Jersey County ILGenWeb, copyright Judy Griffin 2002, 2003. In keeping with our policy of providing free information on the Internet, data and images may be used by non-commercial entities, as long as this message remains on all copied material. These electronic pages cannot be reproduced in any format for profit or for other presentation without express permission by the contributor(s).

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page

Biographies in the
Atlas Map of Jersey County, Illinoisby Andreas, Lyter & Co., Davenport, IA, 1872

Judge Caleb NOBLE is a native of Adams county, Mississippi, and was born July 28, 1817. He was the ninth of a family of eleven children of Henry and Mary Noble, and was of English descent — Mrs. Noble of German extraction; her maiden name was Mary Swayze; she was borne in the state of New Jersey, and when quite young, her parents moved to Mississippi. Mr. Noble was a native of Maryland, and it was in the state of his adoption that he became acquainted with and afterwards married Miss Swayze. He there engaged in agricultural pursuits, which he followed for many years; and it was in Mississippi that their children were born. In 1824, Mrs. Noble died at their residence. Mr. Noble was afterwards married to Mrs. Curry, by whom he had one child; and wishing to emigrate to a more northern climate, he started, with his family, for Illinois, and landed at Grafton on the 3d of April, 1833. He immediately after settled on the farm which he had previously purchased, situated about three-quarters of a mile northwest of Otterville, there resuming his former occupation. He died at his residence in July, 1852, beloved by a large circle of friends. He was a man of inflexible honesty and integrity. Mrs. Noble’s death occurred a few years previous to her husband’s. Judge Noble, when a boy, attended the schools of his native state, gaining a good, practical education, and we now find him to be reasonably conversant with the topics of the day. When not attending school, he assisted his father in carrying on the farm. At the age of twenty-three he was married to Miss S. Electa Gillham, daughter of Ezekiel Gillham, who was formerly from South Carolina. They had a family of five children, all of whom died in infancy. Soon after his marriage, Mr. Noble moved on the farm where he has since resided. Agricultural pursuits and stock growing have claimed the greater portion of his attention during life. He came to Illinois but by perseverance andeconomy, has acquired a handsome landed estate. In 1844 his taxableproperty, real and personal, amounted only to three hundred and seventy dollars. He now owns over eight hundred acres of the good land of Jersey county, and, besides that, has nine hundred and sixty acres in Gage county, Nebraska. We mention these things simply to show what Mr. Noble has accomplished. He has demonstrated the fact that industry is the sure road to wealth. While a single man, in 1838, he became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. On the first of October, 1851, Mrs. Noble died, and Mr. N. was afterwards married to Susannah L. Buckles, daughter of John and Nancy Buckles, of this county, the marriage occurring in September, 1851. By her he had one son, who is yet living. Mrs. Nobles died in February, 1854, and on the 8th day of August, 1858, Judge Noble was married to Miss Ruth Cadwalader, daughter of John Cadwalader, of Jersey county. Mr. Noble and wife have had six children, one of whom is deceased. Mrs. Noble is also a member of the Methodist Church. In early life Mr. N. became a member of the whig party. He cast his first vote for General Harrison in 1840. He continued to vote with that party until its disorganization, after which he joined the ranks of the democracy. In the fall of 1869 he was elected associate judge of Jersey county. Judge Noble never was a political aspirant, but became a candidate simply to accede to the earnest request of his fellow-citizens. He is a gentleman of a generous and hospitable nature, and is highly respected.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


