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World War I Newspaper Articles

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June 14, 1917

ONLY ONE ALIEN ENEMY WITHIN JERSEY COUNTY SAYS DRAFT FIGURES
Total of 1,022 Young Men Register to War on Germany. Over Half Asked to be Excused. Twenty-four in County Totally Disabled — Eight of 10 Colored Folks in County Presented no Excuses.

There is only one alien enemy in Jersey County between the age of 21 and 31, and he lives in third Jersey precinct, according to the official figures compiled by those who reigstered the young men of the county one week ago Tuesday for the approaching army draft. An alien enemy is a subject of Germany, against which nation alone the United States is at war. Strange to say Richwoods township in which reside many persons of German descent, has no alien or alien enemy within its borders.

Total of 1,022 Sign
A total of 1,022 young men in Jersey county signed up for draft, of which 443 presented no excuses why they should not be made to go to war. Twenty-four claimed to be totally disabled and 519 have dependent relatives whom it would be difficult to leave.

Colored Folks Loyal
The colored folks of Jersey county, of which there are 10 between the prescribed ages, are not slackers. Eight of them claimed no exemptions. Six live in second Jersey and one, each, in third Jersey, first Jersey and Piasa. The Piasa man asked to be exempted.

One hundred and seven young men signed are 21 years of age, 108 are 22, 104 are 23, 99 are 23 106 are 25, 106 are 26, 99 are 27, 91 are 28, 109 are 29 and 93 are 30.

Interesting Summary
The following is a summary of the registration in the precincts of Jersey county, the first figures, representing the total number registered, the second the number asking no exemptions, the third those who wish to be exempted and the fourth the total number of aliens:

Elsah, 35, 14, 22, 3
English, 79, 27, 52, 0
Fidelity, 72, 31, 41, 0
Jersey one, 130, 53, 79, 1
Jersey two, 139, 82, 57, 1
Jersey three, 95, 36, 59, 1
Mississippi, 75, 22, 53, 0
Otter Creek, 62, 20, 42, 0
Piasa, 56, 24, 32, 0
Quarry, 106, 58, 48, 3
Richwoods, 91, 323, 59, 0
Rosedale, 46, 29, 17, 0
Ruyle, 36, 15, 21, 0


LETTERS FROM OUR SOLDIER BOYS, 1917

Mr. and Mrs. James SUNDERLAND received a letter from their son Wayland who is now in the service of Uncle Sam. He has been in the navy as a wireless telegraph electrician for a total of nine years. He was a mere lad when he enlisted. Since his enlistment he has been in most of the European countries and has seen much of the world. He witnessed the sinking of a British ship. The letter follows:

Camp Lewis, WA
Dear Mother: I haven’t written to you in a long while and am thoroughly ashamed of it. The fact is that things have been so unsettled that I kept putting it off until I should know what I was going to do until I arrived here in the army. I registered at Seattle, WA, and when my name came up to go I did not claim any exemption as I thought it my place to go. You know I was exempted if I wanted to claim it as all men holding government license as officers of US Merchant ships are exempt and I hold a first grade radio license, but I feel that the army is where I am needed right now so I came. I am at present at mobilization camp, one of the 18 in the US, which is situated at Camp Lewis and am awaiting orders to be sworn in the signal corps. Now you don’t have to write until I find out what company I will be in as your letter would go astray as there are about 40 thousand men here and they are all in the same fix. But as soon as I find out where I will be stationed I will write and give you my address and then you can tell me everything. I am trying to write this letter in such a hurry as I have only a few minutes to spare and so naturally I am unable to tell you everything. But in a couple of days or so I will know where I am to be and then I will write you and Pop a long one.I have lost the boy’s address again in moving but you give them my best and send me their address when you answer. Must close now as time is up. With love,Your son Wayland.

Dear Mother: I am not at Fort Warren any more. I have been away for over a month. I left there the 15th of August. Under certain conditions I am not able to let you know where I am, but try putting the above address on my letters. It will be forwarded to where I am.The letters I write cannot tell you very much because we are forbidden to describe the country or where we are. I am in fine health and I like my new company and also the place where I am. It will be a long time between letters now but I will write again in a few weeks. Tell all my friends I am o.k. and if they want to write to me give them that address. I suppose you can guess about where I am at. Do not worry about me, if anything happens they will notify you as soon as possible. Well mother, I hope everything turns out all right, so I will be able to tell you everything. I will have to close now, hoping to hear from you next month some time. Your son Scott
John S. Wood, Battery “L” 7th Regt. CAC, USA Am. Expeditionary Force Via New York

Camp Clark, Nevada, MO
Dear Brother: I will drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well and feeling fine, for there is no chance to stay out at night; everybody is still at 10:45 pm and a man feels like getting up in the morning. We have not had a payday yet but are expecting it tomorrow as some of the boys got paid today. We get up and take a mile or two run and come in to mess at 7 am. The exercise is what makes us feel good. Well we only have to drill four hours a day and the rest of the time is ours to wash our clothes and clean up in and shine that said gun. Haven’t gotten any bullets yet but expect some in a few days as they are already in camp, but haven’t been issued to us yet. I just heard a speech which a major from France gave on the life of soldiers in the trenches in France. It sure would make cold chills run down your back to hear him speak. Only about 10,000 men were there to hear what they were facing in the foreign lands. They are talking of doing away with the trenches as the men get in them and are killed, where those were saved who lived outside. He said that on the battlefield there that the ground is poison that if you got your hand cut it almost meant death to you as the ground is almost covered with poison germs. Well if there are any boys back home that haven’t gone yet we can use them in our company as it isn’t filled up to war strength yet. We would be glad to have them come. You can write and let me know how the folks are getting along and also the boys at the plant. I guess you all keep busy this time in the year. I will close hoping to hear from you all soon. Tell all the boys at the plant I said Hello to all of them.
Your brother, Orlin S. Nelson; Camp Clark, 5th Mo. Inf.; Co. C, Nevada, MO.


HARRY EASTHAM OF JERSEYVILLE IS FIRSTHarry W. Eastham of Jerseyville, heads the list of those who registered for military service June 5th, and whose numbers were drawn from a bowl at Washing, D. C., Thursday . His registration number was 10. The boys all of whom became 21 years old since June 15, 1917, are busy filling out their questionnaires which will be a base for classifying them and which will be another factor in determining when whey will be called for service. The boys’ number were drawn in the following order.

1. Harry W. Eastham, Jerseyville
2. Oscar W. Frazier, Jerseyville
3. G. H. VanHorne, Jr. Jerseyville
4. Robert M. Wylder, Jerseyville
5. Henry E. LaMarsh, Grafton
6. Clarence W. Godfrey, Delhi
7. Elmer L. Hanold, Brighton
8. Ralph N. Monk, Jerseyville
9. John Elston Flamm, Jerseyville
10. Frederick Shaw, Grafton
11. Loren E. Stanley, Jerseyville
12. Chas. Desherlia, Grafton
*13. Andrew L. Kitbmiller, Jerseyville
14. James Edwards, Jerseyville
15. Edward Westfall, Fieldon
16. Harry A. Schattgen, Jerseyville
17. Charles E. Lock, Jr., Dow
18. Walter R. Ryan, Medora
19. Floyd L. Steinkuehler, Jerseyville
20. John Wahle, Otterville
21. Olin Long, Jerseyville
22. Wm. Stanley Miller, Jerseyville
23. John Ferenbach, Jerseyville
24. Robert Goodrich, Grafton
25. Wm. B. Whalen, Grafton
26. Clarence Brocken, Jerseyville
27 Roy Spencer, Fieldon
28. Frank X. Fleming, Jerseyville
29. Patrick L. Coleman, Jerseyville
30. Russell Powel, Jerseyville
31. Robert E. Breitweiser, Jr., Dow
32. Chas. W. Bradley, Fieldon
33. Frank Orban, Jr., Delhi
34. Carl Emil Meyer, Jerseyville
35. Wm. J. Kallal, Jerseyville
36. Chas. Hagen, Dow
37. Preston Bligh, Jerseyville
38. Lee R. Young, Kane
39. Hugh A. Roberts, Jerseyville
40. John B. O’Donnell, Jerseyville
41. Fred Widman, Dow
42. Frank D. Brown, Eldred
43. Clarence Keehner, Jerseyville
44. James P. Jennings, Delhi
45. Theodore J. Boehler, Delhi
46. Amil A. Darr, Jerseyville
47. Geo. W. Barnett, Delhi
48. Clarence N. Johnson, Dow
49. Lawrence F. Finkes, Dow
50. Isaac F. McCollister, Jerseyville
51. Robert Frazier, McClusky
52. Walter G. Krueger, Fieldon
*53. Thomas E. Touhy
54. LLoyd Collenberger, Jerseyville
55. Wm. E. Miller, Fieldon
56. Perry E. Sunderland, Jerseyville
57. Charles W. Day, Jerseyville
58. Charles Rothe, Delhi
59. D. H. McDow, Grafton
60. Len H. Schoeberle, Brighton
61. Charles Bouska, Kane
62. Everett Parsell, Jerseyville
63. Walter Dependahl, Delhi
64. Theodore L. Groppel, Jerseyville
65. Paul L. Feyerabend, Jerseyville
66. Wm. J. Ritchey, Kane
67. Truman Liles, Jerseyville
68. Geo. Albert Hardy, Jerseyville
69. Leslie C. Carpunky, Grafton
70. Chester Darr, Jerseyville
71. James G. Wilton, Kemper
72. Louis T. Walters. Rockbridge
73. Louis K. Erb, Dow
74. Ralph V. Large, Brighton
75. Joseph R. Lillis, Medora
76. Herbert F. Watson, Jerseyville
77. Wm. Earl Hughes, Jerseyville
78. Fred E. Bridges, Jerseyville
79. Pearl I. Jones, Jerseyville
80. Raymond E. Cory, Grafton
81. Hugh Ware Cross, Jerseyville
82. Willie Rister, Elsha


JAMES H. MADDEN TELLS OF CAMP LIFE

Camp Pike, Little Rock, Ark.April 10, 1918
     I am the only one from Jersey County in this company but there are four of us here in the Field Hospital Battalion of the Sanitary Train. Pearl Rodell and Thomas Arter are in the 346th Infantry and Frank Dunlope is at the Cook’s and Bakers’ school of the Quartermaster’s Corps, and that is the total of the delegation from Little Jersey.
     We are still in No Man’s Land but all hope to get in closer touch with the Kaiser and his men in the near future. Nobody ever knows anything positively in an army especially one so far away from the firing line and most of our hopes of an ocean voyage have been crushed heartlessly and we have waited while the more fortunate fellows went ahead. Perhaps we will find a lot of unpleasant things connected with campaigning in the field, and thee is certain to be more danger and sickness; but I believe this kind of soldering is the hardest kind of all. Nothing happens and after five or six months the average man wants a change of scenery. It makes a fellow feel dissatisfied to think that he must stay in a quiet camp while his comrades are at the front killing Germans and getting all the great satisfaction that must belong to such actions. We are ready and waiting, more or less patiently and we know that the word will come some day that will send us down a “long, long trail.’ We have been doing a lot of drilling and preparation the past six months, since the weather has warmed up somewhat and practically every organization in camp is drilled up to the point where they can go on a moment’s notice. The entire division passed in review before Major General Sturgis on the occasion of his return from France about a month ago and of more than one hundred lines that passed the reviewing stand practically every one was straight as a die and these men who six months previously had come up from the farms and cities of Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Ohio, Kansas and the Dakotas were in everything except actual experience Regulars. One could not help thinking that the Kaiser would get a hard jolt on that day when, beside the brave armies of France and England should stand this incomparable infantry, better that any Prussia has ever put on any field in any war. And there are a great many such camps in the country turning out just as good soldiers as these.
     Now that the issue is clearly drawn and we can see the German Machine in all its rude barbarity, we no longer desire for the war to come to an early end unless our victory shall be indeed conclusive and overwhelming. We consider it a great privilege to have a part in this great work and there are very few men in the National army who would go back to their homes if they had a chance. They understand it all now. In some sense they are all volunteers, and the name “conscript” has come to have a bitter sting and “slacker” is a term that no one could get away with. The new army will give a good account of itself over there no matter what may come and no one will be denied a chance to achieve honor and glory. I do not mean to suggest tht the Regulars, will not also do their own great part and live up to the traditions of their glorious past, for they are the best in all the world, and without their help it would have been very difficult to drill and discipline the mighty army that we have today. We envy them the privilege of going first into the battle, but the honor is rightfully theirs, and we have gladly waited until out turn should come knowing that we would be better prepared. The Kaiser is making a great Mistake, however, if he thinks the new army will not fight.
     We have a great many colored soldiers in this camp, about five thousand and having come in during the week of March 29th. They take to drilling naturally and would make good infantry, but in this camp most of them are assigned to the Engineer Corps and after some elementary drill in the use of pick and shovel they find themselves “sure enough” Pullman Train, bound for Newport News, and then to France to dig Trenches and build military railways and roads. The uniform makes some of them feel rather important and “sassy” but there has been very little trouble between races here. They are generally quartered in some part of the camp apart from the white regiments and there is no cause for the two races to come in contact. As a rule the [remainder of article missing]


GRAFTON. May 1918. Spends Furlough with Parents.

Gregory Rippley, the third son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Rippley, who has been in training since October 1st at Camp Donaphin, departed Monday for camp after spending a seven-day furlough with home folks. Gregory makes an excellent looking soldier and he likes his work fine. He belongs to 128th company, Missouri Artillery. He has been machine gun instructor at Camp Donaphin for some time. He says according to instructions, his company will soon be leaving for “somewhere in France.”


