dora Wilson, residing near Jerseyville; Frederic and Matthias, who died in infancy; William, Harriet and Charlie (the latter two twins), Fanny, Laura, Daniel, Lily, Royal, and Mary Ann – all residing with their parents. Mr. B. owns several hundred acres of land, which compares well with the best lands in Jersey county in soil and culture, and is one of the substantial farmers of the county. He is esteemed by those who know him as one of the most industrious and enterprising citizens of the county.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


George W. BURKE was born in Addison county, Vermont, November 24, 1807. He is the third child of Seth and Anna Burke, who were natives of Massachusetts, and at an early day moved to Vermont. His father, whose name was also Seth, was a veteran of the revolutionary war, and one of the martyrs of our liberties, as he died soon after the war, of disease contracted while in the service. His son, Seth Burke, was engaged in the war of 1812. His business through life was farming. He had a family of seven children, three sons and four daughters, all except one attaining mature years; four of his children are still living. He died in the seventieth year of his age, and his wife in her eighty-fourth year. Mr. Burke was a man distinguished for his moral worth and energy. George W. received his early education in Onondaga county, New York, where his father lived and died. Here he followed his trade – blacksmithing. He was first married December 26, 1836, to Miss Sarah M. Barber, who died in Jersey county, July 21, 1851. He was again married, January 19, 1854, to Mrs. Elizabeth, relict of Russel Searl, of Southampton, Mass. Mr. Burke came to Illinois and settled in the fall of 1834. He entered the land on which he now lives the next year after his arrival. At this time there were only six families in Jerseyville. When Mr. Burke first settled here he followed blacksmithing, but latterly he has followed farming and devoted much of his time to improving his city property, and to city improvements generally. He laid out his first addition to the city in 1840, and his second about the year 1858. Politically, early in life Mr. Burke was, from inherent principle, an abolitionist. That love of freedom which had call for the life sacrifice of his grandsire and his compeers was indelibly stamped upon his own mind; and soon after he settled in Jersey county, when the Rev. E. P. Lovejoy was murdered in Alton, he was daily subject to the reproach and contumely which were gratuitously heaped upon the early abolitionist. This he bore, however, till the hand-writing on the wall was washed out by the blood of the nation. And this final triumph of right over might, and his own record with regard to the final overthrow of the slave power in our country, are among the most pleasing memories of the past with Mr. Burke. As an enterprising man and public-spirited citizen, he is well known in the community where nearly thirty years of his active life have been spent, and is highly appreciated for his many excellent qualities.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Rev. Patrick BURKE was born in Tipperary, Ireland, March 17, 1839. He received his classical education in the city of Limerick, Ireland, and went through his Theological course at All-Hollows’ College, Dublin. He was ordained at Alton, Illinois, February 4th, 1871, and was a professor and vice-president of St. Patrick’s College, at Ruma, Randolph county, Illinois, for some time previous to his ordination, which position he left to take charge of St. Patrick’s Church, Grafton. A lithographic view of said church appears in this work. [See 1872 Farms & Residences] The structure was commenced about three years ago, under the pastoral charge of Father Harty, and was completed December 8th, 1871. This edifice is a monument of the munificent donations of its membership. It also reflects credit upon the present pastor, who has taken an active part in securing its early completion.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Nicholas W. CARKHUFF is a native of Hunterdon county, New Jersey. He was born November 8, 1819. He is the third child of Gabriel and Lanah Carkhuff, who were also natives of New Jersey. Their ancestors were Hollanders. Gabriel Carkhugg’s occupation was that of a farmer. He died at his residence in New Jersey, July 11, 1830; his widow is yet living in the enjoyment of good health.