William NOBLE, Esq., the youngest child of Henry and Nancy A. Noble, was born in Adams county, Mississippi, December 11th, 1857. Henry Noble was a native of Maryland, and, while a single man, went to the state of Mississippi, where he resided for several years, engaged in agricultural pursuits. After disposing of his property there, he removed with his family to Illinois, landing at Grafton in April, 1833, and immediately after settled on some land near where the village of Otterville now stands. He there made a farm — the one on which his son William now resides. Mrs. Noble’s maiden name was Nancy A. Dougharty, and she was born and raised near Charleston, South Carolina. She died at their residence on the 23d of April, 1850. Mr. Noble survived his wife until August, 1852, having reached the advanced age of eighty-two years. The subject of this notice came to the present limits of Jersey county with his parents at the date above stated, and obtained his education principally in the commonschools of Jersey county, working on his father’s farm during the summer months, and attending school in the winter. When about twenty-one years of age, he was married to Miss Thirza Chapple, the marriage occurring on the 4th of March, 1849. His wife was the daughter of Bartholomew and Grace Chapple, who were formerly from Devonshire, England, where Mrs. Noble was born, October 21st, 1828. Her parents emigrated to the United States in 1833, and made their first permanent settlement in this county, locating near Newbern. Mr. and Mrs. Noble have had seven children, six of whom are yet living. Their only daughter, Emma M., is the wife of Theodore Dodson, now a resident of Otterville. Their eldest son, Israel C. Noble, waseducated principally at Lincoln University, Illinois. As his children have grown up, Mr. Noble has given them the advantage of a liberal education. Mr. Noble, his wife, and four of their children are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, at Otterville, in which church he was elected to the responsible position of a ruling elder, about the year 1856. When Mr. Noble started in life, he possessed but small means, but, being here when the country was new, he availed himself of the advantages to be gained by taking hold of and improving real estate; and, as the result of his foresight and judgment, has secured for himself and family an ample competence. He now owns a farm of near six hundred acres of valuable land in this county. In the business of farming he has been reasonably successful. In his dealings with all, his course has been governed by the strictest integrity and honor, and his character is said to remain, in the estimation of his fellow citizens, as yet untarnished by a dishonorable act, beautifully illustrating the truth of the poet, when he wrote that terse sentence, — “An honest man is the noblest work of God.” In early life, he was politically identified with the whig party, his first vote for president being cast for that immortal statesman, Henry Clay. On the formation of the republican party, he quickly became one of its supporters, and has mostly acted with it ever since. Mr. N. can remember when this county was almost in its natural state, and when deer and other wild animals were in abundance. For many years he has been one of the trustees of the school at Otterville, which was founded and endowed by that generous patron of education, the late Dr. Silas Hamilton. Mr. Noble, by his course of conduct, has won the respect of a large circle of friends, who have known him for the last forty years as a resident of Jersey county.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Dennis PALMER was born in Weybridge, Addison county, Vermont, May 7th, 1828. He is the third child of Elias and Thirza Palmer, who were natives of Vermont. they were married December 4th, 1823, and emigrated to Illinois. In the fall of 1836 they settled on the north-east quarter of section 14, township 9, range 10, Jersey county, where the subject of this sketch, now resides. Mr. Carpenter [sic?] was by trade a carpenter and builder, which he mostly followed in his native state, but after he became a citizen of Greene and Jersey counties he made farming a specialty. He was elected justice of the peace for Jersey county, which position he filled with marked ability for four years, giving general satisfaction to his constituents. In 1860 Mr. Palmer moved to Chesterfield, Macoupin county, for the purpose of giving his daughters superior educational advantages, where he was residing at the time of his death, which occurred September 23d, 1863. His wife died June 15th, 1858. Their remains lie in the cemetery north-west of the village of Kemper, where the heart and hand of affection have reared a suitable marble tablet commemorating their memory – they having erected, while living, a monument more imperishable in the hearts of a large circle of friends and relatives. Mr. Palmer had a family of eight children, five of whom are still living. Three sons are residing in the immediate vicinity of where their parents spent their last years. (See biography of Orrin Palmer, elsewhere in this work.)
     Dennis Palmer received his early education in the common schools of his native state. He was first married April 15th, 1863, to Miss Pauline Alverson, a native of Kentucky, by which union he was the father of one son, Herbert Elias, who is residing with his father. Mrs. Palmer died June 29th, 1866, and on the 10th of September, 1868, Mr. P. was married to his present wife, Mrs. Martha Hoffmagle, who is the daughter of the late Walker Larcie, of Greene county, Ill. They have had one daughter, Stella A.
     Mr. Palmer has made farming the business of his life, with the exception of one year which he spent in the thirty-second regiment Illinois volunteer infantry, during the late rebellion. He is practical as a farmer, methodical as a business man, and public-spirited as a citizen, and is highly esteemed by those who know him.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Orrin PALMER was born in Weybridge, Addison county, Vermont, in October 1832. He is the fifth child of Elias and Thirza Palmer, who were both natives of Vermont. Mr. Palmers was born February 17, 1797, and his wife, Miss Thirza Stowe, on the 23d of the next April. They were married December 4, 1824, and had a family of eight children, four sons and four daughters, of whom three sons and two daughters are still living. They are, in the following order of birth, viz: Elias, residing on section 11, township 9, range 10; Dennis residing on the old homestead, section 14 (see personal history of Dennis Palmer elsewhere); Orrin, residing on section 11; Rebecca, present wife of Franklin Silesby, of Macoupin county, Illinois, near Carlinville; and Olive, residing at this time with her sister, Rebecca. Mr. Palmer emigrated to Illinois and settled on the northeast quarter of section 14, township 9, range 10, in the fall of 1836, where he lived (except about three years residence in Chesterfield, Macoupin county,) till his death, which occurred September 23, 1863. His wife died June 15, 1858. Mr. Palmer and his amiable wife were highly esteemed by a large circle of acquaintances, who still cherish the memory of their many virtues. They have left representatives who are among the prominent citizens of Jersey county.
     Orrin Palmer was educated in the common schools of Greene and Jersey counties, in which he acquired a good, substantial business education. He was married, January 20, 1858, to Miss Mary E., third child of William H. H., and Almira Kemper, the former the postmaster of the town which bears his name. A view of his residence appears in this work. Mr. P. has a family of three children, Ida A., Elmer E. and Norah M., residing with their parents. He is one of the neat, practical farmers of the community in which he resides. He is also proprietor of the warehouse at the station of Kemper, where he attends to the shipping of farm products. Mr. P. is one of the reliable business men of the community in which his active, business life has been spent.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