May 1918

CABLEGRAM FROM SON IS RECEIVED AT MIDNIGHT. Just as the family clock at the G.Y. CAMPBELL residence northeast of Jerseyville was announcing midnight Friday, May 1, the telephone bell rang and the night operator read a message to Mrs. Campbell from her son Virgil Campbell, who is in the services of Uncle Sam “over there.” Mrs. Campbell had given instructions to the telegraph operator to send her any messages from Virgil that might arrive, regardless of the hour received. The following simple message was Virgil’s May basket to his mother, father and sisters: “Still in England. Well and happy.” The message was sent from London, England, which indicates that Virgil is visiting in the world’s largest city and might have been the guest of the British king and queen, who entertained some United States troops that day. G. LESLIE DOUGHERTY, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Dougherty, east of Jerseyville, who is with Virgil, also signed the telegram, which took less than a day to cross the ocean and reach its destination.


May 1918

President Asks His People to Pray May 30

President Wilson did one of the greatest things of his life when he issued a proclamation to the people of the United States to set aside Decoration Day, May 30, as a day of prayer and fasting. Rev. W. S. Neely, pastor of the Presbyterian church in Jerseyville, says regarding the unique proclamation:

“The people have been asked to economize, sacrifice, buy bonds and give to the Red Cross, Y. M. C. A., and K. of C., but now they are asked to get into their very vitals and pray. The response to this appeal will reveal the depth of the sincerely of America’s belief in the righteousness of her cause. America must pray as well as give.”

Special prayer services will be held at the Baptist, Methodist and Presbyterian churches on Thursday at 10:30 a.m., and the pastors of the various churches are asking that the members of their various congregations attend both as a religious and patriotic duty. Those who have no particular affiliation are welcome to attend the services at any church.


BIG PATRIOTIC PARADE. May, 1918

Grafton celebrated the Thrift and War Savings drive with a big patriotic parate Tuesday evening of the last week, in which more than five hundred men, women and children participated. The parade started at the school house and the children marched to the business part of town where they were joined by everyone, both young and old. After parading thru Grafton they marched to the Miller Hall where fine musical program was rendered. Music was furnished by Miss Alberta Slaten, Mrs. L. Groppel, Clinton Cope, Mr. Olin, Oran Beeman, violins; and Dan Robinson and Prof. L. E. Groppel, cornets. After the program, Mayor J. W. Newland gave a grand address from the porch of the W. S. Dempsey home, encouraging all to purchase Thrift and War Savings Stamps and help win the war.


May 1918

SOLDIERS TO PLAY BALL HERE FOR RED CROSS

Private John J. MORAN, a soldier of Jefferson barracks, St. Louis, is coming to Jerseyville tomorrow, Friday, with a team of ball players picked from the soldiers at the army headquarters at St. Louis to play a fast team of Jerseyville players composed of BEATY, WORTHY, WILLIAMS, RUYLE, BELL, MCQUERRY, WINTERS, SACKETT, POWDERLY, EASTHAM, TUOHY and NAIRN. Phil TAYLOR has charge of the home team. The game is being played to raise money for the Red Cross. A drive for $100,000,000 will be started soon and Jersey County needs several thousand dollars to meet its apportionment. Two thousand tickets will be sold. Business houses are expected to close from 2 to 4:30pm. The game is called for 2:30 o’clock at I.A.A. park.


Jersey County Republican, May 1918

THREE MORE BOYS LEAVE FOR CAMP ON FRIDAY

LeRoy Moses, Fred Meyer and John Taylor, will leave Friday for Camp Thomas, Newport, KY., to train for service “over there.” Forty-three others will go to camp, to become part of the great national army, later this month, it is reported, and this will take a great majority of those in class one, excepting farmers, who have been temporarily exempted from military service.

Register on June 4.
On June 4, all young men who have become 21 years of age since June 5, 1917 will be required to register for military service, according to an order received from Washington. Word received by the exemption board states that the 23 who left for Camp Dix, N.J., arrived there safely and have been assigned to Battery C. 308th Field Artillery. They arrived in camp safely on May 1. Rumors were afloat in Jerseyville this week that a free-for-all fight occurred on the way to camp between boys from Jersey and Greene counties and that the car had been sidetracked at a station in Ohio. The fight is said to have been started by a remark made about the wife of one of the soldiers boys from Jersey county, who fainted at the depot. Two of the boys were cut up some, it is reported.


1918

FORTY-FIVE LEAVE FOR CAMP ABOUT MAY 25. NAMES OF YOUNG MEN WHO COMPOSE NEXT DRAFT CONTINGENT. MANY MORE WILL GO IN JUNE. Largest Contingent of Year Leave Next Month – Three Million Soldiers Will Be in Service by End of Year.

Within five days after May 25, forty-five young men from Jersey county will leave Jerseyville for some camp in the south as soldiers of the National Army. While it is not definitely known just who will go, the local board has submitted the names of the following young men from which the list will be made up in order given:

Names: James Loellke, Jerseyville; Frank Loellke, Jerseyville; John T. Emmons, Delhi; Jerome W. Long, Brighton; William Miles, Fieldon; Charles A. McFain, Jerseyville; Harry E. Ross, Jerseyville; Richard Wayne, Grafton; Thomas J. Flamm, Jerseyville; Thomas J. Fleming, Jerseyville; Lester R. Cory, Dow; Charles F. Kruse, Alton; Herbert M. Greene, Grafton; Alvest Cope, Grafton; Clyde Greene, Grafton; Virden M. Hemphill, Jerseyville; Charles R. Anderson, Jerseyville; George Farmer, Jerseyville; Charles W. Medford, Jerseyville; Mathew F. Coleman, Kane; Ralph R. Pickett, Jerseyville; John E. Greeling, Dow; Cornelius E. Brockman, Jerseyville; Jacob F. Dunsing, Grafton; Clyde H. McDow, Dow; Frank E. Martin, Jerseyville; Charles E. Winters, Jerseyville; Charles W. Lenz, Jerseyville; Amil Rosenthal, Fieldon; Reuben C. Spencer, Fieldon; William A. Bridges, Jerseyville; Allen Green, Grafton; Fred M. Amburg, Grafton; Raymond F. Waggoner, Grafton; William H. Seehausen, Fieldon; Thomas M. Whalen, Grafton; Raymond J. Freiman, Grafton; Bryon Slaten, Grafton; John Sougionis, Jerseyville; James J. Leeson, Jerseyville; Charles F. Stanley, Jerseyville; Joseph Sikes, Grafton; George Robinson, Jerseyville; Roland Welch, Hardin; John S. Sweeney, Jerseyville; Sammie E. Patton, Grafton; Harry Springman, Jerseyville; Henry J. Arter, Jerseyville; Leo F. Fries, Jerseyville; James J. Angel, Dow

Largest Number in June.
The largest contingent of the year will be sent to Camp next month and there will be heavy drafts throughout the summer months. Before the end of the year more than three million men will be either in France or in training. According to an order received by the local exemption board no one can go out of his order from now on.

104 to Register.
Registration of young men who become 21 years of age since the last registration, June 4, 1917, will be handled by the local board. It is expected that ten percent of those registered last June will be registered this coming June. This will make about 104.Robert Flynn of Jerseyville, who was in the contingent to leave June 25 has enlisted in the naval reserve and will go to war in about a week. Larry Chappell has asked his release as he has joined the navy in California, where he has been playing professional baseball.


June 1918

DESERTER FROM ARMY CAPTURED AT HOME IN UPPER GRAFTON. JOHN W. PROFFER OVERSTAYED FURLOUGH FROM CAMP TAYLOR.
House is Searched by Sheriff. Young Man Found Behind Sack Under Stairs. Taken to Jefferson Barracks to Await. Trial. Serious Charge.

John W. Proffer, age 29 years, son of Andrew Proffer of Upper Grafton, a National Army soldier, came home from Camp Taylor, Ky., on a 10-day furlough about the first of May and liked it so well he decided to stay. Furthermore, he is said to have exhibited two guns and expressed his intention of not going back to camp.

Taken to St. Louis.
Someone reported Proffer’s remarks to Sheriff Chappell who communicated with the officers at Camp Taylor, and they in turn gave him instructions to get Proffer, which was done Thursday. Proffer was brought to Jerseyville and lodged in jail and taken Sunday to Jefferson Barracks. When Sheriff Chappell and son Clyde and J.B. Erwin arrived at the Proffer home the family was still in bed. It was little after 7:00 o’clock. The elder Mr. Proffer came to the door and denied that his son was inside. Even after Sheriff Chappell announced his intentions of searching the house, Mr. Proffer said his son had been gone eight days and was nowhere about the place.

House Is Searched.
The house was searched from top to bottom and only by a stroke of rare good luck did Sheriff Chappell look behind a sack hung up under a stairway. There back behind a black cloth was young Proffer, who had slipped under the stairway a moment before the sheriff arrived. The cloth was still swinging when the officers pulled back the sack and arrested the young man. Proffer appeared to have just gotten out of bed and hastily slipped on his trousers, before the arrival of the officers. He had about 50 cartridges in his pockets but no firearms.

Came in During Night
When confronted with the fact that his son was in the house, Mr. Proffer said he must have arrived during the night and the son insisted that he came in at 2:00 am.


June 1918

SEVENTY-THREE BOYS LEAVE COUNTY SOON

Within five days after June 25, twenty-five of Jersey County’s finest young men will leave for Camp Taylor, Ky., to learn military tactics. It is said that Camp Taylor has been designated as a place for training artillerymen, exclusively.

Seventeen Get Special Work
Seventeen young men, besides the 55 who go to Kentucky, have been designated for special training. Among the thirteen who go to the Rihe auto school at Kansas City where they will be given a course in motors, and then sent to France are Carl Herzberger, Carl Giers, William Garber, Carl Whitlow, Clyde Griffith and Floyd Mains of Jerseyville; Clinton Cope and Henry Carey of Grafton; Everett Ryan and Clifford Tober of Medora and Gusta Burmeister of Dow. Arch Keehner, Henry Hoots and Charles W. Hunt of Jerseyville go to Bradley Polytechnic institute at Peoria to receive special mechanical training. Two more, to be named, will be assigned to the Valparaiso, Ind., to receive special workMust Give Good Meals. Uncle Sam insists upon her soldier boys getting the best there is in the line of “eats.” This was shown when the local exemption board received a voucher for a 46-meal ticket from cancellation as the food inspector rejected the 46 meals prepared for the Jersey County boys at Nashville, Tenn., where the boys ate on their way to Camp Gordon, Ga. The boys paid for their own meals and will receive their money back.


EIGHTY-TWO YOUNG MEN SIGN TO FIGHT. June 13, 1918

Eighty-two young men of Jersey County who became 21 years of age since June 5, of last year registered for military service Wednesday of last week at the office of the Jersey County Exemption Board in Jerseyville.

The first on the list is Walter Krueger, of Fieldon, a young man of German parentage, who is ready and willing to fight for his Uncle Sammy. The following young men registered in order given:

Walter Geo. Krueger, Fieldon; Clarence Keehner, Jerseyville; Roy Spencer, Fieldon; Ralph Nelson Monk, Jerseyville; Hugh Ware Cross, Jerseyville; Lloyd Collenberger, Jerseyville; Isaac F. McCollister, Jerseyville; Amil Austin Darr, Jerseyville; Pearl Iceam Jones, Jerseyville; Harry W. Eastham, Jerseyville; Patrick Leo Coleman, Jerseyville; Fred Widman, Dow; Clarence Brocken, Brighton; Perry E. Sunderland, Jerseyville; Paul L. Feyerabend, Jerseyville; John Wahle, Otterville;G.H. Van Horne, Jr., Jerseyville; Frank Orban, Jr., Delhi; Charles Rothe, Delhi; Raymond E. Cory, Grafton; Louis Karl Erb, Dow; James T. Walters, Rockbridge; James G. Wilton, Kemper; William E. Miller, Fieldon; Hugh A. Roberts, Jerseyville; William J. Ritchey, Kane; Robert Frazier, McClusky; Frederick Shaw, Fieldon; Oscar William Frazer, Jerseyville; Preston Bligh, Jerseyville; Truman Liles, Jerseyville; Walter Richardson Ryan, Medora; John Forenbach, Jerseyville; Frank D. Brown, Eldred; Rob E. Breitweiser, Jr., Dow; Charles Boushka, Kane; Leonard H. Schoeberle, Brighton; Lawrence F. Finkes, Dow; Charles Hagen, Dow; Clarence N. Johnson, Dow; Charles Edward Lock, Jr., Dow; Willie Rister, Elsah; Theodore J. Boehler, Delhi; Walter Dependahl, Delhi; Chas. Desherlia, Grafton; Leslie C. Carpunky, Grafton; Herbert Frank Watson; William B. Whalen, Grafton; Lee R. Young, Kane; Joseph R. Lillis, Medora; Edward Westfall, Fieldon; Thomas Earl Tuohy, Jerseyville; George A. Hardy, Alton; Carl Emil Meyer, Jerseyville; D.H. McDow, Grafton; Robert Goodrich, Grafton; Henry E. La Marsh, Grafton; John B. O’Donnell, Jerseyville; William S. Miller, Jerseyville; William Earl Hughes, Jerseyville; James Edwards, Jerseyville; Charles W. Bradley, Fieldon; Harry A. Schattgen, Jerseyville; Frank X. Fleming, Jerseyville; Loran E. Stanley, Jerseyville; Floyd L. Steinkuehler, Jerseyville; Geo. William Barnett, Delhi; Everett Parsell, Jerseyville; Russell Powel, Jerseyville; John Elston Flamm, Jerseyville; Charles William Day, Jerseyville; A.L. Kitzmiller, Jerseyville; Fred E. Bridges, Jerseyville; Robert Mains Wylder, Jerseyville; Ralph V. Large, Brighton; Clarence Wm. Godfrey, Delhi; James Percy Jennings, Delhi; Elmer L. Hanold, Brighton; Theodore L. Groppel, Jerseyville; Chester Darr, Jerseyville; William J. Kallal, Jerseyville; Olin Long, Jerseyville.


