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Jersey County Page     Early Settlers

1872 Atlas
Histories of Farms and Residences,
Illustrations

From the Atlas Map of Jersey County, Illinois – 1872, Andreas, Lyter & Co., Davenport, IA, 1872. Thanks to Jersey County Historical Society, Carol Rhodes Van Valkenburgh and Marty Crull. All illustrations open in a separate window. There will be errors, both in original document and transcriptions.

Histories – Farms and Residences & Illustrations

BATES, Silas

BELL, Jeremiah

BROOKS, Charles

BURNEY, David D.

CADWALADER, John

CARKHUFF, N. W.

CHAPMAN, John F.

CUMMINGS, C. C.

CUMMINGS, Mary A.

ELY, Mrs. Mary Ann

ENGLISH, Hon. J. N.

GARRETSON, Garret R.

HAWLEY, W. S.

KEMPER, W. H. H.

LOCKE, John

McADAMS, William

PARSELL, Peter R.

POWELL, O. P.

PRITCHETT, D. P.

RANDOLPH, Lewis

RICHARDS, Guy C.

RHODES, William H.

ROSS, James C.

RUYLE, Col. Wm. L.

RYAN, Henry

SNEDEKER, Samuel

STELLE, Jacob K.

TERRY, Jasper M.

Van HORNE, James E.

VAUGHN, Josiah

WATSON, Thomas C.

WINSOR, John C.

 

 

Businesses:

Grafton Mills

Jerseyville Republican

Newbern Mills

 

 

 

Illustrations (no history)

BOWKERS, William

BUCKLES, John

CHRISTOPHER, Henry

COLEAN, Francis

DEMPSEY, W. S., Valley House, Grafton

DARLINGTON, Sarah

DOUGHERTY, John G.

ELY, Isaac R.

EVANS, John W.

FISHER, C. B.

FITZGERALD, James B.

FROST, James C.

FULKERSON, Col. Wm. H., view #1

FULKERSON, Col. Wm. H., view #2

FULLER, E. M.

GIERS, F.

HAMILTON, C. M.

HAYNES, Adam

HICKMAN, John B.

McCOLLISTER, Isaac

SANDERS, Charles W.

SCHATTGEN, F. X.

SEMPLE, Gen. Jas.

SNEDEKER, Isaac

SEMPLE, Mrs. Lucy V. Semple

SWAN, James G.

TOLMAN, S. W.

Grafton Stone Co.

Jersey County Court House

Jerseyville Public School

Jersey County Poor House

Otter Creek Mills

St. Patrick’s Church Grafton

 

 

 


SILAS BATES, Township 8, Range 10 – This place was settled and bought by Silas Bates, the present proprietor, in 186-, a small frame house and barn being the only improvements at the time of the purchase. The present house is a frame building, one and one-half stories high, has a good cellar and eleven rooms; the furniture is in good condition. Two fine wells furnish all the water that is necessary for all purposes. The house and yard are shaded with forest and evergreen trees of different varieties. The barn was constructed in 18_8, and is suitable for all the farming purposes for which it was intended. Among the other noticeable out-buildings are corn cribs, granary, wagon shed, etc. The orchard contains one hundred and forty trees of several varieties. Of small fruit we notice an abundance. One thousand rods of hedge, one thousand rods of rail, and one thousand rods of board fencing enclose and sub-divide this fine farm. Four hundred acres are under a fine state of cultivation, and three hundred acres are in grass and pasture. In the pastures there is living water. Of live stock, there are thirty horses, thirty cows, thirty-eight sheep, and sixty hogs. There are two hundred acres of fine timber on section 6, one and a half miles distant from the farm. Jerseyville is five miles distant, where a good market awaits all the products of this portion of the county. It is half a mile from the house to a good public school. The property is valued at seventy-five dollars per acre, which is a low calculation, when we come to remember the large crops that have been raised on this place. The neighborhood is well settled, and comprises many of the early pioneers.

View: Silas Bates farm.

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JEREMIAH BELL, Township 8, Range 10 ? This fine body of land was first settled and improved by the present proprietor in 18_2. At the time of purchase there was a small log house on the place. The fine mansion erected on the place was built by Mr. Bell. It is a frame building, two stories in height, has a good cellar, and contains fifteen rooms. The furniture is in good condition. Two good wells of water furnish all that is necessary for the different purposes about this place. The yard and lawn are shaded with different varieties of cedar, pine, and forest trees. The barn was built in 18_1, and is in good condition: there are, also, several other outbuildings on the place. The orchard contains some thirty trees of good varieties. Of small fruits, we note an abundance about the place. Four miles of rail and board fencing are used in enclosing and subdividing this place. There are one hundred and eighty-five acres under cultivation and sixty-five acres in grass and pasture. The live stock comprises seven horses, twenty-seven cows, one hundred and forty sheep, and sixty-five hogs. There are one hundred and twenty acres of fine timber on sections 8 and 9. It is ten miles to Jerseyville and six miles to Brighton. There are good markets, where the products of the surrounding country find a ready sale. The public school is one and a half miles distant from the residence. The soil is well drained, high, and rolling. Fine crops, both is regard to quantityand quality, have been raised on the place for several years. The place is valued at one hundred dollars per acre. The neighborhood is composed on many of the old settlers. The schools are of an excellent character, and the religious institutions will compare favorably with any in similar localities. The citizens are energetic, and in full accordance with the public spirit and enthusiasm to characteristic of the people of this county. A view of this place is shown in another part of this work. From the house, a fine view of the surrounding county may be had, extending for many miles on every side.