William PALMER was born in Sutberry, Rutland county, Vt., June 20, 1799. He is the son of William and Abigail Palmer, formerly of Dutchess county, New York. His grandfather, Elias Palmer, was of English descent. William and Abigail Palmer had a family of seven children, three sons and four daughters, all deceased except the subject of this sketch, who is the youngest child. He received his education in his native state, and was married January 13, 1823, to Miss Mary Barton, a native of Addison county, Vermont. They have had a family of six children, three sons and three daughters, in the following order of birth, viz: William George, residing in Macoupin county, three miles southeast of his parents; Mary A., present wife of John C. Dannel (see personal history of J. C. Dannel elsewhere in this work); Franklin, who died in infancy; Henry R., now residing on section 14, on the old homestead; Harriet S., present wife of Milo Stowe, residing on section 2, township 9, range 10; and Martha J., residing with her parents. Mr. Palmer, with his family of three children (at that time) emigrated to Illinois in the fall of 1830, making an overland journey of two months. He located west of Whitehall, where he remained about two years, when he removed to the southeast quarter of section 14(?), township 9, range 10, making on of the first permanent improvements in the township, in which he has since lived for over forty years. Mr. Palmer had small capital to begin with, but having a determined will and energy which knows no failure, he, by honest industry, accumulated means, and became the owner of nearly two thousand aces of land. He and the wife of his youth are still living with their family, who are among the substantial citizens of the community in which they have so long resided, and in which they have won the love and esteem of those who have so long been familiar with them. Mr. Palmer was one of the commissioners appointed by the court of Jersey county to establish the line between Greene and Jersey counties, which duty he performed satisfactorily to all parties. He was for three years one of the county commissioners, and was appointed postmaster under Van Buren’s administration, being the first, or among the first, postmasters in the county. About the years 1845 Mr. Palmer, by a premature discharge of powder while blasting rocks, lost his sight. Although he cannot, by an occular demonstration, know the improvements made in Jersey county during the last twenty-seven years of his life, yet the light of affection, coming, as it does, from his numerous family and friends, meets his inner eye, and cheers his heart with realities more substantial.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Peter R. PARSELL was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, December 25, 1825. He is the son of Jeremiah and Sarah Parsell, who were natives of New Jersey. They had a family of four children, in the following order of birth, viz.: John r., residing on section 25, township 8, range 10; Maria, former wife of Jacob Shurts, of Somerset county, New Jersey; Peter r., residing on section 30, township 8, range 10; and Margaret, former wife of John Merlett, of her native county. Mr. P. followed forming through life. He was one of the prominent practical farmers of Somerset county, in which his entire life was spent. He was highly esteemed by all who knew him, and died, at his residence, October 1, 1869, in the seventy-fifth year of his age. His wife is still living with her son, Peter R. she is now in her eighty-third year, retaining in a remarkable degree her mental and physical capabilities.
     The subject of this sketch was married, February 17th, 1847, to Miss Eliza, daughter of Isaac and Margaret Smalles, of Somerset county, New Jersey. They have had a family of nine children, six sons and three daughters, all still living. They are in the following order of birth, viz.: Margaret, present wife of Thos. M. Herdman, of Neosho Falls, Kansas; Sarah, present wife of Ferdinand H. Spencer, residing near her father, on section 25, township 8, range 11; Isaac, Jeremiah, James, Sophia, Peter, John Ross, and Oliver, all residing with their parents. Mr. P. first settled on the farm where he now resides April 18th, 1866. He came to Jersey county in the spring of 1864. He is one of the energetic, practical farmers which have so distinguished Jersey county. He does his work well and neatly, and in a few years he has improved his farm that (according to its area) there are few, if any, under better cultivation in the county. He is an extensive grower of Osage hedge plants, his yearly crop ranging from three to five million plants. Mr. P. and family attend the Presbyterian church at Jerseyville. The distinguishing traits of Mr. Parsell are his energy and fine taste in his agricultural pursuits. He is respected for his many good qualities, a useful citizen, and an ornament to the community in which he lives. A fine lithographic view of his farm residence appears on another page of this work. [See
1872 Farms & Residences]

