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Jersey County Page     Jerseyville History

Cooper’s History of Jerseyville, pp. 93-121

Attorneys, City and County Officials, Municipal Government, City Officers

Rev. Marshall M. Cooper, History of Jerseyville, Illinois 1822 to 1901, Jerseyville Republican Print, 1901, pp. 93-121. Not a complete transcription, there will be errors, typos.

The Jerseyville Bar

     Hon. Anthony L. Knapp was born in Middletown, Delaware county, New York, June 14, 1828. In 1849, at age 21, he was admitted to the bar, and first located in Jerseyville. At age 30 years he became a candidate for State Senator, accompanying Stephen A. Douglas and Abraham Lincoln in their memorable campaign. He was elected to the 37th Congres in 1861, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Gen. John A. McClernand. He nobly distinguished himself in both the 36th and 37th Congresses. Some of his speeches were used for campaign documents. On returning from Congress, Mr. Knapp took up again the practice of law in Chicago in 1865. In 1867 he moved to Springfield, Ill., where he formed a law partnership with James C. Robinson, which continued until his death, May 23, 1881.

     Hon. Robert M. Knapp was born in the city of New York, April 21, 1831. He was the son of Dr. Augustus R. Knapp, an eminent physician of Jerseyville. He came to Jerseyville with his father and mother at age 9 years, in 1840. Received his early education in the schools of Jerseyville, and at age 18 he entered the Kentucky State Military Institute, at Frankfort. While here at school he took the California gold fever, and we next see him traveling the overland route to California. Here he remained two years, successfully operating the gold mines. Returning from California he resumed his studies in the military institute. He was admitted to the bar in 1855, and began the practice of law in Jerseyville. On Dec. 26, 1855, he was married to Fannie A. Green, the daughter of Captain Stephen S. Green, who ran a line of boats from New York to Sing-Sing for several years. In 1867 Mr. Knapp was elected to the General Assembly, but decline to be a candidate for a second term. In 1871 he was elected Mayor of Jerseyville, and re-elected in 1872 and in 1876. He was elected to the 43rd Congress in 1872, and was re-nominated in 1874, and in 1876 was again re-nominated and elected. In the 43rd Congress he served on the committee on the revision of the laws. He addressed the Hosue on the “Civil Rights Bill,” and on the subject of Finance and Taxation. This latter speech was an earnest protest against legislation which favored the usurpation and monopolies of banks and bond-holders, to the detriment of the best interests of the people. He was a prominent man in the politics of this county and had an extensive influence. A few moments before 6 o’clock, June 14, 1889, he passed into eternity. He was a Knight Templar, and was buried with Masonic honors.

     Hon. Orville A. Snedeker was born in Jerseyville, Ill., June 11, 1848. He was the second son of Isaac and Caroline Snedeker, who came to Jerseyville in the spring of 1844 from New Jersey. His early education was obtained in the public schools of Jerseyville. Was a graduate of Shurtleff College, a graduate also of Bryant & Stratton’s Business College. Immediately he began the study of law in the law office of Judge R. A. King. He passed his examination and was admitted to the bar in 1871, and practiced successfully for many years in the lower and higher courts. In 1892 he was elected to the State Legislature, a member of 47th District, 39th General Assembly, and re-elected in 1894. He was Chairman of the Committee on Executive Department, also a member of the Committee on Judiciary, Judicial Department and Practice, State Institutions, Sanitary Affairs, Public Buildings and Grounds. He exerted his best efforts in carrying the Lovejoy monument appropriation for the monument at Alton, Ill. Championed the cause of the State Horticultural Society, by which an appropriation of $4,000 per annum was made, and it became a law. He was the author and introducer of the school house Flag Bill, No. 42, in the House, requiring school directors to furnish the schools with United States flags, but giving the pupils attending the right to determine when Old Glory shall be unfurled. Mr. Snedeker was a lawyer by profession, but carried on farming on a large scale and is reputed as having the largest orchard in the district, making 9,000 apple trees. The official vote of Nov. 6, 1894, shows in what esteem he was held by the people when he ran for Representative on the Republican ticket, in a district that was claimed by the opposite party by 1,319 majority. He ran 993 votes ahead of his ticket. August 12, 1873 he was married to Miss Emma Delzell, of Philadelphia. The fruits of this union were three children – Etta Caroline, Isaac D., and Frank S. Etta C. died in 1883, in about her fifth year. Mr. Snedeker, with his wife and two sons, was a member in good and regular standing in the First Baptist Church of Jerseyville. He died of a slow and lingering disease, spinal paralysis, but his immediate death was very sudden, being caused by pneumonia. In his death the church has lost a loyal and liberal member, the community an honest and useful citizen, his wife and children a devoted husband and father. He died September 4, 1897.