View: Jeremiah Bell farm.

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CHARLES BROOKS, Township 8, Range 11 – This farm was bought by the present owner in 1853, and the residence, which is a frame house, two stories high, was built by him in 1866. The place is well supplied with water, and the yard is shaded with evergreens and maples. There are two fine orchards on the place. For livestock, we notice Mr. B. has five horses, twenty-three head of cattle, and eighty hogs. The soil is well drained. Jerseyville is three miles from the place. The neighborhood contains many public-spirited citizens, who are ever in favor of the improvements of the age.

View: Charles Brooks farm.

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DAVID D. BURNEY, Township 7, Range 11 ? This place was first settled by Felix Burney, in 1844, Mr. David D. Burney, the present proprietor, purchased the property in 1863. At that time the improvements consisted of a house, and eighty acres under cultivation. The house is a frame building, two stories in height, has a good cellar, eight rooms, and is well furnished. Two fine wells and a spring furnish plenty of water for domesticate and stock purposes. The yard is shaded with fruit and forest trees. The barn was built in 1858. A granary and corn-crib are among the outbuildings. There is an orchard of one hundred and sixty trees in a fine bearing condition. Of small fruits there is an abundance. There are six hundred and forty rods of hedge, three hundred and twenty rods of rail, and eighty rods of board fencing. One hundred and seventy acres are under cultivation and eighty acres is grass and pasture. For livestock, Mr. Burney has seven horses, forty-four cattle, and eighty-five hogs. He is extensively engaged in raising fine breeds of hogs, the celebrated Poland China ranking as the best. In regard to timber, he has eighty acres on section 10, which is two and a half miles distant. Mr. Burney’s residence is five and one-half miles from Jerseyville and two miles from Delhi. The products of the farm find a good market at both places. The public school is three-fourths of a mile distant. The neighborhood is old and well settled, and has excellent educational and religious advantages. This property is valued at seventy-five dollars per acre, which, when we consider its fine location and many advantages, is an extremely low valuation. A fine view of the place is shown in another part of this work.

View: David D. Burney farm.

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JOHN CADWALADER, Township 7, Range 12, – This property was firstsettle by William Hamilton, in 1830. At the time Mr. C. purchased theplace, in 1838, the land was in good state of cultivation. The house,which was built by the present owner, is constructed of wood, twostories in height, contains eight rooms, has a good cellar underneath, and is comfortably furnished throughout. There is a good well of water on the place. The yard is shaded with forest and evergreen trees. The barn was erected in 1839, and is in good condition at the present time. The orchard comprises some fifty fine fruit-bearing trees. The farm is enclosed and sub-divided by one hundred rods of hedge and three miles of rail fencing. The amount of land under cultivation is one hundred and sixty acres, which is thoroughly cultivated. Otterville, which is a good market, is one mile distant from the place, and the public school is the same distance from the house. The soil is well drained, and large crops of a good quality have been raised. The farm is valued at eighty dollars per acre. The neighborhood is composed of many of the early settlers. The society is of the best, and one and all take an interest in all that promotes the educational and religious ideas of the citizens of the community at large. A view of this fine place is shown in another part of this work, which it will repay the peruser to examine.

View: John Cadwalader farm.

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N. W. CARKHUFF, township 8, range 11 – This place was settle by HenryHoagland in 1849. The farm was purchased by the present owners in 1854. The present house was built by the owner. A good well and spring furnish plenty of water. The lawn is shaded with forest and pine trees. The barn was built in 1855. A granary, smoke-house, andcorn-crib comprise the other out-buildings. The orchard contains three hundred trees. Of fencing, there are six hundred rods of hedge, and of rail, one hundred and sixty rods. There is under cultivation one hundred acres, and sixty acres if grass and pasture. Of live stock, there are twelve horses, fifteen cattle, twenty sheep, and one hundred hogs. Jerseyville is four miles from the place, and it is one and a half mile to a good, public school. The soil is rich and large crops have been raised. The land is valued at eighty dollars per acre. The neighborhood is composed of wide-awake citizens.

View: N. W. Carkhuff farm.