Jerseyville Republican, July 1918

SEVENTY-THREE BOYS LEAVE COUNTY SOON

Within five days after June 25, twenty-five of Jersey county’s finest young men will leave for camp taylor, KY., to learn military tactics. It is said that Camp taylor has been designated as a place for training artillerymen, exclusively.

Seventeen Get Special Work.
Seventeen young men, besides the 55 who go to Kentucky, have been designated for special training. Among the thirteen who go to the Rihe auto school at Kansas City, where they will be given a course in motores and then sent to france are: Carl Herzberger, Carl Giers, William Garber, Carl Whitlow, Clyde Griffith and Floyd Mains of Jerseyville, Clinton Cope and Henry Carey of Grafton, Everett Ryan and Clifford Tober of Medora and Gusta Burmeister of Dow. Arch Keehner, Henry Hoots and Charles W. Hunt of Jerseyville go to Bradley Poytechnic institute at Peoria to receive special mechanical training. Two more, to be named, will be assigned to the Valparaiso, IN., to receive special work.


August 1, 1918

BOYS LEAVE FOR CAMP TO LEARN HOW TO PUT DOWN MILITARISM
Twenty-four Left For Camp Taylor This Thursday Morning.
FIVE TO GO TO SYRACUSE, N.Y.
Two Colored Boys Will Train at Camp Dodge, Ia. — Edward McKernon Hurt in Runaway — Charles Lock Patriotic.

Twenty-four Jersey county boys left this (Thursday) morning for Camp Taylor, Ky., to learn the art and science of warfare for the purpose of putting an end to militarism as practiced in Germany. Included in the contingent are:

Ernest Ferenbach, Frank F. Loy, Thomas E. Lanham, Louis Lee Davis, Bernard J. Kallal, Henry L. Massey, Andrew Hetzel, Harry Oberlin, John H. Feyerabend, Clyde Felter, Charles H. Beach, John J. Walsh, Wesley G. Jones, Henry W. Nickens, Tony Vahl and William Steckel of Jerseyville, Louis H. Vahle, Charles Seehausen of Fieldon, Roy Piggott of Elsah, Edward Hagen of Otterville, Henry Bechtold and John R. Lock of Dow, Blaine Thompson of Grafton and Charles W. Boehler of Delhi. The alternates are William Fessler of Dow, and Frank Brockmeyer and William Loy of Jerseyville.

Five Others Go Too.
On the same train were John Seimer of Grafton, Ralph Giers, Ora R. Mathews and Chas. Anderson of Jerseyville and Johnnie Greeling of Dow who switched to another train at Godfrey to go to Syracuse, N.T., where they will learn the art of guarding the points of embarkation, the places where our boys board the ships for France. These five boys were found physically unfit for the more strenuous military service overseas. On Saturday, Amos Fairfax and Edward Brown, colored, leave, for Camp Dodge, Des Moins., Ia., for training.

Hurt in Accident.
Edward McKernon of Kemper was supposed to go with the contingent but was in a runaway and a leg was broken. Charles Lock, one of the 21-year-old registrants, found upon examination that he could not be accepted for military service as he had a slight rupture. He immediately went to the St. Lukes hospital in St. Louis where he is now recovering from an operation and will be ready soon to do his duty in service of Uncle Sam. Such patriotism is highly commendable.

Minimum Weight Lowered.
Many young men discarded as unfit for military service because of being under weight will now find themselves reclassified as the government has reduced the minimum weight from 120 pounds to 110 pounds. Of 40 young men in the 1918 class recently examined only three were found physicaly unfit for service. Dr. H.H. Gledhill says that the “Work or fight” ruling is not causing the local exemption board any trouble as most of the young men who were not engaged in “necessary occupations” when the new ruling was made, voluntarily sought occupations considered necessary in winning the war before being notified to do so.


August 1, 1918

RINTOUL FAMILY OF NEAR DOW LOYAL TO UNCLE SAM

Oscar Rintoul of Round Prairie neighborhood came to Jerseyville on Thursday to complete a deal whereby he secures possession of 12 acres of land bought of William Boedy, adjoining the Rintoul farm. The land is good and level. While in town Mr. Rintoul renewed his subscription to the Republican. Mr. Rintoul says that his brother’s name is not included in the Jersey County Honor Roll. Earl A. Rintou was born and raised near Dow. He enlisted in California December 12, 1917, and is now in the Philippine islands with the 42nd coast artillery. Morris Rintoul, son of the late John Rintoul, is another Jersey county boy who was overlooked. He enlisted in the fifth Missouri national guard and was transferred to the 130th U. S. infantry. Morris Rintoul attended Jerseyville high school two years, 1913 and 1914.


JOHN OSCAR HAD LONG TRIP TO CAMP KEARNEY. August 8, 1918.

John Oscar of Co. L., 159 Inf., Camp Kearney, Calif., writing to his father, Theo. Oscar, southeast of Jerseyville, says he and his companions get six to ten weeks’ training at Camp Kearney before they go to France.

He speaks of having had a fine trip of three days duration from Camp Lewis, near Seattle, Wash., to San Diego. Oregon looked good to him but California is “too rocky and hot” for him. The weather is cool at night, “fine to sleep.”

Camp Near Border.
The camp is 10 miles from the coast and 20 miles from the Mexican border. Just before his company left Camp Lewis, they were to drill with another company for first honors at the cantonment, but the other company backed out at the last moment, leaving them the highest honors. He is learning to wash his clothes and says, “I can wash a shirt as well as a woman, but I don’t like it very much.”

Plenty of Uniforms.
Since he entered service he has received three new uniforms. The climate is too hot for any use both in Oregon and southern California. Part of his company was sent to Indiana but he was too far down the list to be included among those who went. His first glimpse of the Pacific Ocean was secured from a train. On the way from Camp Lewis to Camp Kearney he passed through Portland, Ore., where great shipyards are located.

Stopped to Eat.
They stopped twice a day to eat and at each stop they drilled through the streets of the cities they happened to be in. A new sight to him was orange trees loaded with fruit in California. Mr. Oscar enjoys army life fine he says and he’s anxious to go across to help fight Kaiser Bill.


August 8, 1918

G. Leslie Dougherty Likes it in England

“We Jerseyville boys in No. 222, Virgil Campbell, Dick Birkenmeyer and myself are well and feeling fine. Earl Tunehorst and Mel Lipscombe are in another squadron and stationed some distance from us,” says Corporal G. Leslie Dougherty, of 222 Aero Squadron, A. E. F., N.Y., writing Rev. F. O. Wilson from St. Albans, England.

Jerseyville Boys Together
All the Jerseyville boys were on the same boat going across the ocean, but were separated when they reached England, says the writer. They had disagreeable weather, cold and rainy, for the first five or six weeks after they arrived, some time in March. England he says, is a pretty country. The land is rolling and the hedges which separate the fields are full of blossoms. Pasures are filled with daisies and buttercups, which grow wild like weeds in the United States. Houses are made of brick and stone. The roads are hard and wind in all directions.

Turn to the Left
He says he would like to ride a motorcycle over the roads but fears he would come to grief as “in city traffic their rules of the road are opposite to ours back home. They drive to the left of the road and in meeting cars pass to the left. Pedestrian traffic is the same. Few autos are seen. People walk or ride bicycles, he says.
The Y. M. C. A. is doing great work for the boys, providing recreation, entertainment and religious services. Picture shows are given twice a week. American photo plays and songs are popular in England, he says.

Keep an Eye Homeward
The boys in uniform evidently keep an eye on what the people back home are doing to help . . .writer says “No . . . to see the boys . . .seems to be the . . . make Kaiser Bill . . . Liberty Loan was . . .cess and no doubt . . . the Germans. I . . . army will be a still . . . to them. It’s all . . . now.”


August 9, 1918

Government Need Nurses. Mrs. Ella Rue of Jerseyville has established herself at the war headquarters for enrolling of U. S. student nurse reserves. The government is calling for 25,000 young women between the ages of 19 and 35 for service at home and abroad and every young woman in Jersey county should look into the possibilities of trained nursing. The enrollment of nurses close August 10. Mrs. Rue at war headquarters in Jerseyville will explain fully the proposition to anyone interested.


August 1918

Home on Furlough. Bernard Brower, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm Brower, who is attending Radio school at Chicago, came to his home in Grafton Sunday morning and will spend several days furlough. Bernard like the life of a sailor fine.

Enlists in Marines. Mason Thomas has gone to St. Louis, where he will begin training with the U. S. Marines. He will leave soon for Paris Island, S. C.


August 1918

Crowder Issues Order for Class One Selects

All draft registrants in class one, who registered prior to September 12, including the special registration of August 28, have been called into service by Gen. Crowder. All future calls will be taken from class one men between the ages of 19 and 36 years. The call, which was issued October 28, is for 2,860 class one men from Illinois, 2,395 white men go to Camp Wadsworth, the five day period beginning November 11, and for 465 colored men to go to Camp Grant the period beginning November 19. The new call in no way interferes with the call for 14,000 white men who were to be entrained October 21, but were delayed by the epidemic. The latter group will be called to entrain when quarantine is lifted, and will be sent to southern camps. Jersey county board has yet received no definite instructions.


August 1918

Young Men Must Sign Up for Military Service August 24. All Who Have Become of Age Since June 5, 1918 – 94 Draft Prospects. Ninety Four Left in Class One. Jersey County Awaiting Next Call for Men to Enter Training at Cantonment Camps – Big Registration Comes Next Month.

Every young man in Jersey county who became 21 years of age since June 5, 1918, must present himself at the office of Dr. H. R. Gledhill on Saturday, August 24, and sign up for military service. This order has been issued from the war department at Washington and if it is not obeyed there will be trouble. If it is impossible for the young man to be at the office to register in person he may register by mail providing the letter reaches its destination by the date mentioned.

Need Men for Camps
Uncle Sam is running short of raw troops and in order to tide him over until the great registration comes in September when everyone between the ages of 18 and 45 will register, he must get a few young men by registering the 21-year-old men. There are 94 Jersey county draft prospects in class one awaiting call to arms. How many of these will be called upon to enter service is uncertain, depending on how large is the reserve supply elsewhere in the state.

Ready for Call
Dr. Gledhill made out a report showing how many men were available for service and when the call comes he will furnish all that . . . needed up to 95. Indications are that the . . . demand in the next call will . . men between the ages of 32 and . . . It is said the cards of boys 18 . . old and men over 36 will be . . aside until those ages 32 . . . are used up.


August 1918

Jerseyville Girl Does Her Double Bit

Mrs. Faye Robinson Watts of Jerseyville is doing her “double bit.” Not only is she furnishing a husband, Cecil J. Watts, to fight for Uncle Sam but she is also helping in the manufacture of cartridges with which the Sammies fight. One day last week she inspected 24,452 cartridge shells at the annex of the Western Cartridge company in Alton where she is employed and for the feat was honored by having he name placed on the honor roll. She has been working at the plant only four weeks, but this did not stop her from securing the highest count of the factory during the day. Her duty is to see that only perfect shells are turned out. A small scratch disqualifies the shell. To miss a bad shell is sufficient to have returned several hundred shells for reexamination. The girls are paid so much per 100 shells examined. Mrs. Watts received over $3 for her day’s labor. But she earned it as she says the work is very painful to her eyes.


September 2, 1918

CLARENCE KEEHNER IS SECOND LIEUTENANT. Second Lieutenant Clarence Keehner, age 21 years, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Keehner of Jerseyville, arrived in Jerseyville for a short visit with his parents before going to Camp Taylor, KY to receive further instruction in the duties of an artillery officer.

Studied 12 Weeks.
For the last 12 weeks he has been studying for a commission at Fort Sheridan, IL. Being under weight caused him to doubt his ability to secure the prize, but so well did he perform the work that the commanding officers gave him his commission even though he did no qualify in weight by two pounds. He weights 120 pounds and the minimum weight for an artillery officer is 122 pounds. Mr. Keehner will spend six weeks at Camp Taylor learning the mechanism of big guns and deciphering the complicated charts by which the range is secured.

Likes Artillery Best.
Mr. Keehner, who was a junior at the state university, when he enlisted, had his choice between the infantry and artillery, and chose the latter as he considers it the more interesting branch of the service. He left Wednesday for Camp Taylor. Mr. and Mrs. John Keehner’s eldest son Arch is already in France. A cablegram announcing his safe arrival was received Monday. He was a civil engineer working for the state on roads when he enlisted in the war. In September he was sent across to help construct bridges, roads and cannon emplacements. Mr. Keehner’s eyes prevented his enlistment in the infantry. He is 25 years of age. He is a graduate of the University of Illinois.


September 1918

JERSEY COUNTY BOYS ENLIST IN ARMY AND ATTEND COLLEGE TOO. Twenty-Five To Join Student Army Training Corps. US Pays Them To Go To School. Some to Be Sent to Officers Training Schools, and Others Given Speical Work-All in Regular Army.

Twenty-five young men and possibly more from Jersey county leave this week to enlist in the army and enter college as members of the Students Army Training Corps. Carl Busch, Earl Kiely, Paul Shortal, Earl Burns, Francis Munsterman, Thornton Dolan, Harold Rives, Russel Bell, Seward Ford, James Walsh, Ortha Kirchner, Andrew Kitzmiller and others will enroll at Washington University, St. Louis. Harold Cook goes to Shurtleff at Alton And Albert Foscha will enlist at Northwestern University. The University of Illinois will enroll the following: Marshall Edwards, who takes civil engineering; Fred Penning, law; Gene Day, law; Terry Edwards, electrical engineering; F.E. Pinkerton, Jr., journalism; Hugh Cross, law, and Stewart Daniels, commercial course. Clarence Wiegand is suffering an attack of appendicitis in St. Louis and will not be able to go to college until he recovers. Two sons of Dr. Warner of Grafton will enter St. Louis University.