     Hon. George W. Herdman came to Jerseyville with his parents in 1854. Attended the common schools of his county until he entered Jerseyville Academy, taught by Rev. C. H. Foote, D.D., in the winters of 1857-58. In the spring of 1859 he taught his first school near the old poor farm, in what was then called “Hickory Log” school house. Taught continuously until 1865. In the fall of that year he entered the University of Louisville, Louisville, Ky., from which he graduated in the spring of 1867. Immediately after returning home he opened a law office and began the practice of his profession. In a few months he formed a partnership with Hon. Robert A. King and E. A. Pinero, under the firm name of King, Pinero & Herdman. In January Mr. Herdman bought out Mr. King’s interest in the office, King retiring, when his practice continued under the new form name of Pinero & Herdman. This partnership continued until the fall of 1869, when Mr. Pinero retired from the practice. From this date Mr. Herdman continued the practice of law alone until the fall of 1870, when he formed a co-partnership with Hon. Robert N. Knapp under the firm name of Knapp & Herdman. This firm carried on the practice until the fall of 1872, when the firm was dissolved. Again he continued the practice of law along, until he was elected Circuit Judge in 1882. Was City Attorney in 1868-69; was elected member of the Illinois Legislature in the fall of 1870. In 1876 Mr. Herdman was elected State Senator for four years. Served as Judge of Circuit Court from the spring of 1882 to July 1897, a period of fifteen years. He was member of the Board of Education of the city of Jerseyville for eight years, and for five years President of said Board. Since then he has practiced law along in Jerseyville up to the present date, 1901.

     Oscar B. Hamilton was born Jan. 31, 1839, at Otterville, Greene county, Illinois. Secured his education in the public schools at Grafton, at Hamilton Primary School at Otterville, and at the St. Louis Law School. He was admitted to the bar in St. Louis in 1870, in Supreme Court of Illinois in January, 1871, in United States Circuit Court, District of Kansas in 1888. He formed a partnership with Orville A. Snedeker and opened an office in Jerseyville, Ill., in March 1874. In 1883 this firm was dissolved, and he formed a partnership with Judge Allen M. Slaten under the firm name of Hamilton & Slaten, which continued until the fall of 1886, when Mr. Hamilton moved to Meade county, Kansas, and engaged in the business of banking and the practice of his profession. In January 1887 Mr. Hamilton presided as Judge Pro Tem. during a term of the District Court of Meade county, Kansas, and on several other occasions was called on the fill the same office. In August 1890 he returned to Jerseyville and entered into partnership with Otis D. Leach, under the firm name of Hamilton & Leach, which was dissolved in 1892, and a partnership with Leighton E. Brown, under the firm name of Hamilton & Brown, was formed, which was dissolved in 1893, and in 1894 he entered into partnership with his son, Paul M. Hamilton, which still continues. Mr. Hamilton was married October 25, 1860 to Eliza M. Brown, by Rev. B. B. Hamilton, and there have been eleven children born to them. Mr. Hamilton is President of the Jersey County Bar Association, on of the Trustees of the George Washington Educational Fund, a Director, and for several years has been an active promoter of Piasa Chautauqua Assembly, and has for many years been an officer in the M.E. Church, having been for nine years Superintendent of its Sunday School, besides many other positions of honor and trust he has heretofore filled.

     Hon. Theodore S. Chapman was educated at Madison University, at Hamilton, N.Y. Studied law for several years while teaching school at Otterville, Ill. Passed his examination before the Supreme Court at Springfield, Ill., Dec. 1874. Immediately began the practice of law at Jerseyville after being admitted to the bar, opening an office in the Hamilton building, southeast corner of the court house square, remaining in the same office for 25 years. During these 25 years he practiced alone, except the two years in which Mr. E. J. Vaughn was partner with him. Moved his office to the first floor, and there remains to the present time, 1901. Elected to the House of Representatives in 1884; also elected to the Senate in 1888. Appointed by Governor Tanner first Food Commissioner, July 1, 1899. Resigned, October 17, 1899. President of the George Washington Educational Fund for twelve years, and still so remains. Purchased the Abstract Records of Jersey county in 1893, and employed M. E. Bagley, who has kept records to the present time.