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JOHN F. CHAPMAN, Township 8, Range 10 – This property was first settled by Thomas H Ryan, in 1830. The property was purchased by the present proprietor in 1870, at which time there were one hundred and twenty acres improved and under a good state of cultivation. The house was built in 1832, by T. H. Chapman. It is a frame structure, two stories high, contains ten rooms, and has a good cellar. The furniture is in good condition. Water is obtained from three good wells, which furnish an abundance for all necessary purposes. The lawn and yard are shaded with a fine grove of locust, maples, and pine trees. The barn was built in 1854, and is in good repair. There is always an abundance of fruit, obtained from a fine orchard of two hundred and fifty trees. Currants, gooseberries, etc, abound in great plenty, and furnish all that is needed for the house. The place is enclosed and divided by two hundred and forty rods of hedge, on and a half miles of rail, and thirty rods of board fencing. There are one hundred and twenty acres under cultivation, and thirty acres in grass and pasture. Mr. C. has for live stock, five horses, twelve cows, and seventy-five hogs. Jerseyville is seven miles distant, and one of the best markets for the farm products in the county. One-quarter of a mile distant there is a good public school. The soil is well drained, is rich, and of good depth. All the tillable land is in fine condition, and under cultivation. Large crops have been raised, and of fine quality. The neighborhood is old and well settled. Everything that tends to the promotion of the welfare of the citizens in a religious and educational point of view receives their cordial support. Among our many views may be found that of the pleasant place of John f. Chapman. The farm is located in one of the best portions of the county, and will compare with the best in this part of the county.

View: John F. Chapman farm.

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C. C. CUMMINGS, Township 7, Range 11 – This body of land was firstsettled by Silas Hurd, in 1833, at the time Mr. C. purchased the place, the improvements consisted of a frame house, barn, wagon house, corn crib, etc. The present residence, which was erected in 1866, is a frame house, two stories high, contains ten rooms, and is well furnished. Two wells supply the water. The yard is shaded and ornamented with forest and evergreen trees. The barn, which is a frame building was erected in 1848. We note a fine, thrifty orchard of some sixty fruit-bearing trees, of several different varieties, besides an abundance of small fruit for home consumption. Forty rods of hedge, one and one-half miles of rail, and ninety rods of board fence are used in enclosing and sub-dividing this farm. There are eighty acres under a fine state of cultivation, and twelve acres is grass and pasture, on which there is living water during a greater part of the year. Mr. C’s live stock consists of five horses, six head of cattle, and seventy hogs. The distance to Jerseyville is five miles, and the public school is one mile distant. The soil, which is somewhat undulating, is well drained, and good crops of a fine quality are raised thereon. The land is valued at $100 per acre. The neighborhood is old and well settled, and ranks with the best in regard to all that constitutes good society. A view of this pleasant place is shown in another part of this work.

View: C. C. Cummings farm.

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MARY A CUMMINGS, township 7, range 11 – This place was first settled by Thomas Cummings in 1827, at which time he purchased the same. It had no improvements whatever at the time of purchase; but since then there has been built a frame house, one and a half stories high, containing twelve rooms well furnished. Three good wells supply all the water that is needed. The grounds are ornamented with forest and evergreen trees. The barn was erected in 1850. There are also numerous other out-buildings. The orchard contains three hundred trees, which bear a large amount of fruit. Ten miles of rail, and six hundred and forty rods of board fencing, enclose and divide this farm. Five hundred acres are under cultivation, and two hundred acres in grass and pasture. There is living water in the latter. The live stock consists of eighteen horses, one hundred cattle and sixty hogs. Jerseyville is four miles distant, and Alton fifteen miles from the farm. They are good markets. The soil is well drained and fertile. Large crops have been raised. The land is valued at seventy-five dollars per acre, which is a low estimate, as will be shown in a few years hence. The neighborhood is composed of many of the early pioneers, who, when they came into this region of the country, little dreamed that the then raw prairie would be made to blossom like the rose. The citizens rank with the best in their moral and intellectual improvements. A view of the house and place is shown in another part of this work.

View: Mary Ann Cummings farm.

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MRS. MARY ANN ELY, Township 8, Range 10 – This property was first settled by R. R. Ely, in 1854. At the time of purchasing there were no improvements on the place. Mr. Ely, deceased since the purchase, erected a pleasant and home-like frame house, on and a half stories high, containing seven rooms, and a good cellar underneath. The house is well furnished throughout. The place is bountifully supplied with good water, which is obtained from two wells. The yard is shaded with a fine assortment of locust, and different varieties of fruit trees. The barn was built in 1859, and is in a good condition, and suitable for stock. Among the other outbuildings are a granary, corn crib, poultry house, ice house, etc. There is a fine orchard of one hundred and fifty fruit-bearing trees. Currants, gooseberries, strawberries, raspberries, and other small fruits, are on the place. The farm is enclosed and sub-divided by four hundred and eighty rods of hedge, four hundred and eighty rods of rail, and four hundred and eighty rods of board fencing. On hundred and sixty acres are under a good state of cultivation, and forty are in grass and pasture. The live stock consists of six horses, eleven cows, and forty-five hogs. There are ten acres of timber on another section, two and a half miles distant. The farm is ten miles from Jerseyville, where all the products of the farm find a quick and ready sale. A good public school is only one-fourth of a mile distant. The neighborhood isamong the best in the county, and with the superior location of thisfarm, and the fertile soil, the improvements, etc., it ranks among the most desirable in the county.

View: Mary Ann Ely farm.