     Mr. Nicholas W. Carkhuff received his early education in the district schools of his native state. He was married, at the age of twenty-four, to Miss Mary V. Hoagland, daughter of Henry Hoagland, of Hunterdon county, New Jersey. They have had a family of four children, three of whom are yet living. In June ___ Mr. Carkhuff removed, with his family, to Jersey county, Illinois, and purchased a farm about three miles northeast of Jerseyville. When he came to this state he had but a small capital, but by perseverance and energy acquired a comfortable competence. A fine lithographic view of his residence will be shown elsewhere in this work. [See
1872 Farms & Residences] Mr. Carkhuff and wife are both members of the Baptist Church of Jerseyville. In politics, he is a democrat.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Ezekiel CHANCE was born in Wayne county, North Carolina, December 10,1798. He is the youngest of a family of twelve children of Benjamin and Rachael Chance, who were old settlers of North Carolina. Mr. Chance was a soldier in the war of the revolution. He participated in many of the campaigns of that struggle. In 1804 he removed with his family to Grason county, Virginia. He died, at the advanced age of seventy-seven years, in 1817. His occupation was that of a farmer. His wife was born in 1750, and died at the residence of her son, Ezekiel, at the green old age of one hundred years, four months, and three days. Mr. Ezekiel Chance was educated in the schools of Virginia. In 1816 he removed, with his father’s family, to Wayne county, Kentucky, where he cleared up a farm. When not quite twenty-one years of age he was married to Mrs. Ruth Stewart, daughter of Peter and Orpha Edwards. By that union they had two boys and one girl, only one of whom is now living. In 1828 Mr. C. disposed of hisproperty in Kentucky, and moved to Illinois, and in the fall of that year located in Madison county; remained there about one year, when he settled in the present limits of Jersey county. In 1831 he settled on the farm where he now resides. He was quite poor when he landed in this state. He is noted for his strict integrity and honorable dealing. He is now the owner of one of the most fertile and productive farms in the county. Mr. C. says he has always been an old line whig. When he votes he selects those he considers the best men, regardless of political views. Mrs. Chance died, at their residence, in the fall of 1828. He was married, in December, 1831, to Miss Elizabeth Grimes, daughter of Philip and Polly Grimes. They have had two children. Henry Clay Chance, their son, resides near the old homestead, and Louis Chance, son by his first wife, resides in Montgomery county, Illinois, near Lichfield. Mr. Chance has alwaysdevoted his attention to agricultural pursuits and stock growing, and has done considerable to develope the resources of the township where he resides. As an old settler he is highly respected by a large circle of friends.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


John T. CHAPMAN is the youngest son of the late Thomas H. and Anna Chapman, who had a family of twelve children. Mr. J. T. Chapman was born August 24, 1846, in Jersey county. His parents were both natives of Tennessee. Mr. Chapman is of Scotch descent, his wife of Irish extraction. Soon after their marriage in Tennessee, they moved to Illinois, locating on a farm in township 8, range 10, where their son, John T., now resides. He (Thomas H.) settled in the present limits of Jersey county about the year 1831, and the Blackhawk war breaking out, he enlisted as a soldier and took part in two of the principal campaigns, participating in several engagements, but was fortunate enough to escape without receiving any wounds. After peace was declared, he returned home to his family, and resumed the peaceful pursuits of agriculture. When a boy he had but limited advantages for learning; but being economical of his time andindustrious in his habits, he was enabled to gain an education sufficient for all practical purposes. When he landed in Illinois, it is said, he had only fifty cents in his pockets, but he was rich in that indomitable energy and perseverance so characteristic of the old settlers, and so he was enabled to acquire for himself and family a comfortable competence. Commencing very poor, he gained step by step in wealth, until he was the owner of a valuable farm of about twelve hundred acres of the best lands in Jersey county. When we consider the poverty of his beginning, as compared with his present estates, which is mainly the result of his own efforts, we can form some appreciation of the value of those principles of economy, integrity and industry which have marked his career as a business man. Few men of his neighborhood enjoyed a wider reputation for probity and honesty. Mr. Chapman’s word was always regarded with well-meritedrespect, and his house was always open for the weary traveler. Hedispensed his hospitality with no niggardly hand; was universallyrespected as all honest and generous man. Only four of his children are now living; they are all married and well settled in life, being among the early settlers in this state. Like many others, Mr. Chapman soon learned those hard lessons of penury and toil; but they did not discourage him. He struggled bravely on, till at last his efforts were crowned with success. In awarding him this praise, we do not mean to exclude or speak lightly of the credit due to his worthy