     Harry Warren Pogue, a graduate of the Jerseyville High School of the class of 1882. Began reading law in the office of Warren & Pogue in the fall of 1882. Passed his examination before the Appellate Court at Mt. Vernon, and admitted to the bar at the May term of the Supreme Court, May 1886. Elected State’s Attorney at a special election in the fall of 1887, caused by the resignation of A. A. Goodrich, who was elected County Judge to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Wm. H. Pogue, who was County Judge at the time of his death, September 21, 1887. Mr. Pogue was elected for two succeeding full terms, going out of that office December 1896. At present he occupies the same office building formerly occupied by his grandfather, Judge Geo. E. Warren, and his father, Wm. H. Pogue, attorneys, in the Vandevoort building on West Pearl street. His practice extends into the adjoining counties. Though not rich, yet has made a competency, with a beautiful home, are sufficient evidences of his success.

     Hon. Thomas Francis Ferns was born in Jerseyville, July 27, 1862, which place has always been his home. Graduated from the Jerseyville High School, May 16, 1882, and from the St. Louis Law School in May 1885. Admitted to practice law in Illinois in the spring of 1885. Was elected and held office of city attorney for three consecutive terms, from 1885 to 1891. Was elected three successive terms to the Illinois General Assembly, serving in the House of REpresentatives from 1891 to 1895 inclusive. Mr. Ferns was married June 26, 1895, to Miss Elizabeth C. White of Springfield, Ill. They have three children: Edith, Thomas F. Jr., and Stephen White. They live on the farm east of Jerseyville known as “Ferndale Place,” consisting of 240 acres. The farm is stocked with pedigreed Polled Durham cattle and Poland China hogs. Mr. Ferns continues in active practice of the law as well as managing his farm. In the spring of 1900 he became the owner of the Villinger Opera House, and thoroughly remodeled the entire building, stage and scenery, until Jerseyville can now boast of a first class opera house.

     Otis D. Leach was born in Illinois, October 4, 1860. A graduate of the Jerseyville High School, class of 1880. Immediately after graduating he became Principal of the Grafton public schools for three years. Was elected to the office of County Superintendent of public schools in the fall of 1886, and served one term. Passed his examination before the Appellate Court at Mt. Vernon in 1890, and was immediately admitted to the bar, and formed a law partnership with O. B. Hamilton in 1890. After three years, in 1893, this partnership was dissolved and Mr. Leach continued the practice of his profession alone in the Shephard building, South State street. In June 1900 he was appointed Attorney in Charge of Claims for the C. & A. Railroad Company, which position he holds at the present time, 1901. His present office and vaults are at the southwest corner of the court house square.

     Edward J. Vaughn, a graduate of the Jerseyville High School, class of 1888. Began the study of law in the office of T. S. Chapman, immediately after finishing his literary education in June 1888. Passed his examination before the Appellate Court at Springfield, Illinois, November 1890. Admitted to the bar January 1891. Began the practice of law in the office of T. S. Chapman, January 1891. Formed a law partnership with T. S. Chapman in 1894, and dissolved in 1896. Moved his office to the Bull building in October 1896, and has since followed his profession. He is a member of the Board of Education, and is now serving his third term. Was city attorney in 1895-96.

     Charles S. White, a graduate of the Jerseyville High School, class of 1886. Began the study of law in the office of Chapman & Vaughn in the spring of 1893. Passed his examination before the Appellate Court in February 1895. Admitted to the bar by the Supreme Court of Illinois, May 10, 1895. Began the practice of law in the office now occupied by him in the Chapman building February 1, 1896. Admitted to practice before the District Court of the United States, February 5, 1900. He is also Secretary and Attorney for the Jersey County Mutual Fire Insurance Company. Also a member of the Board of Education of Jerseyville Public Schools.

     H. P. Noble, a graduate of the Jerseyville High School, class of 1894. Passed his legal examination before the Appellate Court at Mt. Vernon, Ill., August 1896, and was admitted to practice by the Supreme Court of Ill., Nov. 19, 1896, and immediately began the practice of law in his present office in the Chapman building on Pearl St., where his office remains at the present time. Elected city attorney of Jerseyville, April 16, 1901.