Shortest Route to Commission.
“The shortest road to a commission in the army is through the army training corps in colleges and universities” says President James of the University of Illinois, which is preparing to receive 5,000 men between the ages of 1 and 45 for military instruction.Any graduate, 18 years old or over, of an accredited high school, no matter what course he took, may enter a university and be received as a member of the training corps, providing he passes the physical test.

Drill and Study
Such students will be given each week 11 hours of military drill, three hours’ course on the war aims of the United States based on state papers of President Wilson and from 10 to 13 hours of regular college work selected from a choice of courses given at the university. Each student also is given free of charge (as he is a soldier in the United States army as soon as he take the oath as a member of the Students Army Training corps) board and room, instruction, medical attention, clothing and the pay of a private soldier, $30 a month. Enrollment opens September 30 and induction into the S.A.T.C. starts October 1, or within a week or so thereafter.

Many to Become Officers.
Students who show some ability will be sent to regular officers’ training schools to study for commissions. Others will be permitted to continue their studies indefinitely or permitted to take up some specialized work as chemistry, medicine or dentistry. A few will be sent to cantonments to be drafted into service. Slackers will not be protected by their having entered the S.A.T.C. When the call comes for men the Training Corps will send its quota the same as the various other districts in the state.The predominating advantage to those who enter the S.A.T.C. over those who wait until called, is the fact that the former are permitted to study their favorite courses, whether it be engineering, medicine, literature or chemistry and are paid for doing so and in addition they may get an opportunity to attend an officers’ school, while the latter are sent to the army as privates, and may never secure a commission.


September 1918

Twelve Hundred Men Within Ages 18 to 46 Register Wednesday. Jersey County to Help Uncle Sam Get Men For Army. Thirteen Million Will Sign Up. Men will Register at Regular Voting Precincts Between Hours of 7:00 A. M. and 9:00 P. M. – Young Men Called Last.

Twelve hundred men between the ages of 18 and 46 years will register Thursday, Sept. 12, for military service, according to an estimate made by Thomas Case, member of the Jersey county exemption board. A total of 1044 signed up at the last registration of men, 21 to 31 years. President Wilson signed the manpower bill Saturday bringing all men between the ages mentioned within the army draft and immediately set the date for September 12.

Next Week Busy One.
Next week will be a busy time. The Jersey County board of supervisors meets Tuesday, Sept. 10, the primary election will be held Wednesday and the great registration will take place Thursday. Gov. Lowden advises that the draft registration be postponed until Saturday. Section 4 of the orders received by the local exemption board states that : “All male persons are required to register who shall have attained their eighteenth birthday and shall not have attained their forty-sixth birthday on date of registration.” Also, “The place of registration will be the customary voting precinct in which you have your domicile (home).” The hours of registration are 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Thirteen Million Men.
At least 13,000,000 men will place themselves subject to call for service under the new registration and only those who have no dependants are physically qualified to undergo the strenuous duties of army life will be taken first. It is estimated that 839,834 men will be registered in Illinois. Eighteen-year-old registrants, it is said, will be called to service only when they are needed. In the meantime, the government will give them schooling.


Jerseyville Republican, October 17, 1918

MANY JERSEY COUTNY SOLDIERS VICTIMS OF INFLUENZA IN CAMPS

Spanish influenza, an old enemy under a new name, is prevalent in nearly every part of the county, being especially severe along the Atlantic seaboard and in military and naval camps, where it has taken its toll of Jersey county men, although no cases have been reported within the county. In Greene and Macoupin counties many cities have forbidden all public meetings.

Robert Leon Lahey, son of Mrs.Mary Lahey, Jerseyville, died at Camp Taylor, KY., Saturday, Oct. 12 at 2:20 a.m. of pneumonia following influenza. The body arrived in Jerseyville Sunday afternoon. The funeral services were held at St. Francis Xavier’s church Tuesday morning at 9:00 a.m. The Rev. Fr. J. J. Clancy celebrated requiem high mass, assisted by Rev. Frs. E. J. Eckhard and Francis Shields. Members of the Knights of Columbus, Modern Woodmen and Order of Owls attended the funeral.

James Bray died at Camp Grant, IL., Monday morning, Oct. 14. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bray, formerly of Jerseyville. The body was brought home Tuesday and the funeral services held at the M. E. cchurch Wednesday, Oct. 16, at 1 p.m., Rev. F. O. Wilson officiating. Burial was in Oak Grove cemetery.

LeRoy Cline, son of Emanuel Cline, near Fidelity, died Saturday, Oct. 12, at Camp Custer. The body was brought to Fidelity Monday afternoon. Funeral services were held at Fidelity M. E. church Wednesday morning, Rev. F. O. Wilson officiating.

John Neely Powers died Sunday morning at Camp Custer, Mich., of influenza. He was a son of james D. Powers, Jerseyville, and left for camp September 15th. The body was brought to Jerseyville Tuesday noon where the funeral was held wednesday at 2 p.m. at the residence of Loren Erwin. Deceased is survived by his father, sister, Mrs. Loren erwin, three brothers, Andrew, James and Lewis, and aunt, Mrs. James Dunphy.

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Ferenbach, west of Jerseyville, received a message Sunday that their son John had died of influenza at Fort Ogelthorpe, GA. He was reported recovering from a serious attack but suffered a relapse. Deceased was a member of the local council of the Knights of Columbus.

Charles G. Hagen, son of John G. Hagen, west of jerseyville, died at Camp Custer, Sunday morning, Oct. 13, after a short illness with influenza. The body was brought to Jerseyville Tuesday evening.


October 1918

TOTAL OF $493,500 WORTH OF BONDS SOLD IN JERSEY COUNTY
Fifteen Per Cent of People Take Bonds—Total Subscribers 2,199

EXCEEDS ALLOTMENT BY $43,500
All But Two Illinois Counties Exceed Quota Assigned By Government — Jersey County Does Well
Jersey county subscribed its allotment of Fourth Liberty loan bonds one and one-tenth times, according to the latest figures submitted by Frank D. Heller, who had charge of the Liberty loan campaign in Jersey county. Jersey county was given $450,000 worth of bonds to buy. This was exceeded by $43,950, total subscriptions being $493,500.

15% of County Subscribes
The total number of individual subscribers in the county was 2,199, or 15.7% of the population. Jerseyville responded to the call with 1,512 subscriptions—36.7% of the population—totaling $373,150. Grafton reports 344 individual subscriptions totaling $42,150; Fieldon 80 subscriptions totaling $18,000; Fidelity 58 subscriptions totaling $18,500.

Illinois Makes Good Records
It is estimated that 22,000,000 or more persons subscribed to the first $22,000,000 subscribed to the Fourth Liberty loan, the greatest war loan ever floated by any government. All but two Illinois counties made their quota, with substantial oversubscriptions in many counties. Subscriptions in the 57 Illinois counties outside Cook in the seventh district totaled nearly $120,000,000 compared to a quota of $113,100,000.


October 1918

Draft Board Sends Men For Training

The local exemption board received Saturday a call for six men to go to Bradley Polytechnic institute, Peoria, for special training as auto mechanics, carpenters, electricians, gunsmiths, instrument repairmen and lens grinders. The men selected will have an exceptional opportunity. Upon completion of the course at the institute, they will be assigned for duty wherever needed. These men, who left Tuesday morning are:

Charles Edward Lock, Jr., Dow
Lloyd Collenberger, Jerseyville
William Stanley Miller, Jerseyville
George Albert Hardy, Jerseyville
William Earl Hughes, Jerseyville
Hugh Ware Cross, Jerseyville
Thomas Earl Tuohy was alternate.


October 1918

Pvt. Robert L. Lahey. Private Robert L. Lahey, aged 29 years, 4 months, and 23 days, died at Camp Taylor, Ky., Saturday, Oct. 12, 1918, at 3:20 a.m. Funeral services were held from the St. Francis Xavier’s church, Tuesday, Oct. 15th at 9:00 a.m. Requiem high mass was celebrated, Rev. J. J. Clancy, celebrant; Rev. E. Eckhard, deacon; Rev. Francis Shiels, sub-deacon. Interment was in St. Francis cemetery.


October 1918

Will Dedicate Service Flag at Bethel Church. The community service flag at Bethel church will dedicate fourteen more stars Sunday night, Oct. 6, for boys gone to war. A sermon appropriate to the occasion will be delivered by Rev. Mr. Smith of Greenfield. The families of all the boys gone are especially invited to attend these . . . given in their honor. There . . . be a red star for one nurse . . . the Bethel neighborhood.


October 1918

Send 17 Selected Men to Camp McClellan. Jersey county exemption board received a call for 17 general service men to go to Camp McClellan, Anniston, Ala., between October 12 and 25. The men selected are:

Francis O’Donnell, Grafton
Arthur F. Watson, Fidelity
George Kirschner, Otter Creek Twp.
Edward McKernan, Kemper
Thomas Earl Touhy, Jerseyville
William Earl Miller, Jerseyville
Charles Rothe, Piasa
Leonard H. Schroeberle, Brighton
Charles Boushka, English Twp
Walter Dependahl, Delhi
Theodore J. Boehler, Delhi
Chester Darr, Dow
Ralph V. Large, Brighton
Joseph R. Lillis, Kemper
Pearl Iseam Jones, Jerseyville.
Raymond E. Cory, Grafton
William Rister, Dow

All the men of class one who registered before September 12, 1918, have now been called.


October 1918

JERSEY COUNTY VICTIMS OF INFLUENZA IN CAMPS

John Ferenbach. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Ferenbach, west of Jerseyville, received a message Sunday that their son John had died of influenza at Fort Ogelthorpe, Ga. He was reported recovering from a serious attack but suffered a replapse. Deceased was a member of the local council of the Knights of Columbus.

Charles G. Hagen. Charles G. Hagen, son of John G. Hagen, west of Jerseyville, died at Camp Custer, Sunday morning, October 13, after a short illness with influenza. The body was brought to Jerseyville Tuesday evening.


October 1918

FIRST JERSEY BOY KILLED IN ACTION

Sergeant Fred Worthy, Company K, 138th Missouri infrantry, is the first Jersey county boy to be killed in battle, notification of this death was received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Worthy, four miles east of Jerseyville. Sergeant Worthy volunteered and received his military training at Camp Doniphan, Okla., and went overseas the early part of last summer. His company was cited for especial bravery during the fighting last August. Sergeant Worthy was killed September 26. Details are lacking at this time. Besides his parents, Sergeant Worthy is survived by a cousin, Harold Worthy, in the same company, three brothers, William at Camp Custer, Francis and Earl at home, and five sisters, Elizabeth, Esther, Erma, Eva and Lucile.


October 1918

CHARLES EWIN, PIASA, DIES IN LIVERPOOL

Sergeant Charles Ewin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ewin near Piasa, died of pneumonia October 7 in a hospital in Liverpool. Sergeant Ewin enlisted December, 1917, in the marine corps and was on his way to France when he died. On account of his excellence as a sharpshooter, he was made gunner in the aviation section of the marines. Ralph Ewin, Fidelity, a brother, and Miss Mabel Ewin of Piasa, a sister, and an uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. John Ewin of Jerseyville, survive him, besides his parents.


October 1918

MARCUS WOOD DIES SUDDENLY IN PANAMA

Marcus Wood, youngest son of Mrs. Jennie Wood of Jerseyville, age 18 years, died in the Canal Zone, according to a message received by Mrs. Wood, particulars not stated. Marcus volunteered in April, 1917, while in the second year of high school. He was sent to Panama as a musician but was later transferred to the artillery. Three brothers, Scott, Glenn and Max Wood are in France, the latter arriving overseas last week. He leaves besides his three brothers, his mother and one sister, Miss Penelope Woods of Jerseyville.


October 1918

LAWRENCE DAVID FAHEY DIES OCT. 13 IN CHICAGO

Lawrence David Fahey, formerly of Jerseyville, died Sunday, Oct. 13, in Chicago at the age of 31 years. He was a son of Mrs. Bridget Fahey of St. Louis and late Patrick Fahey. The funeral service was held Wednesday, Oct. 16, at 10 a.m. at St. Francis Xavier’s church, the Rev. Fr. Clancy officiating. Burial was in St. Francis cemetery.


October 1918

PRIVATE RALPH GIERS DIES OF INFLUENZA AT COLUMBUS, OCT. 18. WELL KNOWN JERSEYVILLE BOY — SON OF MR. AND MRS. FRED GIERS. ATTENDED COUSIN’S FUNERAL HERE. Returned to Camp Two Weeks Ago — Died Suddenly — Almost 26 Years Old — Funeral Tuesday.

Private Ralph Giers, son of Mrs. And Mrs. Fred Giers of Jerseyville, died suddenly on Friday, October 18, at Columbus, O., where he was staioned. Private Giers was home on a furlough a few weeks ago to attend the funeral of his cousin, Carl Giers, who died of influenza at Camp Upton.

Illness Short
Mrs. Giers received a letter from Ralph Thursday stating that he had a cold but was doing guard duty and reporting every two hours at the hospital. Friday afternoon two telegrams came, one saying he was in a critical condition, the other announcing his death. Ralph Giers left Jerseyville August 1, with a contingent of limited service men. He first went to an eastern camp and was later transferred to Columbus, O., for guard duty. Before entering limited service, Ralph tried several times to enlist, both in the army and the navy. He was a conscienciouis soldier and a loyal American.

Popular in Community
Ralph Giers was born December 21, 1892, in Jerseyville, where he attended school. He won the friendship and respect of all who knew him, and was one of the most popular young men in the community. The deceased leaves besides his father and mother, two sisters, Mrs. Edson Dodge of Jerseyville and Mrs. Robert Bosworth of Fort Worth, Tex., an uncle and aunt, Dr. and Mrs. L. J. Giers, Jerseyville, and a cousin, Harold Giers now in the service at Camp Custer. Funeral services were held at the residence, 321 West Exchange street, at 2 p.m. Tuesday, the Rev. F. O. Wilson officiating. Interment was in Oak Grove cemetery. A large number of friends attended, among them some fifty representatives of the order of Elks. Jerseyville service flag was flying before the war headquarters in honor of the deceased.