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HON. J. N. ENGLISH, Jerseyville – This fine place was purchased in 1867 by Mr. E., by whom the mansion was erected. It is a frame building, two stories in height, has good cellars, and is well furnished. The yard is shaded with forest and ornamental trees, and there is an abundance of small fruit. Jerseyville is one mile distant from the residence. The live stock on the place at present consists of nine horses, four cows, and ninety hogs. The soil is of the best kind for the various productions of the farm. The neighborhood is composed of many of the early pioneers. Among the many illustrations of this work may be found the handsome residence of the Hon. J. N. English.

View: Hon. J. N. English, residence, west suburbs, Jerseyville

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GARRET R. GARRETSON, Main Street, Fidelity. This fine property was first settled by W. H. Miner, who broke the ground and fenced the place in 1830. Mrs. Garretson, the present proprietor, purchased the place in 1836. At the time of the purchase there was a small house containing two rooms. The present house was built by the proprietor in 1839. It is a frame building, two stories high, has good cellar, contains nine rooms, and the furniture is in good condition. A good well furnishes a bountiful supply of water. The barn was built in 1838. The other out-buildings comprise granary, carriage and wagon sheds. In the orchard there are one hundred fruit trees. There is an abundance of small fruits, consisting of blackberries, etc. Of fencing we note nine hundred and sixty rods of hedge, sixty rods of rail, and fifty rods of board, used in enclosing and sub-dividing theplace. There are two hundred acres under cultivation, and forty acres in grass and pasture; has water in the pasture. Mr. G. has for live stock, fifteen horses, eight cows, and eighty-five hogs. There is a find body of timber on sections 4, 7,n 8, and 10, two and one-half miles distant from the place. Fidelity in one mile from the farm and Jerseyville ten miles. They are both good points for the sale of the farm products. There is a good public school near the place. The soil is well drained. The land is valued at seventy-five dollars per acre. The neighborhood is old and well settled, and ranks with the best inthis portion of the county. A view of the place is shown in this work.

View: Garret R. Garretson residence.

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W. S. HAWLEY, Jerseyville. The fine residence of W. S. Hawley will strike the eye of the observer by its fine, symmetrical proportions. It is build of brick, three stories high, containing eight rooms, has a good cellar, and is well furnished throughout. The yard is adorned and shaded with ever-greens and forest trees. The orchard contains three hundred fruit trees. Mr. Hawley’s live stock consists of two horses, two cows, and ten hogs. A good school is four blocks distant from the place. The house is one of the finest suburban residences in the city of Jerseyville.

View: Wm. S. Hawley residence.

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W. H. H. KEMPER, Township 9, Range 10. This fine place, which is owned by Mr. Kemper, is shown in another portion of this work. The present fine house was built by the present proprietor in 18__. It is a frame house, one and one-half stories high, has a good cellar, and contains eight rooms. Two wells and two springs furnish a bountiful supply of water. The yard and lawn are well shaded with a variety of maple, cedar, and forest trees. The bard was erected about 1830. A fine orchard of three hundred fruit-bearing trees attract our attention by their thrifty looks. There is an abundance of grapes, pears, etc. The place is enclosed and divided by six hundred and forty rods of hedge and three miles of rail fencing. One hundred and forty acres are under good cultivation and sixty acres are in grass and pasture. There is living water in the pasture. Mr. Kemper’s livestock consists of ten horses, seven cows, five sheep, and twenty hogs. There is some fine timber on section _. Fidelity, four miles distant, and Kemper, are both good market towns for all the produce of the farm. The public school is half a mile from the house. The soil is well drained. Large crops have been raised, and of first-class quality. The neighborhood is old, and is composed of many of the old settlers, who take an interest in all that tends to advance the moral and religious ideas of the people of this portion of the county. The town of Kemper is situated on the same quarter section as Mr. Kemper’s farm, hence any person can easily perceive that this farm will be valuable for building lots in a few years to come, as this is the central point of a large amount of fine farming land.

View: W. H. H. Kemper, farm residence

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JOHN LOCK(E), Township 6, Range 11 – This farm was settled and bought byJohn Lock in 1870. The present house was built by Mr. L. It is a frame house, two stories in height, contains ten rooms and has a good cellar. Good wells and twenty-five springs furnish an abundance of water, both for the house and all the stock purposes. The lawn is shaded with oak and hickory trees. The barn was built in 1872, it thirty by sixty feet in size. Among the other buildings we notice a store thirty by sixteen feet, with cellar underneath. The orchard contains one hundred and fifty trees of several varieties. This farm is enclosed and divided with three miles of rail and five miles of board fencing. There are three hundred and twenty-five acres under cultivation, and of grass and pasture there are one hundred and fifty acres. There is living water in the pastures. For live stock Mr. L. has seven horses, seventy-three head of cattle, and seventy-six hogs. Mr. L. has one thousand one hundred acres of timber in sections 14, 15, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26. Alton is eight miles from the farm, and Jerseyville thirteen miles; they are both good markets. The public school is three quarters of a mile distant. The soil is well drained and the land is undulating. Large crops have been raised, consisting of wheat and corn. The land is valued at the present time at thirty dollars per acre. The land is well adapted for wheat, corn, grapes, peaches, apples, or the many small fruits. The community, for intelligence and industry, will compare with any in the county. Sections 25 and 26 have one mile and three-quarters frontage on the Mississippi river, which affords a good landing for steamboats.