companion. She was the faithful partner of all his joys and sorrows, and by her frugal and amiable character aided in the achievement of his financial success. Politically, in early life Mr. Chapman learned to love the principles of the Whig party, and was a personal acquaintance and great admirer of that Napoleonic statesman HenryClay, for whom he voted whenever an opportunity was presented. After the Whig party was disorganized, he became identified with the Republicans. He voted both times for Abraham Lincoln. During the late rebellion he was a strong supporter of the Union cause. Mrs. Chapman died at their residence, on the 25th of December, 1868. He survived her death until April, 1869. He was eminent among the class of self-made men, and needs no eulogy at our hands, as his life itself bears the most eloquent testimony to his many virtues.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Mr. J. T. CHAPMAN received his early education in the schools of Jersey county, and, at the age of seventeen, entered Shurtleff college, Alton, Illinois. Attended at that institution two school years. He then went to Bryant & Stratton’s commercial college, St. Louis, and received his diploma from the latter institution. He then went to Springfield, Illinois, where he attended school a short time, and thence to Quincy, where he resided about three years. After which Mr. C. returned home and assisted his father in carrying on the farm. He was married October 13, 1869, to Miss Eliza Jane Bates, daughter of Silas Bates, Esq., an old resident of this county. They have had two children, one of whom is deceased. Since his marriage, Mr. Chapman’s attention has been wholly devoted to agricultural pursuits, in which he has been very successful. He is a young man of more than ordinary energy and foresight in the management of his business affairs. A fine lithographic view of his residence is shown elsewhere in this work.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


John CHRISTOPHER, Sr., the youngest of a family of five children, was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, June 13th, 1802. His parents, John and Mary Christopher, were both natives of New Jersey, and their ancestors were Holland Dutch. John Christopher, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a soldier in the war of the revolution, participating in several of the memorable campaigns of that war. His son, the father of the subject of this sketch, was also, for a short period, in the revolutionary army, and, after peace was declared, voted for General Washington for president of the United States. Mr. C.’s occupation was that of a shoe maker. They early moved to Preble county, Ohio, where Mrs. C. died, in 1836. Mr. C.’s death occurred in 1849, while on a visit to his son, inIllinois. The subject of this sketch received his early education in the schools of Somerset county, New Jersey. When twenty-two years of age, he was married to Miss Jane Hollenshead, daughter of James and Catherine Hollenshead, of Preble county, Ohio. They have had twelve children, of whom nine are yet living, all but two married, and settled in Illinois. The family was equally divided-six boys and six girls. When Mr. Christopher commenced life, he had but a small capital, but, being a man of industry, he set about to make a home for himself and family. He is now comfortably situated in life, and, besides assisting in the development of the county, has raised a large and intelligent family. He landed in Illinois in the fall of 1843, first locating north of Jerseyville, where he lived one year, and then moved to the place where he has since resided. In politics, Mr. Christopher was first a whig. He voted first for John Quincy Adams, and voted twice for Lincoln. Mr. C. and wife are members ofthe Methodist Episcopal Church. He is highly respected as a citizen and a good Christian.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


John CHRISTOPHER was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, April 19th, 1812. His father, Cornelius, emigrated and settled in Warren county, Ohio, in the fall of 1815, where remained about two years, when he removed to Montgomery county, Ohio, residing there till his death, which occurred about twenty years ago, while on a visit to Jersey county, Illinois. Mr. J. Christopher was married, March 26, 1835, to Miss Margaret, daughter of James Whitfield, of Warren county, Ohio, formerly of Monmouth county, New Jersey. They have had by this marriage nine children, in the following order, viz: Henry, deceased; James, residing near Shipman, Illinois; Elizabeth, present wife of Emanuel Hedrick, of Fidelity; Jane, present wife of A. B. Hurdman, of Christian county, Illinois; Emeline, deceased; Joseph, residing in the village of Fidelity; Mary, present wife of Peter Lawson, residing south of Fidelity; John and Rachel J., both residing with their father. Mrs. Christopher departed this life July 8, 1870. She was loved and esteemed by a large circle of friends and acquaintances for her many virtues. Mr. C. has made farming a specialty. He first came to Jersey county in the spring of 1840, and ten years after settled on the farm where he now resides. He is one of the good, practical farmers of Jersey county. As a citizen, he has the respect of a large circle of acquaintances in the community where he has long lived and taken an active part in the welfare of society.