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


James B. PINCKARD was born in Monougahhela county, West Virginia, November 28, 1805. He is the sixth child of Rev. Nathaniel and Lucy (Greene, a niece of Gen. Greene, of revolutionary note) Pinkard, who were both natives of Virginia. He removed to Champaign (now Clarke) county, Ohio, in the fall of 1806, where he resided about three years. He then removed to Urbana, Ohio, where he resided till the fall of 1819, when he came to Illinois and settled at Upper Alton, where he resided till his death, which took place in the summer of 1831, in the fifty-eighth year of his age. His wife died in the fall of 1823. They had a family of fourteen children, eight sons and six daughters, all deceased except James B. and three of the daughters. Mr. Pinckard served as justice of the peace for many years both in Ohio and Illinois. He was an active member and divine of the M. E. Church, to which his family were attached. James B. was educated in the common schools of Ohio and Madison county, Ill. He was married May 24, 1827, to Miss Isabella, oldest daughter of Hon. Abraham Amos, who was a member of the first territorial legislature of Illinois. The mother of Mrs. Mary Amos (Mary Garretson) was the first (or second) English child born in the present limits of Illinois. The Garretson family settled nearly one hundred years ago. Mr. Pinckard, by this union, had a family of fourteen children, eight sons and six daughters, seven of whom are now living. His son William is residing on his father’s old homestead. Mr. P. first settled on section 24, township 7, range 10, in the fall of 1831, where he resided until 1865, when he was married to his present wife, Mrs. Elizabeth, relict of the late John Bean, of Jersey county. Since that time he has resided in the village of Brighton. Mr. Pinckard and family are members of the M. E. Church, in which, for many years, he has held official positions. As an upright man and Christian, he is esteemed by a large circle of acquaintance. He has followed farming as a life employment, his farm, near Brighton, being one of the best cultivated in the township.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Hon. William POGUE was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the 23rd of December, 1836. He is the youngest now living of a family of six children of Joseph and Jane K. Pogue. Mr. P, though born in Ireland, was of Scotch descent; his wife of English and Irish extraction. Her father, Hugh Cooper, was one of the older and eminent merchants of Philadelphia. The subject of our sketch was educated in the excellent classical schools of the Quaker city, and one of his first teachers was Samuel Cooper, an able educator of that city. When twelve years of age Mr. Pogue became a student at the male Pennington seminary, New Jersey, where he spent several terms; after which he returned to his native city and entered the employ of James R. Webb, a prominent merchant; operated in that capacity about three years. When seventeen years of age Mr. Pogue came west, and landed at Alton, Illinois, on the 9th of March, 1854. There his first employment was clerking in the post-office, under Hon. R. W. English. In January, 1855, he became a student at law in the office of Hon. Edward Keating, and in November, 1857, when not yet quite twenty-one years of age was admitted to the bar. He immediately after commenced practice in Alton, which continued to be his residence about eight years, a portion of the time in the office of Judge Henry W. Billings. Almost immediately after the commencement of his practice, the people of Alton, in view of his talents and ability as all advocate, elected him city attorney, which was a flattering testimonial to the young lawyer. On the organization of the court in 1859, Mr. Pogue was appointed a master in chancery. On the 27th of December, 1860, he was married to Miss Mary A. Warren, daughter of Judge Warren, of this county. In January, 1862, he removed to Jerseyville and formed a law partnership with Judge Warren, which is still existing. In April, 1872, Gov. Palmer appointed him states attorney of the first judicial district. Politically, he is an advocate of the principles of the democratic party, and his first vote for president was for Stephen A. Douglas. Mr. Pogue and wife are both members of the first Presbyterian church of Jerseyville. They have two sons and one daughter. Mr. Pogue for many years has beenprominently identified with the Sunday school cause, and has become one of its distinguished workers in this state; few gentlemen understand more minutely the field of work, or whose labors exercise a more salutary influence for good, than the subject of this sketch. His industry and energy are seldom surpasssd by members of the bar in this judicial district; and from an organization and ability like his, his friends predict for him an honorable future.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


James T. POST was born in Addison, Addison county, Vermont, August 8, 1799. He is the son of Caleb and Abagail Post, who are natives of New Jersey. They had a family of seven children, all deceased except James T. and Alanson, the latter residing in Pottsdam, New York. Caleb Post, with his family, emigrated to Illinois in the fall of 1828, and settled on Apple creek, two miles west of Whitehall. He was engaged in farming till his death, which occurred in 1850. His wife died in September, 1802. Mr. Post, while in New Jersey and Vermont, followed his trade, which was that of carpenter and builder. The many virtues which adorned his character have been transmitted to his posterity, and appear with undiminished force in his children.
     James T. Post was married, May 6th, 1819, to Miss Ardelia Whitford, of Vermont. They have had a family of six children. Five are living, in the following order of birth, viz.: William, residing at Virden, Illinois; Uriah Smith, residing two miles south of Virden, Illinois; Caleb A., residing three miles east of Jerseyville, Illinois; Sarah, present wife of Lathrop Kirby, residing four miles northwest of Jerseyville; and Justus L., residing on his father’s old homestead. Mr. Post has followed farming as an occupation through life. He settled in Jersey county, on his farm, two miles west of the city of Jerseyville, where he resided till April 10th, 1862, when he retired from his active farm life, and moved to the city of Jerseyville, where he now resides. As one of the old citizens of Jersey county, whose active life has been devoted to its interests, he needs no eulogy. By his energy and the influence of his upright principles, he has made the community better for having lived in it. He is respected by a large circle of acquaintances.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Lewis RANDOLPH was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, December 13th, 1808. He is the second child of Peter and Harriet Randolph, who were also natives of New Jersey. Mr. Randolph’s descent is marked thus: Three brothers, in former years, came from England and settled in this country, and from one of them sprang this branch of the Randolph family. Mr. Randolph was of French descent. They had a family of two children. Mr. Randolph followed blacksmithing and farming. He was highly esteemed in the community where he lived, and died on his farm, August 31st, 1843. Mrs. Randolph survived the death of her husband till August 20th, 1861.
     Lewis Randolph received his early education in the common schools of Somerset county, his time, previous to his marriage, being mostly devoted to assisting his father and attending school. He was married, May 24th, 1828, to Miss Mary a., daughter of Moore and Mary Compton, of his native county. He then engaged in farming, residing on the farm belonging to his father, till the fall of 1837, when he came west, arriving in Jacksonville on the 21st of November. Here he remained during the winter. In April following he moved on the farm where he now resides. In common with the early settlers of the county, Mr. Randolph had many inconveniences and hardships to overcome, but he manfully withstood them, and although beginning with small means, by energy and perseverance he has acquired a comfortable property. His farm is one of the best in the county. Mr. Randolph and wife have had eight children, five of whom are still living. One son and two daughters are married and comfortably settled; two of his sons are living in Montgomery county, Illinois, on land entered by Mr. Randolph in 1850. The two married daughters are residing in Fayette county, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Randolph, and three of their daughters, are members of the Baptist church at Jerseyville. Politically, Mr. r. was a democrat, and cast his first vote for Andrew Jackson; but on the organization of the republican party, he united with that, and has since been a constant supporter of its principles. As a citizen, Mr. Randolph is highly respected; liberal, public spirited, a man of integrity in all his dealings. The principles by which he has been governed have given him a high standing in the estimation of those who are familiar with his past life and history. [See farm view
1872 Farms & Residences]