View: John Lock(e) farm.

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WILLIAM McADAMS, Township 7, Range 18. This property was first settled by James F. Terry and Elijah Brown in 1830, the property being bought by the present owner in 1863, at which time the improvements consisted of a house, barn, and other outbuildings. The house was built by Aaron Noble. It is constructed of wood, is two stories high, has a good cellar, and contains sixteen rooms. The furniture is in good order. A good well and six springs furnish an abundance of water for all the different purposes. The yard and lawn are ornamented with several varieties of evergreen, forest, and fruit trees. The barn was erected in 1863, and is in good condition; the other outbuildings are also in good order. The orchard (which is a fine one) contains two hundred and ten fruit trees of many varieties; the small fruits, of which there is an abundance, comprises grapes, blueberries, etc. The farm is enclosed and subdivided by six miles of rail and two mile of board fencing. Four hundred and forty acres of the farm are under cultivation and one hundred acres in grass and pasture. In the pasture there is living water. For livestock there are thirteen horses, ten cows, eighty sheep, and one hundred and fifty hogs. He also owns one hundred acres of fine timber on sections 11 and 12. Otterville is one mile, and Jerseyville six miles from the farm. Both are good markets. The public school is one mile distant. The soil is well drained and of good depth. As has been said of several others of these histories, the neighborhood is of the best. The land is valued at seventy-five dollars per acre. A view of this place is shown among the many fine sketches of this portion of the county.

View: William McAdams farm.

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PETER R. PARSELL, Township 8, Range 10. This property was first settled by the present proprietor April 16, 1866. At the time of the purchase, it was covered with a growth of hazel brush; but since then he has erected a frame house, two stories high, containing eight rooms, with a good cellar. The furniture is in a good state. Six springs and two wells furnish an abundance of water. The yard and lawn are shaded with rock and silver maple trees. The barn was built in 1872; is twenty-six by fifty feet in its dimensions. The other out-buildings are a corn-crib, granary, etc. The orchard contains one hundred trees of all varieties; small fruits abound in profusion. Of fencing there are one thousand and forty rods of hedge, and seven miles of rail. There is under cultivation one hundred and sixty acres, and in grass and pasture seventy-five acres. There is living water in the latter. Of live stock, there are thirteen horses and mules, sixteen cows, and sixty hogs. The city of Alton is sixteen miles, and Jerseyville three miles distant from the place. They are both good markets. There is a good public school one-fourth of a mile from the house. The farm is a rolling prairie, sandy soil, and is well drained. Average crops have been raised and of good quality. This farm has rewarded its present owner beyond his expectations, for he little thought that the then almost worthless piece of land could be made to yield of its abundance as it has for the last few years. At the present time the place is valued at one hundred dollars per acre. Mr. P. has a half-page view of his place in our work of the county. The neighborhood ranks with the best in all that appertains to good society.

View: Peter R. Parsell farm.

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O. P. POWELL, Township 8, Range 11. This property was first settled by Phillip Grimes, Mr. Powel, the present owner, purchasing the property in 1870. The present fine mansion was built at that time, James D. Russell being the builder of the same. It is constructed of birch, two stories high, has good cellar and ten rooms, and is well furnished throughout. A good well and spring furnish a bountiful supply of water. The lawn is shaded with several varieties of evergreen, forest, and fruit trees. The barn was built in 1866. There are several other out-buildings, which are shown in the view in another part of this work. The orchard contains two hundred fruit trees of different varieties, which furnish an abundance of fruit. The many varieties of small fruits abound in great plenty. The farm is enclosed by two hundred rods of hedge, two hundred rods of rail, and two hundred rods of board fencing. Nine hundred acres of this place are under cultivation and one hundred and fifty are in grass and pasture. There is living water in two of the pastures. As to live stock, there are thirty-five horses, one hundred head of cattle and fifty hogs. Mr. P. also owns three hundred and fifty acres of fine timberland. Jerseyville is three miles distant, where a ready market is found for all the products of the farm. The public school is one mile and a half distant. The soil is well drained, and under a good state of cultivation. Large crops of good quality have been raised for several years. The property is valued at one hundred and seventy-five dollars per acre. The neighborhood is well settled and contains many of the early pioneers, who take an interest in all moral and educational questions. Mr. Powel’s mansion is one of the finest and best built houses in the county, as the reader can see by inspecting the view of it, which may be found in another part of this work. From the cupola a fine view of the surrounding country may be had. There is also a fine circular drive in front of the house.