Fine Tribute Received
Mr. and Mrs. Giers received a letter written by L. V. Bennett, Y. M. C. A. secretary with whom Ralph was acquainted, which speaks in glowing terms of the character and life of Private Giers. The letter follows:
My dear Mr. and Mrs. Giers: – In my experience as Y. M. C. A. secretary, I have never had a harder task than this, and yet I count it a privilege to carry out the last request Ralph made — “To write my folks and let them know everything is all right.” I have spent much time with Ralph today: it can hardly seem possible that . . .


Jerseyville Republican, November 1918

FIGHTS FIRE AT SEA; WOUNDED IN BATTLE

Fayette Pivoda, Grafton, was wounded at the front in a recent engagemanet, according to a letter received by his mother, Mrs. Mary Pivoda. He writes as follows:

“The division I am in is known as shcok troops and our specialty is taking points that nobody else can take. Recently the French decided to take a position or rather a part of the Hindenburg line that they had tried seven previous times to take. So they sent for our division to help them out. We took the point in a short time, a very short time in fact. But there are quite a number of us getting well now and there are some who never left the field. I am wounded in the back just below the right shoulder. A variety of shell known to the Marines as a whizz bang exloded in a trench where I was taking cover. It was only about five feet from me and the force of the explosion shook me up worse than the wound. They took out one piece of shrapnel about an inch long and shaped like a triangular pencil. There is still a piece abour the size of a pea near the lower end of my right lung but it doesn’t bother any. I wish you would please send me some more pictures as I lost all of mine on the ship. We sunk a submarine the first day out of port and the second day our ship caught fire and we had several hours of rather exciting times but were all transferred safely to another ship. The fire strted in a hold that we had our bags stowed in so everything was burned, although the ship made it back to port and is now in use again. We sank another submarine when we were two days off the coast of France. FAYETTE PIVODA, 16th co., 5th Regt. Marines, Base Hospital 27, American E. F.


November 1918

Entertain for Nephew. Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Cadwaller entertained Wednesday, November 6, in honor of the latter’s nephew, Air Lieut. Ellis V. Day and bride, who were married Monday afternoon of last week in Carrollton. The guests were Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Day, daughter, Miss Marjorie, Mr. and Mrs. Ira Day, son Willie Jr, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Day, Lieut. And Mrs. Day. Mr. Day received a telegram that evening to report back to Chanute field, Rantoul, Ill., and that he would be sent from there to an aviation field in Texas. His wife will remain with her parents Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Day of Carlinville, until her husband receives a permanent appointment.


November 1918

Try to Enlist. Zed Reddish, Jr., Leo Schneider, Frank Lowe and Seward Ford went to St. Louis Wednesday of last week and enlisted in the U. S. Service. The latter three enlisted in the motor transport corps and Zed the Marines. The boys are awaiting their calls and in all probability will be disappointed as it is doubtful whether the government will take any more into service at present or not at all.


November 1918

Pvt. Charles F. Crews Reported Missing. Charles F. Crews, in the field artillery of the American expeditionary force, is reported missing in action since October 4, according to a message from the war department received by his wife, Mrs. Etta Crews of Paradise. Pvt. Crews is a son of Mr. and Mrs. John Crews of the east side. He left here last May, going to Camp Gordon, Ga.


November 14, 1918

Former Jerseyville Boy Honored at Camp Taylor

The Probable Error, a field newspaper of the Camp Taylor field artillery officers’ training school, has the following item concerning Frank A. Warner who formerly lived in Jerseyville on north State street: “Major Frank A Warner, acting school adjutant, has received orders for report to Washington, D. C., where he will assist in forming the general staff personnel board. Until the past week Major Warner has been acting school personnel adjutant, and is at present acting school adjutant in place of Major Williams, who is absent on a tour of inspection of S. A. T. C. units. Major Warner expects to leave Camp Taylor next week upon the return of Major Williams.


November 21, 1918

TWO JERSEY BOYS KILLED IN ACTION.

Thomas Whalen. Mr. and Mrs. James Whalen of Grafton received word Wednesday that their son, Thomas, was killed in action in France Oct 27. Details are lacking at present. Pvt. Thomas Whalen was 27 years old. Before entering the service he was employed by the Rippley Boat company. Besides his parents, he is survived by two sisters, Mary Whalen of Grafton, and Mrs. Geo. Parker, Alton, and three brothers, Ed., who is in service, William, a student at Quincy, and John at Covington, KY.

John Oscar. John Oscar was killed in action October 4, according to a telegram from the war department received Wednesday by his father, Theodore Oscar, five and a half miles southeast of Jerseyville. Pvt. John Oscar sailed overseas about July 1. Before being inducted into service he was employed in a lumber mill in North Dakota. Besides his father he is survived by a brother, Charles, who was in the regular army before the United States entered the war, and went across about a month ago, and a sister, Mrs. Herman Geisler, in Piasa township.

Lawrence Welsh. The casualty list reports Lawrence Welsh, Fieldon, missing in action. No details are available. Pvt. Welsh, formerly lived with John Quinn, north of Jerseyville. At the time he entered service he was living at Fieldon.

Four Killed. The deaths of Pvt. Whalen and Pvt. Oscar bring the list of Jersey County soldiers killed in action up to four, with the possibility of a fifth name to be added. The first two, Fred and Harold Worthy, are recorded elsewhere in this issue.


November 21, 1918

CORP. HAROLD WORTHY MORTALLY WOUNDED

Corporal Harold Worthy was wounded in battle September 26 and died five days later, according to a message received Saturday night from the war department by his father, Armell Worthy, four miles west of Jerseyville. Corporal Worthy was a cousin of Sergeant Fred Worthy who was killed in the same battle, Sept. 26, and who was the first Jersey County man to die in action. Harold and Fred volunteered a few days after war was declared, April 9, 1917, enlisting in the old First Missouri, later the 138th infantry. Both were in company K, which was cited for bravery during the drive on the Vosges front.Corporal Worthy was 27 years old. Besides his father, Armell Worthy, he leaves a brother, Wesley Worthy of Jerseyville; four sisters, Mrs. Wm. Hilberer, Mrs. Wm. Fredericks, Mrs. Mary Worthy of Alton, and Mrs. Geo. Hoffnagle of St. Louis; and the family of his uncle, Frank Worthy, at whose home he and his father lived since the death of his mother 18 years ago. So far as is known, these two soldiers are the first from Jersey County to die in battle. The whole county must feel a solemn pride in their courage and devotion, and to the parents extend their heartfelt sympathy.


December 1918

WOUNDED IN FRANCE, HEROES RETURN HOME

Neil CROW and Isham LINDER arrived in Carrollton last Saturday, the first Greene County boys to return from France. Both were wounded in the battle of Chateau Thierry.Crow and Linder were with the sixth regiment of marines, cited for bravery in holding back the Germans. Crow was wounded in both legs, but recovered sufficiently to be able to return to his company before the armistice was signed. He was again wounded in both legs and was sent immediately to the United States, arriving at Norfolk December 5.Linder was wounded in the shoulder and was severely gassed. He will report at Brooklyn within 30 days to be discharged.


December 1918

ISSUE NEW WAR STAMPS FOR SALE AFTER JAN. 1

No more war savings stamps of the 1918 series will be sold after December 31, according to instructions received by Postmaster Cory. The sale of 1919 war savings stamps will begin January 1. The first month they will sell at $4.12 and will mature January 1, 1924. The same kind of thrift stamps that have been sold during 1918, will be sold throughout the coming year. The new war savings stamps are a trifle smaller in size, are blue in color and of different resign.


CORP. LOYD COTTINGHAM WRITES VICTORY LETTER. December 1918.

Corporal Loyd Cottingham, 199 aero squadron, A.E.F., writes a Christmas victory letter to his father, Col. Ira Cottingham, of Jerseyville. Corporal Cottingham has seen service in England and France, and has had some interesting experiences, but won’t be sorry to get home either. “This is Dad’s Christmas victory letter day. I am well now after a slight attack of lagrippe. Have tried to ward off all colds but this is a good country to catch colds in. Several of our boys had the flu but not as bad as you write of in the States.

“The war is over and the victory we came after is ours. It was only through the support of homefolks that we accomplished what we did. What I did was only a drop in the bucket but I guess helped a little. Our next thought is when are we going to get back to the land we all think is the best on earth. I guess we are unlucky not to get to go to the Rhine but maybe lucky enough to get home sooner, though that may mean several months yet. It will be the greatest day of my life when I do.”


1918

Meets Three Grafton Boys. William Callahan received a letter from his brother James, who is in France and who was wounded sometime ago that he is getting along nicely and expects to go back to the front soon. He has met Roland Soaphel, Curtis Freeman and Edgar Seik, three Grafton boys.

Receive Packages From France. Miss Leila Larbey was the receipient of a package last week from her friend, Private Earl Legate, who is in France. The package contained a beautiful silk apron with hand embroidered roses, a silk scarf and some pretty silk handkerchiefs with French emblems. He is with the 11th Field Artillery.

Christmas Cartons Ready. Parents and relatives of soldiers in service over there, who wish to send Christmas boxes may obtain a carton by calling at the home of Mrs. F. G. Warner. All boxes must be in and inspected by November 15.


MEADOW BRANCH, 1918

Wesley Legate Visits Parents in Meadow Branch. Wesley Legate of troop L, 1st Calvary, Douglas, Ariz., who volunteered his services to his ocuntry May 20, 1917, is spending a ten-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Luther Legate of Meadow Branch. He has been in Uncle Sam’s service over a year and says he likes the army life fine. He is anxious to sial for France. His mother is in very poor health and he did not try to visit among his relatives and frinds, as she wished him to spend time with her and have them visit him at his home. Among those who spent Decoration Day with him were: W. Legate, Mr. and Mrs. Clark Duncan and family, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Duncan and familuy, Mr and Mrs. Frank DUncan and family, Mr. Harry Duncan and friend, Miss Nellie Fox, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Legate, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Legate and little daughter Merian, Mr. and Mrs. J. B> Legate and son Robert and Mrs. Lizzie Schlansker. A general good time was enjoyed by all. Wesley departed Saturday evening for camp in Douglals, Ariz


1918

SERGEANT PINKERTON WRITES OF ARMY WORK

F.E. Pinkerton, Jr., former editor of the Jerseyville Republican, is in charge of the supply department of the University of Illinois unit, students’ army training corps, and issues clothing, cots and bedding to student soldiers. He holds the highest non-commissioned office in the quartermasters’ department, ranking as “regimental supply sergeant.”

Directs Equipment.
Sergeant Pinkerton planned and now directs the equipping of the soldiers and has supervision over 50 men at the armory, said to be the largest in the United States, at the state university, where 3,000 student soldiers are being drilled, clothed and fed.Eight companies of 230 men each are now quartered in the armory and the other six companies yet to be equipped will move into the armory as fast as permanent barracks are provided for the companies now in the building.

Profs. Complain.
Sergeant Pinkerton says in his letter: “We are having some trouble getting the men uniformed as they sent us suits suitable for men twice the size of the kids they have here. The military authorities and the university authorities are on the outs because the fellows don’t study. The KP (kitchen police) helping the cooks, doing guard duty, etc., keep the students from study and the professors roar. I have not been to drill or study since I came as I’m on special detail with the quartermaster’s office. I learned yesterday that I cannot qualify as an officer in the infantry as I am too short. Officers must be five feet four inches tall, and I lack an inch and a half.

Has Good Job.
I’ve got a good job as it is with 50 men under me. I have charge of all the cots, mattresses, blankets and uniforms and represent the department at the armory. I have to keep a great system of books and records and manage the men who issue the uniforms. It is a responsible job and interesting.”


1918

PRIVATE C.E. WARREN HAS HAD MEASLES

Private C.E. Warren in a letter to Everet Warren of Kane says he is in the hospital at Quantico, VA with measles. He was quite ill three days. Evidently Private Warren is enjoying army life as he says he went to Washington recently and spent $26 seeing the sights. Next payday he is going to Baltimore, MD, he says. In case his illness prevents his going across with the next replacement. He hoped to be able to get off in time to help with the harvest. Providing he has not been sent across his address is C.E. Warren, Marine Barracks, Overseas depot, Quantico, VA


PRIVATE E.R. CADMUS TO HELP REPAIR FRANCE

Private Edward R. Cadmus, Watervliet arsenal, New York, a mechanic who signed for repair work in France in a letter to his sister-in-law, Mrs. J.K. Cadwallader of McClusky, says he enlisted to help avenge the wrongs against Belgium and the insults by the Germans against the American people.

Enlisted in Detroit.
He enlisted in Detroit, Mich. From there he went to Columbus Barracks, Ohio and later to Camp Hancock, GA, where the temperature was similar to recent Jersey County temperature, 110 in the shade. He was made cook for a while and, as he puts it, “I was always sure of his feed.” One old Negro said it was so hot there that the hens were known to lay hardboiled eggs and frogs lived to be eight years old before learning to swim water was so scarce.

Go Thru Seven States.
In going to his present location he passed through seven states including the city which his parents used to live before they were married. The Watervliet arsenal was used during the civil war and is a beautiful spot, he says. The city is about 30,000 population, just across the Hudson from Troy, NY. All the men with him are enlisted men and nearly all mechanics signed up for repair work in France. He is routed out of bed each morning at 6am; breakfast 7:30; sick call 7am; drill 8am to 10:30am; inspection; dinner 12; drill (cont. page 7) [remainer of article is missing]


1918

FIRST KANE BOY TO ENLIST IS WOUNDED

Richard BROWN, son of Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Brown of Kane, was injured in the fighting in France. He was a Marine, having enlisted last April while he was still a member of the senior class of the Jersey Township high school. He went overseas with the fighting Sixth regiment of Marines last October. His parents received a letter from him recently in which he said he had just completed 18 days fighting at the front. He was the first boy from Kane to enter the service.