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Jesse G. REED, Esq., was born at Harper’s Ferry, Virginia, June 5, 1817, and is the third son of George and Lourana Reed. Mrs. R. was the daughter of Jessie Philips, and old resident of Maryland; his ancestors were formerly from England. Mr. George Reed assisted in repelling the British invasion during the war of 1812. His father, Jonathan Reed, was a soldier in the army during the war of the revolution, and participated in many of the memorable events of that patriotic contest. In 1824 George Reed moved with his family to Ohio, and made a permanent settlement in Adams county, where he carried on farming. He was born in the year 1790, and is yet living and enjoying good health for one of his advanced years. For his services in the war of 1812, the government awards him a pension. Mrs. Reed died at the residence of their daughter, Mrs. S. W. Cutler, at Jasper, Pike county, Ohio, March 1, 1871. One of his sons, W. H. Reed, is a prominent lawyer of Portsmouth, Ohio. The subject of this sketch was educated in the schools of Ohio. After leaving school he devoted the subsequent five years to teaching, and in 1843 purchased a store in Sinking Spring, Highland county, Ohio, and carried on merchandising up to 1849, quite successfully. On the 18th October, 1848, Mr. Reed was married to Miss Hannah Williams, daughter of James and Nancy Williams, of Highland county, Ohio. Mr. W. was a native of Kentucky, and his wife of Ohio. Mrs. Reed was born in Highland county, Ohio, July 17, 1829. They have had three children, two sons and one daughter. Their eldest son, James W., and Miss Mary J. Reed, are attending School at Normal, Illinois. Their youngest son, George, is residing with his parents.
     In 1849 Mr. Reed disposed of his store and removed to Piketown, Pike county, Ohio. He there commenced the study of law, in the office of his brother, W. H. Reed, and in 1860 he was admitted to the bar, though previous to that time he had considerable practice. Being a man of natural eloquence, and an intuitive perception of what is right and proper, he has succeeded admirably in the management of his cases. In 1869, he was admitted to practice in the courts of Illinois. With his brother, he was for a time engaged in the banking house of Sargent, Reed & Co., bankers, at Piketown, Ohio. He was elected and served as cashier. In 1856, Mr. R. purchased some stock in a blast furnace, located in Jackson county, Ohio, and the parties who were operating the furnace failed for one hundred and four thousand dollars, and an existing law in the state of Ohio which made each partner amenable for all losses, caused it to fall heavily upon Mr. Reed, and swept away his fortune about the year 1857. In other enterprises Mr. R. has been successful, and partially through the aid of his father-in-law, he succeeded in locating on the farm where he now resides. During the war he practiced law at Piketon, Ohio. In the spring of 1865 he removed with his family to Jersey county, Illinois, locating on a farm in the Illinois bottom. In the narrative of the life of Mr. Reed we can learn many lessons of fortitude and perseverance. While in the flush of prosperity to be broken up financially was not even enough to discourage him, but he set about to retrieve his losses, and has been successful. He and his wife are both members of the Methodist Church. In politics he has for many years supported the principles of the republican party.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


William RHODES was born in Bedford county, Virginia, September 17, 1811. He is the oldest son of Henry and Mary Rhodes, who were natives of Virginia. They had a family of fourteen children, eight of whom are still living. Mr. Rhodes followed farming as an occupation through life. He emigrated to Jersey county in the autumn of 1855, where he resided but a short time previous to his death, which occurred in his seventieth year. His wife also died August 30, 1864. Mr. Rhodes and wife located in Christian county, Kentucky, in the fall of 1833, where they resided about twenty years. The subject of this sketch was educated in the common schools of Virginia. He went to Kentucky with his parents, where he was married, in January, 1835, to his first wife, Miss Sarah Ralston, daughter of Matthew and Nancy Ralston, of Todd county. By this union he had one daughter, the present wife of C. D. Howard, of Elsa, or Jersey Landing. His wife died in 1842. He was again married, April 23, 1844, to Miss Elizabeth Swan, daughter of Francis and Elizabeth Swan. (See personal history of James G. Swan elsewhere in this work.) Soon after his marriage Mr. R. moved to Galena, Illinois, where he resided till the fall of 1847, when he settled in Belleview, Jackson county, Iowa, where he remained about one year, and then returned to Jersey county. He settled, soon after his return, on section 7, township 6, range 11, where he now resides. (A lithographic view of his farm residence appears in this work.) [See 1872 Farms & Residences] Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes have a family of four children living, in the following order: Martha Jane, wife of James K. Frances, of Elsa; William H. residing with his parents; Ann Eliza, present wife of George Smith, residing south of Otterville; and Lucy Virginia, residing with her parents. The experience of Mr. Rhodes in is past life has been varied. In common with his race he has had many trials and afflictions, in all of which he can recognize the hand of an All-wise, over-ruling Providence, whose promise is that “All things shall work together for good to those that love Him.” Mr. Rhodes has been an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church for over forty-one years. He is a worth citizen, and an esteemed member of the society in which he lives.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Guy C. RICHARDS was born in Broome county, New York, November 1, 1819. He is the thirteenth of a family of seventeen children of Daniel and Ruth Richards, eleven of whom are yet living. His occupation was that of a farmer. He left New York and came west in July, 1823, and landed in Morgan county, Ill., where he entered a large tract of land. About the year 1837 he removed to Greene county, and settled near the village of Kane, where he bought a large farm, resided there several years, and then returned to Morgan county, where he died March 24, 1845. Mrs. Richards survived him until April 23, 1858, when her death occurred at the residence of her son in Jersey county.
     Mr. G. C. Richards, at the age of twenty, was married to Miss Hannah Pope, daughter of Mary and Samuel Pope, old residents of Greene county, though formerly from New Jersey. Mrs. Richards can remember when there were only two houses in Jerseyville. They have had a family of six children, all living. Mr. Richards commenced life poor, but now has a farm of between four and five hundred acres of good land. In politics, he is a strong supporter of the principles of the republican party. A fine view of his place is shown in this work. [See
1872 Farms & Residences]