     John J. Hughes completed his literary education in the Jerseyville High School. Began the study of law in 1893, at the Northwestern University Law School at Chicago. Passed his legal examination before the Appellate Court at Chicago, March 26, 1895, and admitted to the bar at same date. Immediately he began the practice of law in Chicago in 1895. Came to Jerseyville in 1896, and opened a law office at No. 7, South State street, where he has continued the practice of his profession to the present time.

     George M. Seago, a graduate of the Jerseyville High School, class of 1891. Admitted to the bar in 1894, opening an office in Jerseyville immediately after being admitted. In 1899 he was elected to the office of city attorney without opposition. In the fall of 1900 he was elected State’s Attorney. He is at present Secretary of the Jerseyville Building and Loan Association, with offices in the Carlin building.

     Paul M. Hamilton was born December 18, 1872, at Otterville, Jersey county. Son of Oscar B. and Eliza M. Hamilton. Received his education at the Jerseyville High School. Passed his examination at Springfield, Illinois, in May 1895, and was admitted to the bar in June 1895, and immediately formed a law partnership with his father, O. B. Hamilton, and entered the practice of law, under the firm name of Hamilton & Hamilton. Office over the National Bank, corner of State and Pearl streets. In 1901 he was appointed attorney in the Claims Department of the Chicago & Alton R.R. Served as Secretary of the Piasa Chautauqua Assembly for the years 1900 and 1901.

     Adams Augustus Goodrich was born at Jerseyville, Jan. 8, 1849. The son of Henry O. and Jane A. (Knapp) Goodrich. After attending the public schools he took a course in the West Point Military Academy. He was admitted to the bar in Jan. 1873, and began the practice of law in Jerseyville; held the office of city attorney, and re-elected in 1880 and 1884. In 1887 he was elected County Judge to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Wm. H. Pogue. Judge Goodrich is now a prominent attorney in the city of Chicago, being associated with Judge Vincent of that city.

     Joseph S. Carr was born at St. Charles, Mo. in 1832. His father, John Carr, was murdered in the City Hotel, St. Louis, in 1840. The subject of this sketch graduated from the St. Charles College, and in 1869 came to Illinois, locating at Kane, Greene county. In 1883 he came to Jerseyville where he practiced his profession until his death in 1896.

     Hon. T. J. Selby was admitted to the bar in 1869. In connection with his profession, held the offices of sheriff and county clerk. In 1876 he formed a partnership with E. A. Pinero which continued until he moved to Nebraska in 1879. After practicing for some years in the West, he returned and located at Hardin, Calhoun County, where he held the office of State’s Attorney for three terms, and in 1900 was elected to Congress on the democratic ticket from the 16th district. While a resident of Jerseyville, Mr. Selby served three terms as mayor.

     Judge Allen M. Slaten was born July 28, 1842 in Jersey County. Received his early education in the public schools of his county. Entered McKendree College in the fall of 1858, and studied there two years. Graduated at Jones’ Commercial College in 1862. Following boating on the Mississippi river from spring of 1862 to 1866. He married Miss Addie VanDewater Jan. 24, 1866. By this union were born eight children, four of whom still survive: Alvertie, wife of Thos. A. Case, former Co. Supt. of Public Schools; Addie Louise, wife of George H. Senior; Charles W.; and Emma M. Slaten, youngest, at home. After this period he was engaged in farming for two years. He next engaged in the mercantile business in Otterville for about two years. Began the study of law in the office of J. W. and B. F. Slaten in 1873, and afterwards with Judge W. G. Kase in St. Louis, Mo. He passed his examination and was admitted to the bar in January 1876, and at once began the practice of his profession in Jerseyville. Was elected County Judge of Jersey County at the general election of 1890, no opposition. Was re-elected in 1894, and served one term. Was again re-elected for third term in 1898, and is the present incumbent.

First Court House

     The first court house built in Jerseyville was in 1840, by subscriptions from the people. It was originally 40 feet square. Aaron Rue and Payten C. Walker did the carpenter work, and Peter Perrine did the brick work. It was built on the block given by Lott & Daly to the town for a public square, and the trustees of the town deeded it to the county for a public building.
     In 1862 an addition on the north side was built, 16 x 30 feet in size, for jail purposes. On the morning of January 6, 1884, a very cold winter morning, it burned up and some four inmates perished. “History of Greene and Jersey Counties,” page 100, gives details of this event.