View: Judge O. P. Powel, residence

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D. P. PRITCHETT, Township 8, range 10. This property was first settled by D. T. Pritchett in 1840. The present owner purchased the place from William I. Pritchett. The house was built in 1869; is of brick, two stories high, containing fourteen rooms, two halls, and good cellar. Three wells and a spring furnish an abundance of water. The yard is shaded with locust and evergreens. The barn, thirty by seventy-two feet in dimensions, was built in 1864. The orchard contains one hundred trees of different varieties. There are under cultivation one hundred and sixty-seven acres, and one hundred and sixty-four in grass and pasture. Mr. P. has for live stock thirteen horses, twenty-five cows, thirteen sheep, and fifty hogs. Jerseyville is nine miles distant. The neighborhood is good. A view of this fine place is shown in another part of this work.

View: D. P. Pritchett farm.

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LEWIS RANDOLPH, Township 8, Range 11. This property was first settled by the present owner in 1838. The mansion was built in 18_8. It is of wood, two stories high, had good cellar, and contains twelve rooms. There is a good well of water on the place. The yard is shaded with maples and evergreens. The barn was erected in 1846, wagon-house and other out-buildings in 1860. The orchard contains five hundred grafted fruit trees, of different varieties of pears, peaches and plums. The place is enclosed and divided with plank and rail fencing. One hundred and seventy acres are under cultivation, and sixty acres are in grass and pasture; mostly prairie; valued at sixty dollars per acre. Delhi depot is one mile from the place, and Jerseyville six miles. They are both good markets. The live stock consists of seven horses, seventeen cattle, sixty sheep, and fifty hogs. A view is shown of the place among our many illustrations.

View: Lewis Randolph farm.

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GUY C. RICHARDS, Township 8, Range 11. This place was first settled by Guy C. Richards in 1845. At the time of purchasing the land there were no improvements. The house was built in 1868; is of wood, two stories high, good cellar, and contains ten rooms. Three wells and a stream afford a bountiful supply of water. The yard is shades with maple trees. The barn was built in 1870. The orchard contains two hundred fruit trees. Three hundred acres are under cultivation, and eighty acres in grass and pasture. Of live stock, there are twenty horses, sixteen cattle, and one hundred and twenty-five hogs. It is on of the best situated farms in Jersey county, and is valued at one hundred dollars per acre.

View: Guy C. Richards farm.

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WILLIAM H. ROADES, Township 6 Range 11. This property was first settled by the present owner in 1850. The house was erected by Mr. R. It is built of brick, is two stories high, good cellar, contains eight rooms, and is well furnished. Good cisterns furnish an abundance of water, both for the house and stock purposes. For shade we notice forest and evergreen trees. The barn was constructed in 1854. Prominent among the other out-buildings we notice a fine granary, erected in 1868. There is also a brick smoke-house, erected in 1861. There is a large orchard of fifteen hundred trees, of many varieties, in good bearing. Small fruits are in abundance. For fencing, there is one hundred rods of hedge, four miles of rail, and twenty rods of board. There are under cultivation one hundred acres, and thirty-five acres in grass and pasture. Mr. R. has for live stock, four horses, five cows, and thirty hogs. It is one-half mile to Elsa, and twelve miles to Jerseyville. A good public school is one and one-half miles from the farm. The soil is well drained and undulating. Large crops have been raised, and in regard to quality, they have been as good as any raised in this section of the county. In regard to the neighborhood we must say it ranks among the best in the county, and for generosity and hospitality, which is extended to all, the citizens are unsurpassed. They take an interest in all that tends to the promotion of the religious and educational views of the citizens of this portion of Jersey county.

View: William H. Rhodes farm.

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JAMES C. ROSS, Township 8, Range 11. This property was first settled by James Ross in 1839. The property was purchased by the present owner, in 1865. At the time of the purchase the improvements consisted of a small house, barn, and corn crib. The present mansion, a view of which is shown in our work of the county, was erected by James C. Ross. It is a frame building, two stories high, has a good cellar, contains ten rooms, and among the furniture we notice a fine piano. A well and two springs furnish a good supply of water. The lawn is ornamented with a fine assortment of the different varieties of trees. The barn was constructed in 1849, and at this time is in a good condition. Among the other out-buildings we note a smoke-house, corn crib, granary, and hay barrack. The orchard contains two hundred and forty trees, of many different varieties, which are in good bearing. On the place we note many kinds of small fruit. There are on the premises two and one-half miles of hedge, one-half mile of rail, and one-half mile of board fencing, which is used in enclosing and sub-dividing the farm. One hundred and sixty acres are under cultivation and fifty in grass and pasture; there is living water in the latter. As to stock, there are seven horses, six cows, twenty-three sheep, and one hundred hogs. Mr. Ross also owns a fine body of timber on section 16, nine miles from the farm. Jerseyville is two and one-quarter miles distant, and St. Louis forty-five miles. A good public school is one and three-quarters miles from the farm. The soil is black sandy, and very rich, and being of good depth, large crops have always been raised of the best quality. Mr. Ross has been offered one hundred and twenty-five dollars per acre for his farm, at which time he did not care to sell. The farm is very desirably located, it being situated in one of the most healthy portions of the county. The neighborhood is old, well settled, and comprises many of the early pioneers. The society is first class in every respect. The citizens are well known for their honesty, and the interest they take in matters of improvement.

View: James Ross farm.