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Milton P. ROBBINS, Esq., was born in Jersey county, Illinois, August 4, 1839. His father, Robert B. Robbins, was a native of Jefferson county, New York, and was born on the 3d of May, 1808. Quite early in life he became an apprentice to the wheelwright trade, and in August, 1830, was married to Miss Lucinda CROWELL, daughter of Samuel Crowell, of Jefferson county, New York. Mr. Robbins and wife had five sons and one daughter, all of whom are yet living. In the fall of 1828 Mr. R. became a citizen of St. Louis, where he resided till 1831, at which time he removed with his family to the present limits of Jersey county, and entered a tract of land about two miles west of Jerseyville, where, for a number of years, his attention was devoted to farming and his trade. He spent the residue of his life at the old homestead. His death occurred in 1846. Mrs. Robbins is yet living, and is now the wife of James W. CALHOUN. Mr. M. D. Robbins was educated in the common schools of Jersey county. Being an apt student, he easily acquired a solid mathematical education. Until about the age of twenty-one, his time was spent alternately at school and on his father’s farm. In 1859 he was employed by Alex. B. Moreau, in his counting room, and in 1860 became connected with the banking house of D’Arcy & Cheeney, as cashier, where he continued till they retired from that business. In 1866 he, in company with Hon. William Shephard, established a banking house in Jerseyville, since which time their business has been in a flourishing condition. On the 10th of December, 1861, Mr. Robbins led to the hymeneal altar Miss Fannie A. BEARDSLEE, daughter of E. S. Beardslee, of Jerseyville. They have had one son. Mr. Robbins and wife are members of the First Presbyterian Church of this city. He is eminently fitted, from experience and ability, to make his mark in the world as a business man. By his cheerful and genial manners he makes many warm friends, and the very index of his countenance bespeaks for the young banker the award of honesty and nobility of heart. As a prominent member of the republican party, he exercises considerable influence in its ranks. His first vote for president was for Abraham Lincoln. During the troublesome times of the late rebellion he stood firm for the cause of the Union. As a banker and financier we bespeak for him in the future a successful career.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Charles ROEMIG was born in Germany, August 3, 1836. He emigrated with his father, Philip, and family, landing in the city of New York, June 28, 1844. His father located in Erie county, New York, where Charles received his education. He came to Illinois, and settled in Rock Island, where he followed his trade, carriage and wagon making, most of the time till June 28, 1865, when he settled in Fidelity, where he is carrying on his trade, repairing machinery, and jobbing. Mr. Roemig was married, December 20, 1866, to Miss Lydia Aydelott, of Fidelity. He was elected justice of the peace, in 1870, which position he fills at this time.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