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Edwin COLEAN, the sixth of a family of fourteen children, was born in the present limits of Jersey county, January 10th, 1830. His parents, Francis and Mary Colean, were old settlers of this county. Francis Colean, who was of French and English descent, was born at Cahokia, in the then territory of Illinois, on the 15th of July, 1794. He was a soldier in the war of 1812; was with Jackson at New Orleans, and was slightly wounded in that campaign. After his return from the war, he settled in the American Bottom, where he followed agricultural pursuits. In 1814 he was married to Miss Polly Cox. They had fourteen children, eight of whom are yet living. On the breaking out of the Blackhawk war, Mr. Colean enlisted, and took part in most of the campaigns of that early contest. Few men were more early enured to the hardships of pioneer life than Mr. Colean, having been born during the troublesome times of Indian warfare. He could remember ofhaving been, with others, frequently forced to the block-houses forsafety. After leaving the American Bottom, he moved further north, and entered the land on which his son Edwin now resides. He was a man of great energy and determination of character, and was endowed with those essential qualities of plick and perseverance so necessary to the early settlers of Illinois, when horse-thieves and marauding parties infested that portion of the state, and it was necessary to have a few such citizens as Mr. Colean to give tone to society in those early days. Mr. C and wife were both members of the Baptist church, and, as an old and upright citizen of the county, he was highly respected. He died at, his residence, November 19th, 1846. Mrs. Colean survived the death of her husband until July, 1855. The subject of this sketch attended the schools of Jersey county, and April 11, 1852, was married to Miss Nancy F. Erwin, daughter of William and Hannah Brown Erwin. They have had eight children, all of whom are yet living. Their eldest daughter, Sophronia H., attendedthe “Young Ladies’ Institute,” Indianapolis, and their son, Oliver P., attended “Bonders’ Institute,” Kentucky, Mr. C. is endeavoring to give his children the advantages of a good education. Mr. Colean’s life has been devoted to agricultural pursuits, which he has prosecuted with energy, and his efforts have been crowned with well-merited success. In politics, he is a member of the democratic party. He is frequently spoken of as one of the best farmers of Jersey county.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


James COLWELL was born in Chatham, Morris county, New Jersey, Nov. 28, 1807. He is the oldest son of John and Mehitable Colwell, who were natives of New Jersey. The Colwell family were among the early settlers of that state. John Colwell lived and died on the same farm which had been owned by his ancestors for a period of at least one hundred and fifty years. James Colwell received a common school education in his native state. He was married in February, 1836, to Miss Martha, daughter of Ephraim and Mary High, of Morris county, New Jersey. They have had by this union three children, in the following order of birth, viz: Mehitable, present wife of Thomas Armstrong, residing two miles south of Fidelity; Hannah, deceased, former wife of John Hoppe, of Fidelity township, section 26; and Mary, residing with her parents. Mr. Colwell emigrated to the west and settled in Jersey county in July, 1841. He first located near Jerseyville, where he remained till the spring of 1843, when he removed to the southeast quarter of section 23, township 8, range 10, where he now resides. Mr. C. began life with a small capital, but by persevering energy and good management has acquired a competence, and ranks among the first-class farmers of his community. He takes pride in doing well whatever he undertakes. He has achieved the object of his life as an agriculturist, i.e., to become a practical farmer. Mr. Colwell is highly esteemed as a man and citizen by all who know him. The labors of an upright, active life speak more eloquently than we possibly can in the limits of this short sketch.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Abraham COOPER was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, November 17, 1811. He was the second child of Abraham and Jane Cooper, who were also natives of New Jersey. Mrs. Cooper’s maiden name was Baird, the daughter of Major Baird. Mr. Cooper died before the birth of his son Abraham. The subject of this sketch received his early education in the district schools of Somerset county. By the death of his father he was in early life thrown on his own resources, and when only fourteen years of age, became an apprentice to learn the mason’s trade; and at the age of twenty-four, was married to Miss Maria Nevins, daughter of Christopher and Sarah Nevins, of Somerset county, New Jersey. They had a family of ten children, of whom five are yet living. Three are married, and all residents of Illinois. In April, 1838, Mr. Cooper landed, with his family, in Jersey county, Illinois, bringing with him his widowed mother, who died in 1858. Mr Cooper located in Jerseyville, where he worked at this trade about fourteen years. He assisted in building the court house. In 1852 he moved on the farm which he had previously purchased, situated about five miles northeast of Jerseyville, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits during the remainder of his life. When Mr. C. became a resident of this state he was quite poor. He had lands situated in different places, altogether upwards of three hundred acres, some of the most valuable lands of the county. Mr. Cooper was a gentleman who, by the rectitude of his life, won the respect of a large circle of friends. Quite early in life he became a member of the whig party, and on its disorganization joined the rank and file of the republican party. He voted both times for Abraham Lincoln and once for U. S. Grant, and during the late civil war the Union cause had in him an active supporter. His death occured at his residence, on the 28th of August, 1872. Such is the narrative of the life and career of one of the old residents of Jersey county. Mr. Cooper and wife worshipped at the First Presbyterian Church of Jerseyville. At present the widow and two sons are residing at the old homestead.