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COL. WILLIAM L. RUYLE, Township 9, Range 10. This place was first settled by Simon Woodroe, about the year 1830, and was purchased by Mr. Ruyle in 1862, at which time there was not much improvement. The fine mansion was built by Mr. Ruyle in 1873. It is built of brick, two stories in height, contains seventeen rooms, has a good cellar, and the furniture is in good condition. The place is well supplied with water, furnished by three wells and two springs. The house and yard are well shaded with fruit and walnut trees. The barn, which was built in 1858, is in good condition, and also the several other outbuildings. The orchard contains one hundred first-class fruit trees, and there is a good variety of the small fruits on the place. Eight hundred rods of hedge and seven miles of rail fence enclose and sub-divide this fine farm. There are three hundred and sixty acres under cultivation, and two hundred acres is grass and pasture, in which there is fine living water. Mr. R.’s livestock consists of twenty horses, one hundred cows, fifty sheep, and one hundred hogs. The neighborhood is old and well settled, and the citizens comprise many of the early pioneers. They are wideawake in respect to all the improvements of the age. A view of Mr. Ruyle’s fine mansion is shown in another part of this work, and all who examine the view will coincide with us in pronouncing the house one of the finest in this section of the country.

View: William L. Ruyle, farm residence

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HENRY RYAN, Township 9, Range 20. This farm was first settled in 1840, by John Ryan, Sr., and was bought by the present proprietor in 1854. The house was built in 1868. Four wells and six springs supply the water for the place. The yard is shaded with elm, ash, and maple. The barn, besides which there are several other outbuildings, was built in 1859. The orchard contains on hundred trees. There are eight hundred rods of hedge and eight miles of rail fences used to enclose and sub-divide the farm. There are two hundred and twenty acres undercultivation, and three hundred and sixty acres in grassland pasture. Seven horses, seventy-five cows, and one hundred hogs comprise the livestock. Fidelity is three and three-fourths miles distant, and thepublic school on and three-fourths miles. The neighborhood is old andwell settled. The property is valued at $100 per acre. A view of thisplace is shown in another part of this work.

View: Henry Ryan, farm residence

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SAMUEL SNEDEKER – This property was first entered by Joseph Guish, in1830. Mr. Snedeker purchased this property in 1843. The house wasre-built by the present owner. Three good wells, afford an abundance of water. The lawn is shaded with soft maple, locust, and walnut trees. The large orchard contains one thousand fruit trees. There is a bountiful supply of small fruits. The place is enclosed and sub-divided by one-half of a mile of rail, one-half on a mile of board, and two miles of Osage orange hedge. The property is valued at two hundred dollars per acre. A view of this place is shown in our work of the county. The neighborhood is composed of many of the early pioneers.

View: Samuel Snedeker, residence, south suburbs, Jerseyville

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JACOB K. STELLE, Jerseyville. This place was first settled by J. K. Steele, in 1838, at which time there were no improvements on the place. The house built of wood, two stories high, containing twelve rooms, and has a good cellar. There are three good wells on the place. The yard is shaded with maples. The orchard contains one hundred and fifty fruit trees, besides which there is an abundance of small fruit. Two hundred and forty acres are under cultivation, and forty acres in grass and pasture. The barn was built in 1850. Twelve horses, ten cows, and seventy-five hogs comprise the live stock. Jerseyville is six miles from the farm, and the neighborhood is old and thickly inhabited.

Views:

Jacob K. Steele, farm, occupied by son M. C. Stelle

Jacob K. Steele, suburban residence

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JASPER M. TERRY, Township 7, Range 12. When this place was first settled by the present proprietor, there were no improvements upon it, it being a raw prairie. The present residence, which was erected in 1872, is a two story frame house, containing eleven rooms and a good cellar, and is well furnished. A fine piano furnishes the music for the family. Four wells supply water for all the different purposes about the place. There is also a fine spring on the place. The yard and lawn are shaded with several varieties of forest and evergreen trees. The barn was built in 18__, and is forty by seventy feet in size. Among the other buildings we notice a granary and stables. The orchard contains four hundred trees of all varieties, which furnish an abundance of fruit for home consumption, while small fruits abound in the greatest profusion. Three miles of hedge, six miles of rail, and two miles of board fence enclose and sub-divide the place. Three hundred and seventy acres are under a good state of cultivation, and sixty acres are in grass and pasture. There is an abundance of water in the latter. Besides this body of land, Mr. Terry has eighty acres of timber on section 27, two miles distant. The distance to Jerseyville is eight miles, and to Alton it is twenty miles. The public school is one and one-half miles from the place. The neighborhood is old and well settled, and contains many of the early pioneers. The land is undulating, and large crops have been raised on the place, which is second to none. The land is valued at eighty dollars per acre. There is a fine grove of timber on the west side.

View: Jasper M. Terry farm.