James ROSS, the eighth of a family of ten children, was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, March 4th, 1803. His parents, John and Martha Ross, were both natives of New Jersey, and were of Scotch and Dutch extraction. Mr. Ross died in 1808. His widow survived him until May 27th, 1853, when she died, being eighty-six years of age. James Ross early in life was thrown on his own resources, and when about sixteen years of age he became an apprentice to his brother-in-law, to learn the blacksmith trade. About five years after he opened a shop, and a year later bought out his former boss and continued the business about fifteen years. In the meantime he had purchased a farm in Somerset county, New Jersey. In the winter of 1838 he disposed of his property and made a trip to Illinois to look at the country, and in July, 1839, he removed with his family to Jersey county, having made the trip with a team. He purchased a farm of Mr. Russell, about three miles east of Jerseyville, where he resided for many years. On the 29th of March, 1826, he was married to Miss Alletta Vanarsdale, daughter of Christopher and Sarah Vanarsdale, of Somerset county, New Jersey. They have had three children, all of whom are yet living, and all married. At present Mr. Ross and wife are residing in Jerseyville.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Alfred RUE was born in Monmouth county, New Jersey, February 21st, 1813. He is the son of William and Rebecca Rue, who were both natives of the same county. They had a family to ten children – seven sons and three daughters – and of this family Alfred and George are citizens of Jersey county. William Rue followed tanning and currying as the principal business of his life. He died in 1859, aged eighty-two years, and his wife died in the spring of 1872, at the advanced age of ninety-five years.
     Alfred Rue was educated in the common schools of New Jersey, and followed the trade of a carpenter in his early business life. He emigrated to Illinois in 1835, and settled in Whitehall, where he remained about one years, working at his trade. He then removed to Grafton, Illinois, where he remained but a short time, and in October, 1836, he removed to Bloomington. He remained in Bloomington until the spring of 1838, when he came to Jerseyville, where he has since resided. On the 21st of March, 1838, Mr. Rue was married to Miss Matilda Baker, of McLean county, Illinois. As a result of this union, they have had a family of five children – four sons and one daughter – three of whom are still living. Although Mr. Rue began his life with small means, he has been successful as a business man, having, by honest industry, acquired a competence. He followed building until the spring of 1857 (being associated most of the time with his brother Aaron), when they commenced dealing in lumber in a small way at Jerseyville, which business they enlarged until 1862, when Mr. Alfred Rue became sole proprietor, and continued the business, which is now conducted by the firm of A. Rue & Co. His two sons, William and Adolphus H., constitute with him the present firm, which is among the most extensive inland lumber dealing establishments in this part of the state. Politically, Mr. Rue in early life was a democrat, but latterly has been connected with the republican party. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Rue, by an upright course of dealing, has gained friends, and, as a business man, is worthy of the confidence reposed in his by a large circle of patrons and acquaintance throughout the community in which he is well known and highly esteemed for his many virtues.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Joseph RUSSELL is a native of Shenandoah county, Virginia. He was born November 14, 1783, and is the third child of Joseph and Margaret Russell. Mr. Russell, father of the above, was an old settler of Virginia. His occupation was that of a farmer; and in the fall of 1800, he removed, with his family, to Hawkins county, Tennessee. They both died in that county.
     The subject of this sketch received his early education in the district schools of Virginia and Tennessee. While in his minority, his time was mostly spend on his father’s farm. After the death of his father, he purchased the homestead. In October, 1823, he was married to Miss Jane G. Richards, of Frederick county, Va. She was the daughter of John Richards. Mr. Russell and wife had six children, two of whom are still living – one daughter the wife of Judge Powell; the other, the wife of Col. Fulkerson. Mr. Russell carried on his farm for many years, besides keeping a public house, in which business he made considerable money, and early commenced to invest in Illinois lands, mostly situated in the present limits of Jersey county. He resided in one place in Tennessee for sixty-five years. He gave his children the advantages of a good education. Struggling along, in early life, poor, he was yet enabled, by good management, to amass a comfortable fortune, though his venerable wife deserves a great deal of credit in the acquisition of their property. Mrs. Russell is a member of the Presbyterian Church. In 1865, Mr. Russell and his wife removed to Jersey county, and are now making their home with their children. It has been Mr. Russell’s privilege to have lived under every administration of this government, including that of George Washington, whom he frequently saw. Few citizens now living can remember as far back in the history of this country as this venerable old gentleman. At the advanced age of eighty-nine, he yet enjoys excellent health.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Thomas B. RUYLE was born in Tennessee, near Nashville, Feburary 28th, 1820. He is the oldest son of Henry and Elizabeth Ruyle, who were among the pioneer settlers of Illinois. First, they settled on Shoal creek, in the southern part of the state, about the time Illinois was admitted into the Union. Here they remained about three years, when they returned to Tennessee, remaining there till the fall of 1826, when they again came to Illinois, locating in Franklin, Morgan county, when they removed to Scottsville, Macoupin county, Illinois. Here they resided till their death. Mrs. Ruyle died in 1830, and her husband in March, 1832. Mr. Ruyle was a native of Virginia. His wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas B. Smith, was a native of Pennsylvania. Henry Ruyle, Sr. (grandfather of Thomas B.) And Mr. Smith were both early settlers in Tennessee, where Henry and Elizabeth were married, in 1814. By this union they had a family of seven children, of whom five are still living, viz.: Lucinda, wife of Benj. Scott, residing four miles north of Greenfield, Greene county, Illinois; Thomas B., residing on section 15, township 9, range 10; Elizabeth, present wife of Wm. Burthlet, of Berdan, Greene county, Illinois; William L. (see his personal history published elsewhere in this work); and Iantha Jane, present wife of William Armitage, of New Orleans. Although many years have elapsed since Mr. and Mrs. Ruyle have passed from the active scenes of earth, their memory is still cherished, not only by their surviving children, but by many of the early pioneer settlers who knew them. He was a man of untiring energy, disinterested benevolence, and public spirit, and transmitted to posterity, through his children, who are among the prominent citizens of the same portion of the state, those noble qualities which made him so highly esteemed.
     Thomas B. Ruyle received his early education in the common schools of Macoupin and Greene counties. He came to the present limits of Jersey county in March, 1832, and resided for a short time with his uncle, William Rice. He was then employed by Major Pruitt until 1836, after which, by Josiah Jackson, for two and a half years. He was married, February 2d, 1843, to Miss Mary, daughter of Amos and Eliza Pruitt. George Pruitt, father of Amos, was on of the early “Rangers,” who was distinguished for his record in the Indian wars of Illinois. He was among the pioneer settlers of the state, and his family were early settlers of Greene and Jersey counties. Thomas B. Ruyle has had a family of twelve children, seven sons and five daughters, of whom five of each sex are still living. They are in the following order of birth, viz.: Amos, residing near his parents; Charles, engaged in the firm of Ruyle & Elliot, dealers in dry goods, groceries, and notions, at the young and thriving village of Kemper, Jersey county, Illinois; Lucinda Jane, present wife of Hiram Wright, residing near Kemper; Eliza, Mary, Celia, Thomas B., Jr., George, Henry, and Sarah Ann, all residing with their parents. Mr. Ruyle, after his marriage, resided upon section 21 till March 3d, 1858, when he removed to the farm on which he now resides(section 15, township 9, range 10). He is one of the prominent farmers of the county, representing a very desirable farm. As a citizen he is esteemed for his many good qualities; is an upright business man, and public spirited.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