NEWS FROM BOYS AT THE FRONT 1918

Mrs. Marie Forbes is in receipt of a card from her youngest son, Leslie saying, “Arrived safely overseas.” He had been in training at Camp Pike.

John Proffer, one of the Jersey county drafted men, who is stationed at Camp Taylor, is spending a few days’ furlough with his wife and parents.

Mr. and Mrs. John Tonkinson had a nice letter from their youngest son, Tet,? who is with Pershing’s army and he is fine and contented. Their eldest son, Douglas Tonkinson, is still in the U. S. Army and was also well at the time of writing.

Frank Dunlope has written his parents, Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Dunlope, Sr., telling he has been promoted to Sergeant. He is at Camp Pike. “Yank” as he was often called, suffered broken arches from severe training and he has not had to do much of that kind of work since breaking his arches. He is fine and dandy,


MISC. MILITARY NOTES

Men over 31 years of age and boys less than 21 will not go to war soon, as the senate defeated draft limits of 20-40 years. A new plan was accepted basing the draft quotas on the number of me in class one instead of upon state populations. Senator New’s suggestion to make military training of youths between 20 and 21 compulsory was defeated. Laborers of the shipyards say they will not work if they are denied their beer and whisky!! Troops cannot have booze, but the laborers are pressuring the government. It looks like a case of labor bluffing Uncle Sam. Drawing numbers to determine the order in which youths of the 1918 class enter service occurred Thursday. The drawing affected 744,500 young men who registered for service June 5th. The first number drawn was 246 and the last 225. Orders have been issued sending a regiment of U.S. Troops to Italy.


1918

ASHAMED OF HIS NAME

Philip A.M. KEISER of near Kemper found his name unbearable after the bad reputation the German Kaiser is making for himself that he presented himself at the courthouse in Jerseyville Saturday and filed suit in the county court to have his name changed to Philip August Martin, which is now his first three given names. J.A. Smith of Kemper, postmaster, accompanied Mr. Keiser to Jerseyville to have the latter’s name changed.


Grafton Marine Has Decoration of Legion of Honor. Fayette Pivoda of the U. S. Marine Corps, who was wounded in the fighting in France, is home visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Pivoda of Grafton, and is wearing the decoration of the Legion of Honor, the highest military honor France can bestow on a soldier. The Marines for their brilliant, courageous and sacrificial work at Chateau Thierry and BelleauWood, where they turned the tide of battle for the Allies, are recognized as the saviours of France and are well deserving of highest honors. Merely to have been with the Marines in France is to be a hero. At the expiration of his furlough, Pivoda returns to Brooklyn, N. Y., where he will be kept a couple of months before being discharged.


WANTED – Red Cross Workers (1918)

Also donations of discarded wool blankets, preferably white, and wool or mixed wool underwear, and money. These are to be used in the making of layettes for war refugees. Donations may be sent to Mrs. J. R. Fulkerson and Mrs. H. R. Gledhill, and all who are interested in the work may report to them. The need for these layettes is most urgent and any Jerseyville or Jersey County ladies who have a moment’s spare time can put it to charitable and necessary use by assisting with this sewing. One five dollar donation has already been received by the ladies from the Married Woman’s Club and a little Jerseyville girl gave a dollar of her Christmas money to the cause. Donations, however small, will be most gratefully received as will gifts of materials. Help clothe the babies whose eyes first behold the sad spectacle of a world at war, with no comforts, no clothing, and insufficient food.

1919

Corporal Ross Home From France (Jersey County Democrat, January 23, 1919). Corporal Harry Ross, son of Mrs. Sanford Ross of this city, arrived home Sunday, having received his honorable discharge after serving overseas. Corporal Ross left Jerseyville with a contingent that went to Camp Gordon, Ga., May 27th, and arrived on the other side of the Atlantic early in August. He was in the battle of the Argonne, entering the fight on the 26th of September, and serving until the middle of October. Some of the heaviest fighting in which the American forces participated was that in the Argonne forest where they fought against great odds, and it was in this drive that Corporal Ross took part. He was for fourteen consecutive days in the front lines, went over the top a number of times, and was constantly under fire. He escaped wounds, but became ill from exposure and hardship, so was sent to a hospital and returned home with a hospital unit. He served overseas with Co. I, 110th Infantry. Corporal Ross landed at Newport News, Va., December 30th, from the Eeolus. He was sent to Camp Grant, Rockford, Ill., the demobilization camp for Illinois Troops, and came from there home.


ANNOUNCE MARRIAGE JUNE 1 – GROOM IN ARMY

Mr. and Mrs. Leon C. HART, both of Jerseyville, have announced their marriage which took place June 1, 1919, at Norfolk, VA. The bride, who was Miss Ida QUEEN before her marriage, was one of Jersey County’s successful school teachers. She was employed to teach in the Alton grade school for the present term, but has given up her position there for one that is permanent. The groom is the son of A.C. Hart of Chesterfield, Ill., and is an officer in the U.S. Army stationed at Greenville, S.C. The young couple had been sweethearts since childhood and their friends will not be surprised to hear of their marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Hart are now living at Greenville, where he is training men for overseas duty. Mrs. Hart expects to teach in Greenville.


LIEUT. C. F. NITSCHKE. Home To Help His Father With His Business After Four Years Service In The U.S. Army (1919)

     On August 20, 1915, Paul Nitschke, the local butcher and live stock dealer accompanied his oldest son, Charles Frank Nitschke, to St. Louis, where the young man passed the examinations for admission into the U.S. Cavalry as a private. The lad was a big husky boy, yet in his nineteenth year. He was assigned to the 12th Cavalry. The term of enlistment was four years active, three on reserve—seven years.
     Young Nitschke stood the tests of the raw recruit and was soon a “regular”. Being a meat cutter by trade he was soon assigned to duty in the “kitchen” of his company, and his superiors decided to make him a cook, this being about a year after his enlistment, and he was sent to the government school for cooks and bakers at Ft. Riley, Kansas, from which he graduated in May, 1916, making the highest grades in his class. Then he rejoined his regiment which was on the Mexican border, and remained there until the outbreak of the world war, when he received orders to report at the Cooks and Bakers School at Camp Taylor, Ky., and was promoted to the rank of Sergeant, First Class, arriving at Camp Taylor in August he was assigned as an instructor at the school, staying there until December, 1917, when he was transferred to Camp Shelby, Miss.
     As a result of his capable work as an instructor there he was in May, 1918, promoted to the rank of Q. M. Sergeant, Senior Grade, the highest rank possible without being commissioned. He continued his efficient work and in July, 1918, he was discharged from service and promoted from the ranks to a second lieutenancy, which rank he held until he asked for his discharge from service a couple of weeks ago.
     In addition to the high honors he obtained through meritorious work, he wears an expert rifleman’s badge which he won while a private in the 12th Cavalary on July 4, 1917, scoring 257 hits out of a possible 300; he also wears the badge of an expert pistol shot, which he won in 1916 by placing 22 shots out of 30 in a target, with a Colt’s automatic. He also wears the Mexican campaign service badge and the three silver service stripes.
     The foregoing account is a true one and shows the great possibilities for the young man in America who has the proper spirit and determination to succeed, which he has in no other country in the world. Here is a young man 23 years of age, with a parochial and public school education, who has in less than four years risen from the ranks in the U.S. army to a commissioned officer, through merit. From the privates pay of $30 per month to a second lieutenancy at $141.67 per month. This is the kind of boys that makes us proud to be an American and to live in Little Jersey.

Here’s to your warrior bold,
(He) wears the Silver, not the Gold;
(He) did not cross the briny deep,
But wasn’t because he had cold feet.

Undated Articles

CORPORAL ROBERT NEIL CROW was severely wounded in action on June 7. His mother, Mrs. Charlotte Crow, received a telegram with this unwelcome news yesterday morning. Although it happened almost three weeks ago, no further information is as yet available. Corporal Crow was in the 97th Company, 6th Regiment, U. S. Marines, and was no doubt in the aggressive fighting that began about the first of this month, and in which the Marines have taken an heroic part. Neil’s friends are earnestly hoping and waiting.


JOHN J. WELSH, PIASA, PROUD TO BE IN ARMY

The following two letters were written b y Pvt. John J. Walsh, Battery A., 326 F.A., American E. F., France, to his brother Richard and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Welsh of Piasa township.

“Ireland and Scotland have the finest scenery of any place I ever saw. On my way over here I never got sick at all and never felt better. We have a fine place to sleep and all we want to eat. We have fine weather now. Some places they are just setting out cabbages for the second crop.
“We are 18 miles south of Bordeaux, in southern France. It is all sand here. The only thing I can’t get straightened out is the French money and I don’t think I ever will learn to count it.

Nine Jersey Boys There.
Lynn Sloan is here in the same camp with me but I haven’t seen him since we landed. There are nine of the Jersey county boys still together that came with me. When you write be sure to tell me who was elected.
“How are my horses? Tell sister to take good care of them for I will be back in the spring if not before, so why should anyone worry?”

A second letter written to his parents, Oct. 3, follows:

“I am just fine and having one grand time. I hope all wre well at home.

Trip Wonderful.
“I surely had a wonderful trip since I left West Point, Ky., and landed in sunny France. It is well worth seeing, but I wouldn’t give little Jersey county for any I saw. There is no place like home, sweet home.
“The folks at home don’t know what a beautiful world this is, and some of them around home never will, for $1 looks too good to them. Money wouldn’t buy what I have seen. I sure hope to see more of it and finish up the Hungs; then I’ll be bound for home.

Horses Are Big.
“Tell Dick I wish he were here to see the fine horses we have. They have some big ones here — one is as big as three back there. They beat anything in the East St. Louis stock yards.
“I can’t write much, you know, but I will sure have something to talk abot when I get back, and never will get it all told.
“I am proud I am able to be in the army, and I never would have gotten to see what I have if I were not in the army.
“Don’t worry; I am fine, and it won’t be long before we will be able to get together again.”

Pvt. John J. Welsh, Bat. A., 326 F.A., A.E.F. France


“Old Glory”

“Old Glory” on the village flag pole was lowered to half-mast Saturday morning when the telegram came announcing the death of Chas. W. Ewin which occurred October 7, either on the way over or soon after his arrival in Liverpool, Eng. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Ewin of Piasa, and the only brother of Ralph E. Ewin of this place. He was well known here where he had many friends, having spent several years, prior to his enlistment on his farm just south of town. He and Harley Moran of this place enlisted in the Marine corps last December, going to Paris Island, S. C. Wualifying as an expert marksman, Charlie, as he was better known, was transferred to Miami, Fla., in company with Howard Warner of Medora. The parents expect to soon receive the body for burial. A more detailed account will probably appear later.


Gregory Ripley, the third son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Rippley, who has been in training since October 1st at Camp Donaphin, departed Monday for camp after spending a seven day furlough with home folks. Gregory makes an excellent looking soldier and likes his work fine. He belongs to 128th company, Missouri Artillery. He has been machine gun instructor at Camp Donaphin for some time. He says according to instructions his company will soon be leaving for “somewhere in France.”


Emanuel Cline. Mr. Emanuel Cline returned home Sunday evening from Camp Custer, Mich., where he was called by the illness of his son, Emanuel LeRoy Cline, who died Saturday morning at 2:30 a.m. of pneumonia and influenza. Mr. Cline reached his son’s bedside in time to care for him in his last hours and Roy, as he was better known, was enabled to converse a little in spite of his extreme suffering. He had been in Camp only since September 5th. The body arrived here Monday evening with military escort. An obituary will be sent in next week.


GRAFTON

FRED AMBURG in France. Mr. and Mrs. J.M. Amburg received a card stating that their only son Fred had arrived safely overseas. Fred was one of Grafton’s most popular young men and was for many months before his departure employed as timekeeper at the Illinois Powder Co. He is a sergeant.

Soldiers Visit Home Folks. VIRGIL SCHLANSKER returned to Camp Taylor after spending a few days’ furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Schlansker. Virgil was among the first young men to leave Jersey county for Camp Taylor and expects to leave for France soon.

Arrives Safe Overseas. Miss BIRDIE LAMARSH of Grafton received a card stating that her friend, LAWRENCE ALLEN has arrived safely in France. Lawrence is the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Otto Allen, prosperous Jersey county farmers.


CALL RECEIVED FOR 117 YOUNG MEN TO GO TO CAMP. CLASS ONE PRACTICALLY EXHAUSTED BY LATEST DEMAND. LEAVE BETWEEN SEPTEMBER 3 AND 6.

Next Call Will Be Satisfied by Young Men Who Registered Saturday, and Those to Register Next Month.
A call was received Monday by the Jersey county Exemption Board for 92 young men from Little Jersey to be sent to Camp Custer, Mich., between Sept. 3rd and 6th, 20 are to be sent to Camp Forest, GA, and five limited service men will go to Camp Grant, Rockford, IL. This practically exhausts the supply of class one registrants and the next contingent must be made up of young men registered Saturday.

Sent Over Rapidly.
Troops are being trained as rapidly as possible at the various cantonment camps throughout the United States and as fast as they are sent overseas others must be called into training. Uncle Sam is making an effort to send as many troops across as possible before cold weather sets in. The number of men sent overseas during the winter will not be as large as at the present time or during the coming spring and summer months.The following young men will leave for camp as the next contingent from Jersey county: Names of Young Men.