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Capt. Jonathan E. COOPER is a native of Henry county, Kentucky. He was born on the 5th of January, 1807. His father, Jonathan Cooper, Sr., was a native of Maryland, and was one of the early settlers of the “dark and bloody ground.” He was among the pioneer settlers with Daniel Boone, with whom he frequently hunted Indians, and he was also a soldier in the revolutionary war. He married Eleanor Jones, his first wife, in Pennsylvania, by whom he had six children. His second marriage occurred in Shelby county, Kentucky, to Miss Eleanor English. They had twelve children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the eldest son and second child — five of the family, yet living, being residents of Illinois. In 1835 he removed to Jersey county and settled on a farm southwest of Jerseyville four miles, where he died in August, 1845. Mrs. Cooper survived his death eleven years. Capt. Cooper received his education in the schools of his native state; spent most of his time at home on the farm until the age of 23, and, in November, 1829, after a trip of thirteen days, on horseback, landed in the present limits of Jersey county, Ill. He spent nearly the first winter clerking in the store of his uncle, L. N. English, of Carrollton — the next year working on a farm. On the breaking out of the Black Hawk war he enlisted in Capt. Carlin’s (since Gov. Carlin) company; was elected orderly sergeant; served one year underCarlin; the next year (1832) he served in Capt. Patterson’s company, and a portion of that year was detailed as quartermaster; was at the battles of the Wisconsin and Mississippi; and after peace was declared he received an honorable discharge. In October, 1832, Capt. Cooper entered the land on which he now resides, two and a half miles southwest of Jerseyville. In 1832 he was commissioned captain of militia by Gov. Reynolds. When he came to Illinois, his wealth consisted of a horse, and three dollars in money. After entering his land, he soon set about to improve it and make a home. Being an old settler, he had many hardships and inconveniences to encounter. On the 19th of May, 1830, he was married to Mrs. Miriam F. Turner, daughter of Nicholas and Anna French. She is a native of Rockingham county, New Hampshire. The Captain and his bride moved into their cabin on the first of August, 1836, and have resided on the identical spot ever since. Politicially, in early life he became a member of the democratic party, and has voted that ticket ever since, his firstvote having been cast for General Jackson. Since 1839 Capt. Cooper and wife have been members of the Baptist Church, uniting first with the church at Kane, Greene county. They are among the original members of the Baptist Church at Jerseyville (only six of the original members now survive). The first year of the organization of this church, Capt. Cooper was elected to the responsible position of deacon, which he has since retained. Deacon Cooper is among that class of noble-hearted citizens whom we all love to respect. Strict integrity and honesty of purpose mark all his dealings.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Archibald CRAIG was born in Princeton, New Jersey, August 14, 1814. He is the tenth child of John I. and Elizabeth Craig, who were citizens of New Jersey. His father was of Scotch descent, and his mother (Elizabeth Schenck) of Holland. Mr. A. Craig came to Jersey county in June, 1841. He settled where he now resides in December, 1844. Mr. C. was married, January 2, 1843, to Miss Catherine E., daughter of Louis F. Hankerson, of Jerseyville. By this union they have had a family of eleven children, three of whom are deceased. Those living are in the following order of birth, viz: William A., residing near Wichita, Kansas; George and Elizabeth (twins, the first deceased); Archibald, jr.; Tunis V.; Eleanor H.; Caroline S.; Henry M.; and Gerrit S. who are residing with their parents. Mr. C. is a worthy citizen and a practical farmer.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Note: _?_ indicates an unreadable word or words