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JAMES E. VAN HORNE, Township 7, Range 11. Col. E. Van Horne first settled this place in 1834, and Mr. James E. Van Horne, the present proprietor, purchased it in 1871. The residence, which was erected in 1857, is constructed of brick, two stories high, containing fourteen rooms and a good cellar, and is well furnished. Three wells furnish the water. The yard is shaded with forest, pine, and cedar trees. The barn was built in 1865. The orchard contains sixty fruit trees, and there is an abundance of small fruits. Three hundred and fifty acres are under cultivation, and one hundred and sixty acres in grass and pasture. The live stock consists of twelve horses, twenty-six head of cattle, and one hundred and fifty hogs. Sixty acres of timber are on another section, three and one-half miles distant. The distance to Jerseyville is six miles, and to the nearest public school, one mile. The neighborhood is well settled, and ranks among the best.

View: James E. Van Horne farm.

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JOSIAH VAUGHN, Township 8, Range 10. This body of land was first settled by Stanford More. Mr. Vaughn purchased the property in 1846, at which time there were no improvements whatever. The present comfortable residence was built by Mr. V. It is a frame house, two stories high, containing six rooms, and has a good cellar. Three wells furnish all the water that is required. The yard and lawn are ornamented with forest, evergreen and fruit trees of different varieties. On the place we notice a fine orchard of two hundred and seventy fruit trees. Three and one half miles of hedge, one-half mile of rail, and one-quarter mile of board fencing are used in enclosing and dividing this place. Four hundred acres are under cultivation, and one hundred and thirty acres are in grass and pasture. Of live stock, we notice Mr. V. has sixteen horses, fifteen cows, and two hundred and fifty hogs. Mr. Vaughn owns one hundred and forty-five acres of timber on other sections. Eighty acres are seven miles distant, and the balance one and three-quarters miles. Fidelity is two and one-half miles from the place, and Jerseyville eight miles distant. They are both good markets. It is one and one-quarter miles to the public school. The soil is well drained and of the best. Good crops have been raised, both in regard to quality and quantity. The land is value at one hundred dollars per acre. The neighborhood is first-class in every respect. The citizens are well known for their honesty, fair dealings, and the interest they take in all improvements. In another part of the work we show a view of the fine place owned by Mr. Vaughn.

View: Josiah Vaughn farm.

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THOMAS C. WATSON, Township 8, Range 10. This property was purchased by the present proprietor in 1861. The residence was erected in 1867, by T. C. Watson. It is a frame house, two stories in height, has good cellar, and contains nine rooms. A good well furnishes an abundance of water for all the domestic and farming purposes. The lawn is shaded with fruit trees. Among the out-buildings we notice a granary and several other buildings. The place is enclosed by two hundred and forty rods of rail fencing. Eighty acres are under cultivation. There are several acres of fine timber on section 23, seven miles distant. Jerseyville is ten miles distant, and Fidelity is two and on-half miles distant from the place; they are good markets for all the farm products. The public school is two and one-half miles from the farm. The soil is well drained, and good crops are raised. The neighborhood is old and well settled, ranking with the best in regard to all the attributes that constitute the essentialities of the best society. They take an active part in all the improvements of this age. A view of this place will be found in another part of this work, with its many improvements of a modern date with which the house is embellished.

View: Thomas C. Watson farm.

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JOHN C. WINSOR, Township 8, Range 11. This property was first settled in 1844, by the present proprietor. There is a frame house, two stories high, containing eight rooms, and a good cellar, on the place, and the barn, which was built in 1834. A good well of water is on the place. The yard is shaded with different varieties of shade trees. There is a fine orchard of one hundred and fifty trees. Two miles of hedge, one and one-half mile of rail, and three-fourths of a mile of board fence enclose and divide the farm. One hundred acres are under cultivation, and one hundred and ten acres in grass and pasture. The neighborhood is well settled, and up to the times.

View: J. C. Windsor farm.

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GRAFTON MILLS, Grafton, Illinois. James M. Allen, proprietor. These mills were first established in 1835. Since the time of their erection the trade has been constantly increasing, until, at the present time, the celebrated fancy brands “Grafton Manufacturing Co. 000,” and “Allen’s Extra,” are widely known all over this portion of the state. Mr. Allen has had many years experience in the milling business, and is well calculated to give satisfaction to the many customers of the mills.

View: Grafton Mills

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THE JERSEYVILLE REPUBLICAN has been in existence seven years. In 1869, Colonel S. P. Smith purchased the Republican office, and afterwards sold the same to Chapin & Glover, of the Jacksonville Daily Journal, who conducted the paper until August, 1871, when it was purchased by the present proprietor, W. H. Edgar. The Republican is a neat eight-column paper, and is, as its name indicates, republican in its principles and sentiments. At the present time it has an average subscription list of eight hundred subscribers.

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NEWBERN MILLS, Newbern, Illinois. McAdams & Bleyler, proprietors. These mills are located in one of the best wheat growing districts in the state, and they have the facilities for turning out the finest brands of flour, as is well known by their many customers. The mills are seven miles south of Jerseyville, four and one-half miles west of Delhi, and six miles northeast of Jersey Landing. The products of the mills can be shipped east and south by rail and river. The highest market prices are always paid for wheat. The choicest brands of flour are constantly kept on hand, together with bran, shorts, shipstuff, and corn meal.

View: Newbern Mills

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Jersey County Page     Early Settlers
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