22 Edward A. Stratton; 61 Andrew S. Tannehill, Meppen; 74 James L. Long, Jr;103 Earl Patton, Grafton; 218 Marion H. Taylor, Dow; 278 Roscoe C. Baxter, Grafton; 323 Gustave E. Weber, Delhi; 362 John F. Hooper; 365 Frank K. Gerson, Dow; 407 James C. Antrobus; 441 John E. Winters; 448 Edw. M. McKernan, Kemper; 479 Frank M. Madden, Kemper; 556 Clinton C. Clark; 592 Fred B. Reed; 602 Wm. Fessler, Dow; 603 John C. Springman, Fieldon; 612 Frank W. Brockman; 615 Wm. O. Loy, Kane; 624 Amos G. Cochran; 627 Lester C. Lyon, Kemper; 629 James D. Moore; 634 Fred J. Wieneke, Otterville; 645 Walter H. Maxeiner, Delhi; 646 August Gerson, Fieldon; 657 Moab Value, Fieldon; 667 Walter Bates, Dow; 679 Lee R. Bryant, Fieldon; 680 Leslie C. Gunterman, Fieldon; 681 Fred W. Engel, Dow; 682 Geo. H. Frost; 683 John L. Goetten; 684 John H. Pille; 703 James D. Weaver, Fieldon; 704 Wm. M. Snow, Fieldon; 706 Roy W. Walters, Rockbridge; 710 Frank Krueger, Fieldon; 712 Walter R. Fessler, Dow; 713 Rupert R. Rintoul, Godfrey; 716 Daniel Tuohy; 717 Jos. B. Ritchey, Fieldon; 734 Arthur H. Barnett, Delhi; 735 Austin L. Belt; 742 Peter R. Young, Kane; 743 Thomas E. Herring, Eldred; 746 Fred W. Kleffner; 750 John N. Powers; 763 Henry M. McCoy, Grafton; 788 Chas. T. Gerson, Fieldon; 789 Wm. J. Hooper, Grafton; 806 Elmer N. Campion; 813 Alfred Orban, Delhi; 827 Clarice E. Felter; 834 Harry L. Jokers, Dow; 840 Wm. M. Moore; 843 Louis A Freand; 848 Peter E. Whalen, Grafton; 854 Harry E. Burns; 863 Larry L. Ontis, Fieldon; 886 Leslie J. Lillis, Medora; 891 Fred E. Lanham; 895 Donald C. Meacham, Brighton; 909 Peter J. Powers; 910 Wm. G. Worthy; 911 Fred H. Wheaton, Fieldon; 918 Chas. H. Overmeyer; 928 Roy Rowden, Jefferson City, MO; 37 Preston Bligh, Jerseyville; 38 Lee R. Young, Kane; 39 Hugh A Roberts, Jerseyville; 40 John B. O’Donnell, Jerseyville; 41 Fred Widman, Dow; 42 Frank D. Brown, Eldred; 43 Clarence Keehner, Jerseyville; 44 James P. Jennings, Delhi; 45 Theodore J. Boehler, Delhi; 46 Amil A. Darr, Jerseyville; 47 Geo. W. Barnett, Delhi; 48 Clarence N. Johnson, Dow; 49 Lawrence F. Finkes, Dow; 50 Isaac F. McCollister, Jerseyville; 51 Robert Frazier, McClusky; 52 Walter G. Krueger, Fieldon; 53 Thomas E. Tuohy, Jerseyville; 54 Lloyd Collenberger, Jerseyville; 55 Wm. E. Miller, Fieldon; 56 Perry E. Sunderland, Jerseyville; 57 Charles W. Day, Jerseyville; 58 Charles Rothe, Delhi; 59 D.H. McDow, Grafton; 60 Len H. Schoeberle, Brighton; 61 Charles Boushka, Kane; 62 Everett Parsell, Jerseyville; 63 Walter Dependahl, Delhi; 64 Theodore L. Groppel, Jerseyville; 65 Paul L. Feyerabend, Jerseyville; 66 Wm. J. Ritchey, Kane; 67 Truman Liles, Jerseyville; 68 Geo. Albert Hardy, Jerseyville; 69 Leslie C. Carpunky, Grafton; 70 Chester Darr, Jerseyville; 71 James G. Wilton, Kemper; 72 Louis T. Walters, Rockbridge; 73 Louis K. Erb, Dow; 74 Ralph V. Large, Brighton; 75 Joseph R. Lillis, Medora; 76 Herbert F. Watson, Jerseyville; 77 Wm. Earl Hughes, Jerseyville; 78 Fred E. Bridges, Jerseyville; 79 Pearl I. Jones, Jerseyville; 80 Raymond E. Cory, Grafton; 81 Hugh Ware Cross, Jerseyville; 82 Willie Rister, Elsah.


ANOTHER JERSEYVILLE BOY HAS “GONE ACROSS.” Another Jerseyville boy has “gone across” to help make the World safe for Democracy. LOUIS WOCK of this community will be “over there” before this edition has gone to press. The parents have just received a letter from their daughter, Mrs. H.P. WARTMAN, whose home is now in Philadelphia, that she has been to Camp Mills Long Island, NY to bid her brother God speed. Edward Wock, another son, is now in training at Camp Taylor, KY


CROWDER ISSUES ORDER FOR CLASS ONE SELECTS. All draft registrants in class one, who registered prior to September 12, including the special registration of August 28, have been called into service by Gen. Crowder. All future calls will be taken from class one men between the ages of 19 and 36 years. The call, which was issued October 28, is for 2,860 class one men from Illinois, 2,395 white men go to Camp Wadsworth, the five day period beginning November 11, and for 465 colored men to go to Camp Grant the period beginning November 19. The new call in no way interferes with the call for 14,000 white men who were to have entrained October 21, but were delayed by the epidemic. The latter group will be called to entrain when quarantine is lifted, and will be sent to southern camps. Jersey County board has as yet received no definite instructions.


PRIVATE FLOYD A. MATHEW ARRIVES OVERSEAS. Floyd A. Mathew has safely arrived overseas, according to an announcement received by his mother, Mrs. S.L. Mathew, east of Jerseyville. Floyd enlisted in the quartermaster’s corps December 11, 1917, and was stationed at Fort Sam Houston, TX pervious to going across September 9. He wrote two letters (“somewhere on the ocean”) in which he says “I never felt better or happier, and was never better satisfied in my life.” He went as company clerk.


LAVERNE CHAPPELL ILL IN SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. LaVerne Chappell is seriously ill at Letterman hospital, San Francisco, CA, according to a message received Wednesday morning by his father, Fred Chappell, of Jerseyville. Pvt. Chappell enlisted in the hospital corps last July while in the west filling an engagement with the Western baseball league in which he played at Los Angeles, San Francisco and Salt Lake City.


GRAFTON BOYS ENLIST IN NAVY. Messrs. John Rippley and Lloyd Hayes of Grafton, went to St. Louis last week where they enlisted in the U. S. Navy. Both young men were supposed to go with the next bunch of drafted men from Jersey county.


FIRST JERSEY BOY KILLED IN ACTION. Sergeant Fred Worthy, Company K, 138th Missouri infantry, is the first Jersey county boy to be killed in battle, notification of his death was received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Worthy, four miles east of Jerseyville. Sergeant Worthy volunteered and received his military training at camp Doniphan, OK., and went oversears the early part of last summer. His company was cited for especial bravery during the fighting last August. Sergeant Worthy was killed September 26. Details are lacking at this time. Besides his parents, sergeant Worthy is survived by a cousin, Harold Worthy, in hte same company, three brothers, William at Camp Custer, Francis and earl at home, and five sisters, Elizabeth, Esther, Erma, Eva and Lucille.


CHARLES EWIN, PIASA, DIES IN LIVERPOOL. Sergeant Charles Ewin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ewin near Piasa, died of pneumonia October 7 in a hospital in Liverpool. Sergeant Ewin enlisted December 1917, in the Marine Corps and was on his way to France when he died. On account of his excellence as a sharpshooter, he was made gunner in the aviation section of the Marines. Ralph Ewin, Fidelity, a brother, and Miss Mabel Ewin of Piasa, a sister, and an uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. John Ewin of Jerseyville, survive him, besides his parents.


MARCUS WOOD DIES SUDDENLY IN PANAMA. Marcus Wood, youngest son of Mrs. Jennie Wood of Jerseyville, age 18 years, died in the Canal Zone, according to a message received by Mrs. Wood, particulars are not stated. Marcus volunteered in April, 1917, while in the second year of high school. He was sent to Panama as a musician but was later transferred to the artillery. Three brothers, Scott, Glenn and Max Wood are in France, the latter arriving overseas last week. He leaves behind his three brothers, his mother and one sister, Miss Penelope Woods of Jerseyville.


JOHN WELSH WRITES LETTER FROM FRANCE. John J. Welsh, a Piasa township boy somewhere in France, writes the following letter to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Welsh:

“Just a line to let you know I am still alive and just fine and hope all are the same at home. Just received your letter and one from Stella, Sister Marguerite and Una – the first I got since I left West Point and I sure was more than glad to get them. I done without supper to read them. They came to Camp Mills and then sent to here. I am sending you my pictures, they sure are some pictures. I was sorry to hear Kate lost her baby and hope she is alright. I am sending you a paper that is already made out so if you want to send me anything for Xmas, you can do just as this tells you but I don’t think it is any use to. I sure was glad to hear Jim Catt and Judge Sumner were nominated. Tell Jim I want to be his deputy when I get back, for what it takes to get criminals, Jim and I have it. You can tell him I will be more hard-boiled when I get back than when I left. Well, I am having a fine time and getting fatter here than back home. John J. Welsh


THIRTY-FIVE YOUNG MEN LEAVE FOR CAMP

(cont. from page 1) [first part of article missing] acted for A. Pitt, chairman, who was unable to be present. Mr. Tracey in turn appointed four assistants, one for each eight men, as provided in the regulations, naming Walter Spangle, Homer Whitley, August Baum and Winfield Cornelius. Just before the train left Mr. Case gave the boys the data required by the government including their exemption cards. Each boy was given a “Smileage” book which admits them to the attractions at Liberty theatres.

Next Draft in June
The next draft will not take place until next June, it is said, and the members of the exemption board were released from duty until recalled. Thomas Case of Otterville, one of the members, will take advantage of the order and pay his neighbors a few weeks’ visit. There were no “alternates.” Every one of the young men certified to go must report. Those unable to go with the contingent Tuesday on account of sickness must report later when they are able. Five, it is understood, were reported ill including Frank Christen of Fieldon, who has smallpox; Carl Schmeider, Henry and Joseph Tonsor, who have measles and Orville Breitweiser, who is suffering from an operation on the nose. An effort is being made to have a number of young men who were sent to Camp Taylor Tuesday reclassified in order to avoid seriously handicapping farm work in the county. The young men were compelled to go, however, and await the decision of the district board. The war department instructions say: “Induction of men into military service shall not be stayed by reopening the case by the district board.” This does not mean that the men may not be returned later.


Srgt. Harold Flautt Sends Hun Helmet Home. Mrs. Mary Flautt of Otterville received through the mail last Wednesday a german helmet from her son, Sergeant Harold Flautt, who is in France. The helmet weighs three pounds. It . . . 48 cents to send it across the . . . n. Inside are four leather tabs . . .ted to the metal. These are laced. . . ther and form a protection for . . . head and also provide pockets for . . . ying money and small articles.


Carl J. Giers Dies at Camp Upton L. I. Carl J. Giers, aged 24 years, son of Dr. and Mrs. L. J. Giers of Jerseyville, died Saturday, September 28 at Camp Upton, Long Island, of pneumonia. Dr. Giers received a telegram Saturday noon stating that his son was seriously ill with pneumonia. A message later in the afternoon brought the news of his death. He was . . . but a short time. It is believed th . . . pneumonia was brought on by an attack of influenza from which he was recovering.

Entered Army
Carl J. Giers entered the service of his country on June 15, 1918, going to Rahe automobile school in Kansas City, Mo. He was later sent to Camp Holabird, Md., and from there to Camp Upton. He was a member of water tank train, 302 Company D. The younger brother, Harold, is at Camp Custer, Mich. On account of the camp being under quarantine because of influenza, Harold was unable to come to the funeral. Two other brothers, Louis and Theodore, are living at home. Ralph Giers, a cousin, in service at Columbus, O., arrived Tuesday.

Funeral Here.
Remains were brought to Jerseyville Tuesday afternoon accompanied by a military escort. The funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the M. E. Church, Rev. Paul Stange officiating, assisted by the Rev. Joseph Jenkins. Interment was in Oak Grove mausoleum.


CORPORAL ROBERT NEIL CROW was severely wounded in action on June 7. His mother, Mrs. Charlotte Crow, received a telegram with this unwelcome news yesterday morning. Altho it happened almost three weeks ago, no further information is as yet available. Corporal Crow was in the 97th company, 6th regiment U.S. Marines, and was no doubt in the aggressive fighting that began about the first of this month, and in which the Marines have taken an heroic part. Neil’s friends are earnestly hoping and waiting.


Herman Schnelten

Herman A. Schnelten died last Thursday at Camp Taylor, adding the seventh gold star for Carrollton and vicinity. He was one of the hundreds in the camp who contracted the influenza, which in his case developed into pneumonia and resulted in his death. His age was 28 years. The body was brought to his home, west of town, arriving Sunday morning, accompanied by Corporal Mehrhoff and Joe Schnelten, twin brother of the decedent, who was also at Camp Taylor under training.

The funeral was held at St. John’s church at 9 a.m. Monday, and was conducted by Father D. J. Moroney. Business houses were generally closed during the funeral, the church was crowded and every possible token of respect paid the dead soldier. A large delegation of Knights of Columbus from Jerseyville came to attend the funeral. A band led the procession to St. John’s cemetery. The bearers were Dr. J. J. Frostmann , Thos. H. Carmody, Frank Sethaler , Frank Kaiser, Peter Steinacher and John Pranger.