Hugh N. CROSS was born December 9, 1817, in Somerset county, New Jersey. His father, John L. Cross, was a native of the above county and State, and his ancestors have also resided there for many years. Mr. J. L. Cross was twice married; his first wife was Mary Kirkpatrick, by whom he had four children. After her death he married to Miss Mary Nesbitt, by whom he had one child, viz: Hugh N. Cross. The ancestors of Mr. Cross and wife were Scotch Irish. His occupation was that of a farmer. In 1835 he removed with his family to Jersey county, Illinois, locating on a farm about three miles south of the then thriving village of Jerseyville. Mr. Cross was over seventy years of age when he settled in this county. In 1850 he died at his residence, at the advanced age of eighty-two. Mrs. Cross died about two years previous to the death of her husband. Mr. Hugh N. Cross was educated in the common schools of his native State, attaining a good business education for those times. He came to this county with his parents in the fall of 1835, and remained on the farm with them until their death. When about twenty-five years of age he was married to Miss Ann _?_ Van Horne, daughter of Col. Elijah and Mary Van Horne, who were formerly of New York, though they were _?_ settlers in this county, having located here in 1833. Mrs. Cross was born in _?_ county, New York. Mr. Cross and wife have had five children, four of whom are yet living, one son and one daughter married and residing in Jefferson county, Illinois. When Mr. Cross _?_ life he was comparatively poor; but being a man of energy and good judgment in matters of business, he soon commenced to acquire property, and by the careful management of the same he is now in the possession of a handsome competence, the result of a life of frugality and perseverance. At one time he was about the largest farmer of Jersey county. In all his long life he has retained a purity of character and straightforward course in his business operations. Until 1865, agricultural pursuits and stock growing had engrossed most of his time and attention, and in that year he formed a partnership with Mr. George R. Swallow, and together they opened quite an extensive banking house in Jerseyville. In politics, Mr. Cross has always been a strong adherent to the principles of the Democratic party. Religiously, he and his family worship in the First Presbyterian church of Jerseyville. He is among the older citizens of the county, and stands prominent among the solid man. In him we find a genial, whole-souled gentleman. He is unquestionably a self-made man, and needs on encomium at our hands.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Hon. Joel CORY was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, on the 26th of August, 1805. He was the eighth of a family of nine children, of Parkes and Joanna Cory, who were also natives of the same state. His ancestors were Scotch. His (Parkes Cory’s) occupation was that of a carpenter. He and his wife both died in New Jersey. The subject of this sketch received his early education in the common schools of his native county, attaining (for those days) a good solid English education. After leaving school he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. Mr. Cory was married, on the 26th of March, 1828, to Miss Sarah Cross, daughter of John L. and Mary Kirkpatrick Cross. Mr. Cross was among the early settlers of Jersey county. As the fruits of the above mentioned union, Mr. and Mrs. Cory had a family of twelve children, five of whom are deceased. All have beenmarried with the exception of the youngest son. Four were born in Somerset county, New Jersey Mr. Cory disposed of his property there, and removed with his family to Illinois, locating in that part of Greene county now Jersey county, in the fall of 1834. He entered a farm two and one-half miles south of Jerseyville, where the family yet reside. When Hr. Cory came to this state he had but a small capital, but with that characteristic energy and perseverance of the old settlers, he set about to make for himself and family a home. As a business man he was very successful. They had to encounter the privations and inconveniences of the early settlers. He accumulated a handsome competence and owned a valuable landed estate; four hundred acres of it is in one body, and constitutes the home place. When we take into consideration the fact that Mr. Cory came here poor, and accomplished in life what he did, his example becomes a noble illustration of those principles of industry which actuated hiscareer as a business man. He was a man whose dealings were alwaysstraightforward and honorable. Mr. Cory and wife joined the Baptist church about twenty years previous to the death of the former. Mr. Cory was elected deacon of the church of which he was a member, about 1850. He served one term in the Illinois legislature, as member from Jersey county. In early life he became a member of the democratic party, and adhered to its principles during life. He died at his residence, on the 26th of February, 1872, beloved and respected by a a large circle of friends. Mr. Cory was among the older and more prominent citizens of Jersey county, and was noted for his benevolence and pure Christian character. Few gentlemen in this county were more warmly appreciated than the venerable subject ofthis sketch, and few have contributed more to the wealth and development of the county. He has raised a large family of children who are among the respectable citizens of the county. Mr. Cory was a self-made man, and needs no eulogy at our hands, as his life and work, and what he has accomplished, speak more eloquently than any words of praise we might add. His widow, now at the advanced age of sixty-six, is residing at the old homestead in the enjoyment of excellent health.