William L. RUYLE was born near Nashville, Tennessee, October 18th, 1825. He is the son of Henry and Elizabeth Ruyle. Mr. Henry Ruyle was a native of Virginia. His wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas B. Smith, was a native of Pennsylvania. Henry Ruyle, Sr., the grandfather of Wm. L., and Thomas B. Smith, were both early settlers in Tennessee. Henry and Elizabeth Ruyle were married in 1814. They moved to Illinois at an early day, and settled on Shoal creek, in the southern portion of the state, remaining about three years, when they returned to Tennessee, where they remained till the fall of 1826, when they settled in Franklin, Morgan county, Illinois, where they resided about one year, and then removed to Scottsville, Macoupin county, Illinois, where they resided until their death. Mrs. Ruyle died in 1830, and Mr. Ruyle in March, 1832. They were pioneers in three of the present counties of the state. They had a family of two sons and five daughters, five of whom are still living. They are in the following order of birth, viz.: Lucinda, present wife of Benjamin Scott, of Greene county, Illinois; Thomas B., residing on sec. 15, township 9, range 10 (see his personal history elsewhere in this work); Elizabeth, present wife of William Burthlet, of Berdan, Greene county, Illinois; William L., residing on section 28, township 9, range 10; and Iantha Jane, present wife of William Armitage, residing in New Orleans. Mr. Ruyle was distinguished for his energy, and esteemed for his many qualities. He leaves representatives who are among the prominent citizens of Greene and Jersey counties.
     Mr. William L. Ruyle was educated in the common schools of Macoupin county. He went to California (soon after the discovery of gold in that section) in the fall of 1848, where he remained about two years, following mining most of the time. He returned and purchased the farm on which he now resides. He began life with small means, but he possessed energy and a good physical constitution, and by good management and industry has secured a competence for himself and family. His stock farm is among the best in the county, and his farm residence (a lithographic view of which appears in this work) [See
1872 Farms & Residences] is one of the most capacious and elegant in Jersey county. Mr. Ruyle was married, October 9th, 1855, to Miss Mary Jane, daughter of Louis and Elizabeth Elliott, who were at that time residing in Jersey county. (Mr. E. was one of the pioneers of the state, and of Macoupin county.) They have by this marriage eight children, in the following order of birth, viz.: The oldest (not named) deceased in infancy, Henry, Elizabeth, Annas, Laura, Lewis, Lucinda, and Edgar, all residing at home with their parents. Mr. Ruyle, since his return from California, has been engaged in improving his farm, which, at this time, contains about five hundred acres. He is respected for his energy and public spirit as a citizen, and highly esteemed by a large circle of friends and acquaintances.

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page


Henry RYAN was born in Greene county, Ill., three miles southwest of Carrollton, March 28, 1831. He is the seventh child of John and Jane Ryan. John Ryan was a native of Chester County, Pennsylvania; his wife (Jane Wilcox), of Canada West. They were married at Zanesville, Ohio, soon after the last war with England. They had a family of eight children, in the following order of birth, viz: Richardson, residing on section 35, township 9, range 10; Sarah, deceased; Mary, relict of the late Dr. Javis Bringhurst, of the same township; Dr. Charles Ryan, of Springfield, Ill.; Jane, former wife of Wm. C. Farrow, of township 9, range 10; John, a citizen of Macoupin county, near Virden; Henry, the subject of this sketch; and Catharine, present wife of Wm. M. Stevenson, residing on section 35, township 9, range 10. John Ryan emigrated to Illinois, and settled five miles south of the present site of Jerseyville in the fall of 1825, where he resided till 1828, when he located about three miles southwest of Carrollton, where he resided till the spring of 1840, when he returned to the present limits of Jersey county, and settled on land which he had previously entered, in section 27, township 9, range 10, where he resided till his death, which occurred January 27, 1865. His wife died July 11, 1852. Mr. Ryan spent most of his time working at his trade – millwright. He worked on the first mill erected in Greene county. He was a man highly esteemed and respected by all who knew him.
     Henry Ryan received his early education in the common schools of Greene county. He was married October 2, 1852, to Miss Catharine, daughter of James Farrow, who was one of the early settlers of the county. Mrs. Ryan and her only child died December 23, 1853. He was again married, September 26, 1861, to Miss Almira, daughter of John Thomas, son of Samuel Thomas, the first settler of Greene county. By this union he has two sons and two daughters, all residing with their parents. Mr. Ryan is one of the prominent and energetic stock growers in the county, and takes pride in raising good stock. His fine taste and methodical management in farming is manifest to even a casual observer who may visit his premises. A fine lithographic view of his substantial farm residence, and a brief history of his stock farm, appear elsewhere in this work. [See
1872 Farms & Residences]

1872 Atlas Index     Jersey County Page

No surnames tagged for this post.