Herman A. Schnelten was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Schnelten, and he and his twin brother Joe were born at the Schnelten farm, west of town, in August 1890. His parents died some years ago, but the children remained on the farm, and Herman was called from the farm last June to enter the service of the country. He went first to the Rag_ auto school in Kansas City and later to Camp Taylor, Louisville, Ky. where he was assigned to Battery B. 20th Battalion, F. A. R. D.

Herman Schnelten was one of the splendid young men of the community. In the funeral discourse Father Moroney paid him the tribute of being the most devoutly religious young men in St. John’s church, and he was beloved and admired by all for his fine character. There is sincere sorrow on every hand because of his death, and that he died in the service of his country adds a wreath of undying glory to his memory.


U. S. DEAD IN EARNEST ABOUT SAVING WHEAT FOR SOLDIER BOYS. GROCERY STORES MUST SELL SUBSTITUTES WITH WHITE FLOUR BE PATRIOTIC; EAT “LIBERTY BREAD.” Every Day is a Food-Saving Day – Bakers Must Mix Corn With Wheat Flour For Baking Bread

     The fact that the United States is at war and that Uncle Sam is dead in earnest about decreasing the consumption of white flour was impressed strongly on the minds of Jersey county housewives Monday when they received their day’s supply of groceries.
     In accordance with the order of U. S. Food Administrator Hoover grocery stores sold a pound of substitute flour for every pound of white flour sent to customers. These substitutes consisted of the products of rice, barley, buckwheat, corn, and oats.

Save Million Bushels
     One million and a half bushels of wheat will be saved each month for use of the soldiers in France by this ruling says Mr. Hoover.
     The flour substitutes may be mixed with the white flour or used separately.
     Jerseyville bakers are now making bread of a mixture of white flour and substitutes. k Five percent of substitutes must be used on the start and the proportion increased to 20 percent by February 24. Such bread and biscuits are known as “Liberty Bread” and every housewife is urged to buy only this kind. Graham and whole wheat bread is included as they contain 25 per cent more of the wheat flour than does white flour.
     Dealers cannot sell wheat flour substitutes for any higher price than will allow them profits larger than before the war.
     Wheat millers must make a 196 pound sack of flour from 264 pounds of wheat.

Save Food Every Day
     Every day in the week is a food saving day by order of the United States Food Administration.
     Mondays and Wednesdays are wheatless days, Tuesday is a meatless day, Tuesdays and Saturdays are porkless days, have one wheatless meal each day and one meatless meal each day. Eat fruit, vegetables and potatoes abundantly and save sugar and fats, including soap.


SEND 17 SELECTED MEN TO CAMP McCLELLAN. Jersey county exemption board received a call for 17 general service men to go to Camp McClellan, Anniston, Ala., between October 12 and 25. The men are:

Francis O’Donnell, Grafton; Charles Boushka, English Twp.; Arthur F. Watson, Fidelity; Walter Dependahl, Delhi; George Kirchner, Otter Creek Twp.; Theodore J. Boehler, Delhi; Edward McKernan, Kemper; Chester Darr, Dow; Thomas Earl Touhy, Jerseyville; Ralph V. Large, Brighton; William Earl Miller, Jerseyville; Joseph R. Lillis, Kemper; Charles Rothe, Piasa; Pearl Iseam Jones, Jerseyville; Leonard H. Schroeberle, Brighton; Raymond E. Cory, Grafton; William Rister, Dow

Ralph Gardner left Tuesday with five other boys from Green County for the Bradley Polytecnical School at Peoria, to take up special military training.

George Klemme, Golden Eagle, and Harry E. Holmes, Kampsville, were reported wounded in a recent casualty list.

Lee Toll, a former Calhoun boy was killed in battle Sept. 29.


FRIENDS PAY TRIBUTE TO THE MEMORY OF SERGT. CHAS. EWIN. Body brought from England. Funeral in Jerseyville Sunday. Died in Liverpool, Oct. 7. Ill of pneumonia – Born Near Jerseyville 1892 – Popular in Piasa. Enlisted with Marines in Dec, 1917

     Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon over the body of Sergeant Charles Wm. Ewin, who died for his country October 7, in Liverpool, England.
     A large number of Sergeant Ewin’s friends attended the services, which were held in the Methodist church at 1:30 Sunday. The body was escorted from the Fales-Wiseman undertaking rooms to the church by the members of Shipman and Jerseyville lodges, A. F. & A. M. The Rev Frank D. Hopkins, Oak Park, Il., assisted by Rev. F. O. Wilson and Chaplin W. T. Ruyle of Jerseyville, paid a fitting tribute to the memory of the deceased. The body, which was sent from England immediately, arrived Saturday at the home of the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ewin, near Piasa, and was brought to Jerseyville for burial at Oak Grove Cemetery. The A. F. & A. M. lodges had charge of the service conducted by Past Master Paul M. Hamilton at the grave.

Born In Jerseyville
     Charles W. Ewin was born December 16, 1892, south of Jerseyville, where he spent the early years of his life and attended school.
     In 1910 he moved to the farm in Piasa with his parents. When he reached his majority, he farmed the home place two years and then moved back to Jersey county, where he lived until his sale in October, 1917. He had with true patriotic spirit determined to enter his country’s service.
     He enlisted in December, 1917, with the first marine aviation force, squadron D., H. S. M. C. He secured his preliminary training at Paris Island, S. C. and was transferred to Miami, Fla., where on account of his expert marksmanship, he was a machine gun instructor. Though he had an opportunity to remain in America, he chose to serve his country on the battlefield. Sergeant Ewin sailed in September, arriving overseas Oct. 3. Nine days later his family received notice of his death at the Red Cross hospital in Liverpool.

Popular in Piasa
     He was well known in Jerseyville, and was one of the most popular young men in his community. He was a member of Piasa camp, M. W. of A. and an active member of the Shipman Lodge, A. F. & A. M. and received the 32nd degree in Masonry at Miami, Fla.
     Besides his parents, the deceased leaves a sister, Miss Mabel Ewin, a brother, R. E. Ewin, his fiancee, Miss Anita Chism, of Medora, and an Uncle, John Ewin of Jerseyville.


WOUNDED IN FRANCE HEROES RETURN HOME. Neil Crow and Isham Linder arrived in Carrollton last Saturday, the first Green county boys to return from France. Both were wounded in the battle of Chateau Thierry. Crow and Linder were with the sixsth regiment of marines, cited for bravery in holding back the Germans. Crow was wounded in both legs, but recovered sufficiently to be able to return to his company before the armistice was signed. He was again woulded in both legs and was sent immediately to the United States, arriving at Norfolk December 5. Linder was woulded in the shoulder and was severly gassed. He will report at Brooklyn within 30 days to be discharged.


HOME ON FURLOUGH. George King, kwho has been in the U. S. navy on board the merchant ship, “Pensicola” having made three trips overseaas, arrivced in Kane Saturday to spend a ten-day furlough [remainder of article missing]


THIRTY-FIVE YOUNG MEN LEAVE FOR CAMP TAYLOR ON TUESDAY. LITTLE JERSEY FURNISHES LAST OF FIRST DRAFT ARMY QUOTA. BOYS GIVEN FAREWELL RECEPTION. Many Honor Boys At Court House, Where Talks Are Made to Young Men. Twenty-Nine of Them are Farmers.

Thirty-five young men form Jersey county, prospective United States soldiers, 29 of whom were farmer boys whose departure was delayed from last fall because their presence was needed on the farms of Little Jersey, left for Camp Taylor, Ky., at 5:55 o’clock Tuesday evening over the Chicago & Alton. They arrived at their destingation at 7:25 Wednesday morning.

Completes County Quota
     This completes Jersey county’s quota of the first draft army. In all, 111 young men have been sent to Louisville from Little Jersey, whose quota was 122. The county was given credit for 11 men who enlisted. There were 76 at Camp Taylor before the last ones arrived. The 111 men were secured from 293 examined.

Those Who Were Called
     The following young men are included in Little Jersey’s last quota of the first draft:
Joseph Finkes, Dow, Farmer; Alva H. Moore, Jerseyville, farmer; William E. Schafer, Jerseyville, farmer; Louis Wock, Jerseyville, farmer; Mathew Walsh, Dow, farmer; Guy R. Hills, Abingdon, farmer; August Baum, Fieldon, teacher; Homer E. Whitley, Jerseyville, baker; Orville Y. Breitweiser, Jerseyville, farmer; Robert Bland, Dow, farmer; John J. Wash, Godfrey, farmer; Carl J. Schmeider, Jerseyville, farmer; Monroe M. Elliott, Kemper, farmer; Winfield H. Cornelius, Dow, farmer; Joseph Tonsor, Jerseyville, farmer; Joseph F. Gibbons, Delhi, farmer; Francis B. Tracy, Jerseyville, farmer; Lester Dunham, Fieldon, farmer; Chester N. Heiderschied, Fieldon, farmer; John F. Kallal, Jerseyville, farmer; John Sherman, Grafton, farmer; Walter J. Spangle, Jerseyville, poultry buyer; Henry A. Tonsor, Jerseyville farmer; Herbert Lee ross, Jerseyville, farmer; Anthony Huber, Brighton, farmer; Leon S. McKabney, Jerseyville, farmer; William Henry Huff, Medora, farmer; Henry John Butt, Grafton, farmer; John M. Prof (List Not Complete)


CABLEGRAM FROM SON IS RECEIVED AT MIDNIGHT
     Just as the family clock at the G. Y Campbell residence northeast of Jerseyville was announcing midnight Friday, May 1, the telephone bell rang and the night operator read a message to Mrs. Campbell from her son Virgil Campbell, who is in the services of Uncle Sam “over there.”
     Mrs. Campbell had given instructions to the telegraph operator to send her any messages from Virgil that might arrive, regardless of the hours received.
     The following simple message was Virgil’s May basket to his mother, father and sisters: “still in England. Well and happy.” The message was sent from London, Eng., which indicates that Virgil is visiting in the world’s largest city and might have been the guest of the British king and queen, who entertained some United States troops that day.
     G. Leslie Dougherty, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Dougherty, east of Jerseyville, who is with Virgil, also signed the telegram, which took less than a day to cross the ocean and reach its destination.


THREE MORE BOYS LEAVE FOR CAMP ON FRIDAY

Leroy Moses, Fred Meyer and John Taylor, will leave Friday for Camp Thomas, Newport, Ky., to train for service “over there.” Forty three others will go to camp, to become part of the great national army, later this month, it is reported, and this will take a great majority of those in class one, excepting farmers, who have been temporarily exempted from military service.

Register on June 4
     On June 4, all young men who have become 21 years of age since June 5, 1917 will be required to register for military service, according to an order received from Washington.
     Word received by the exemption board states that the 23 who left for Camp Dix, J. J. arrived there safely and have been assigned to Battery C 308th Field Artillery. They arrived in camp safely on May 1.
     Rumors were afloat in Jerseyville this week that a free-for-all fight occurred on the way to camp between boys form Jersey and Greene counties and that the car had been sidetracked.


SEND 17 SELECTED MEN TO CAMP McCLELLAN

Jersey county exemption board received a call for 17 general service men to go to Camp McClellan, Anniston, Al., between October 12 and 25. The men selected are: Francis O’Donnell, Grafton; Arthur F. Watson, Fidelity; George Kirchner, Otter Creek Twp.; Edward McKernan, Kemper; Thomas Earl Touhy, Jerseyville; William Earl Miller, Jerseyville; Charles Rothe, Piasa; Leonard H. Schroeberle, Brighton; Charles Boushka, English Twp.; Walter Dependalhl, Delhi; Theodore J. Boehler, Delhi; Chester Darr, Dow; Ralph V. Large, Brighton; Joseph R. Lillis, Kemkper; Pearl Iseam Jones, Jerseyville; Raymond E. Cory, Grafton; William Rister, Dow. All the men of class one who registered before September 12, 1918, have now been called.


DRAFT BOARD SENDS MEN FOR TRAINING
     The local exemption board received Saturday a call for six men to go to —– Polytechnic institute, Peoria, for special training as auto mechanics, carpenters, electricians, gunsmiths, instrument repairmen and lens grinders. The men selected will have an exceptional opportunity. Upon completion of the course at the institute, they will be assigned for duty wherever needed.
     These men, who left Tuesday morning are: Charles Edward Lock, Jr., Dow; ???oyd Collenberger, Jerseyville; William Stanley Miller, Jerseyville; George Albert Hardy, Jerseyville; William Earl Hughes, Jerseyville; Hugh Ware Cross, Jerseyville; Thomas Earl Tuohy was alternate.
     Ralph Gardiner left Tuesday with five other boys from Greene county for the Bradly Polytechnic School at Peoria, go to take up special military training.


The county RED CROSS unit has appointed a committee with Mrs. J. J. Wiseman as chairman to gather platinum and other metals necessary for the war. The government has sent out a call for Platinum, tin foil, lead foil, collapsible tubes, pewter articles, gold and silver, solid or plated. Every scrap of metal is valuable today and nothing is to battered or broken to be acceptable. Donations left at the war headquarters will be sold to the government for the benefit of the RED CROSS.


CELEBRATES END OF WAR

The citizens of Grafton were awakened at an early hour Monday morning by the blowing of whistles and the ringing of bells announcing the end of the war. The festivities continued all through the day. Business was suspended and employees in the plants were given a holiday. IN the evening at 7 o’clock a parade took place and the streets were filled with a surging mass of people. To the rope that the service flag hangs on a dummy, imitating the Kaiser, was suspended. After the parade a bonfire was built and the cheering crowd watched the Kaiser burn. Early in the morning a subscription was taken up, which amounted to over 100 dollars. Mason Calloway and John Tonkerson went to Alton where they purchased fireworks, balloons, horns, bells, hats and flags which they distributed among the crowd. The celebration lasted until nearly midnight. Mayors J. W. Newland made a speech in behalf of the National War Work Fund Campaign.


Clippings from Marty Crull.

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