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Hon. Thomas CUMMINGS was a native of Monroe county, Illinois, and was born March 4, 1800, in a block house erected for defense against the Indians. He was the eldest child of Josiah and Sabrah Cummings, who had a family of seven children, all of whom are now deceased. Josiah Cummings was a native of Connecticut. His ancestors were Scotch, and were among the early pioneers of New England. He witnessed the battle of Bennington, Vermont, during the revolutionary war, and was a soldier in General Wayne’s campaign against the Indians; was present at St. Clair’s defeat, and was among the earliest settlers in the territory of Illinois. It was there, in that almost uninhabited district of country, that he became acquainted with Mrs. Gilliss, who afterwards became his wife. His occupation was that of a farmer. They both died in close proximity to the place where they had so long resided in this State. Mr. Cummings, being born in a sparsely settled district of country, had but very meagre facilities for obtaining an education; yet through all the disadvantages of pioneer life, by close application and industry, he was enabled to acquire the rudiments of an English education, and by constantly adding thereto, gained considerable knowledge. He was fond of reading history and was well versed in the political topics of the day. He spent considerable time in assisting to survey the government lands. Served for a while in the militia, or rangers’, service; then enrolled for the purpose of guarding the frontier settlements. When not employed in that capacity, he assisted his father in carrying on the farm. On the 8th of September, 1824, he was married to Miss Mary Ann Carroll, daughter of John and Mary Carroll, who were formerly from Ireland. They first settled in New Jersey, and in Bergen county of that State Mrs. Cummings was born. Mr. Carroll and son settled in the present limits of Jersey county in 1818. The balance of his family came two years after, and spent the residue of their lives in that county. Immediately after his marriage, Mr. Cummings purchased a farm atgovernment prices in close proximity to the old homestead, and was for many years engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Cummings and wife had nine children, five of whom are yet living. Mr. C., being born in the territory in its infancy, of course had but little money; but with his strong arm and brave heart he set about to carve out of the rough material a home, in which he was eminently successful. He died in the possession of a handsome landed estate; his farm numbering over two thousand seven hundred acres of some of the best lands of Jersey and Macoupin counties. The same body of land remains in the possession of the family. The success of Mr. Cummings, achieved by his own individual exertions, by his integrity, industry and good management, is an ample commentary on the excellency of the policy and principles which actuated his career as a business man, and are deserving of high commendation. During his long residence in the county, he was noted for his benevolence and hospitality, which he dispensed with an ease and grace known only to the older settlers. He would always cheerfully welcome the traveler to his board. In early life he became a member of the Whig party, and Henry Clay was his beau ideal of a statesman. Mr. C. was always an active politician, discussing with ability the qestions of his day. He was ever an opponent of the institution of slavery, and voted against admitting Illinois as a slave state. One summer, in company with ex-Governor Wood and Willard Keys, he made a trip over the military tract to look at the land. After the Whig party was disorganized, he became a supporter of the Republican party, and in the fall of 1846 was elected to a seat in the legislature of Illinois, filling the position with honor and ability. A short time previous to his death he became a member of the Methodist church. His demise occurred at his residence, November 21, 1856. Mr. Cummings was among the more prominent and influential citizens of the county. His widow, two sons and one daughter reside on the old homestead.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Hiram CURTISS was born near Marietta, Ohio, May 13th, 1816. He settled in Jersey county in the fall of 1833. He located east of Otter Creek post office, where he resided till the fall of 1843, when he removed with his family to Galena, Illinois, where he was engaged in smelting lead until his death, which occurred July 11, 1849. He was married, April 23, 1835, to Miss Ann Eliza, eldest daughter of Wm. G. and Janet Maria Dougherty (see personal history of Henry E. Dougherty elsewhere in this work). The subject of this sketch had a family of six children (still living), in the following order of birth, viz.: William, residing with his mother on the old homestead, which she purchased in the summer of 1856, east of the village of Otter Creek, where the family has since resided; John Thomas, who is a practicing physician at Otter Creek; Leander, now in Texas; Reuben N., in Montgomery county, Illinois; Rowena Louisa, present wife of Frederic Giers, who is a merchant at Otter Creek; and Ann Eliza, present wife of Wm. McAdams, Jr., residing in township 7, range 12. Mr. Curtiss was a good, upright citizen, highly esteemed by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance. His wife has long been an active and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and is permitted to live in the community where she has had an acquaintance of over forty years, an ornament and blessing to the society.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page

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