New Court House

     At a meeting of the Board of Supervisors of Jersey County, March 2, 1892, they issued an order to the electors of said county to issue forty thousand dollars in County bonds for the purpose of building a new court house. Submitted at the general election in November 1892, it carried by a majority of the legal votes cast on the proposition.
     The building committee was composed of the following: P. D. Cheney, James Stirratt, Wm. Goshorn, C. P. Stafford and Joseph Knight. April 11, 1893, the contract for building the court house was let to F. W. Menke, of Quincy, Ill.
     The corner stone of the new court house was laid July 4, 1893. The building committee accepted the new court house from the hand of Mr. Menke, May 5, 1894, and they made report to the Board of Supervisors, June 5, 1894. The amount paid the contractor, F. W. Menke, was $40,411.85.
     The building is solidly constructed of Grafton stone, and is a very beautiful and imposting structure. Its height from the ground to the top of the statue is 124 1/2 feet, length 90 feet, width 71 feet. In the basement are six rooms; on the lower floor are six rooms; on the second floor are eight rooms. It contains four fire-proof vaults, each 6 x 26 feet, making in all about 9,360 cubic feet of vault room.

Jersey County Officials

     County Clerks: Richard Graham, 1839-1843; George W. Lowder, 1843-1857; Andrew Jackson, 1857-1869; Thomas J. Selby, 1869-1877; James Eads, 1877-1885; D. J. Murphy, 1885-1898; J. C. McGrath, 1898 to present, present incumbent.

Sheriffs of Jersey County

     The first sheriff of Jersey county was John N. English, Sr., elected at the presidential election of 1840. John N. English, Sr., and Samuel T. Kendall were the nominees. English’s majority was one vote.
     Perley Silloway succeeded Mr. English in 1842. His majority over Murray Cheney and Adam Waggoner was 55. Perley Silloway was again elected in the August election of 1844. His majority over Isaac Harbert and Delevan D. Wilcox was 125.
     In 1846 Jonathan Plowman was elected, his majority over Silloway, Snedeker and John Darneille was 58. In 1848 Jonathan Plowman was again elected, his majority over Right Casey and Josiah Frenc was 98.
     In 1850 Capt. Murray Cheney was the incumbent.
     In 1852 J. M. Hurd was elected by a majority of 4 over Plowman.
     In 1854 Jonathan Plowman was elected by a majority of 25 over John F. Smith.
     In 1856 Benjamin Wedding was elected by a plurality of 204 votes over Bowman and Hurd.
     In 1858 Charles Bowman was elected by a majority of 18 votes over John L. Johnson.
     In 1860 Wm. H. Cummings was elected by a majority bo 154 over Wedding.
     In 1862 Charles H. Bowman was elected by a plurality of 647 votes over Adam Clendenin.
     In 1864 T. J. Selby was elected by a majority of 644 votes over Billings and Craig. Selby received 1,437 votes, Billings 121, Craig 793.
     In 1866 Charles H. Bowman received a plurality of 368 over Massey and Keeley.
     In 1868 James H. Belt received 481 votes over Dougherty and McKinney.
     In 1870 Stephen H. Bowman was elected over John C. Darby by a plurality of 165 votes.
     In 1872 Charles H. Bowman was elected, but died January 6, 1873.
     On February 15, 1873, Stephen H. Bowman was, at a special election, elected to fill out the unexpired term of Charles H. Bowman.
     In 1874 A. H. Barrett was elected over Allen and Calhoun by a majority of 151.
     In 1876 James M. Young was elected by a plurality vote of 625 over A. H. Barrett. In 1878 James M. Young succeeded himself by a majority of 1,140 votes over Ford, McBride and Vinson.
     In 1880 Henry C. Massey defeated Chas. C. Buzby by 505 votes.
     In 1882 Charles S. Frost received 528 votes over Thos. F. Hansell. (First man on four year term)
     In 1886 Jesse Kerzy Cadwallader was elected by a plurality of 64 votes over Fitzgibbons.
     In 1890 Cosmos Keller was elected by a majority of 765 votes over Jestus A. Post.
     In 1894 A. R. Chappell was elected by a plurality of 100 over B. F. Calhoun.
     In 1898 Cosmos Keller was elected, defeating D. P. Noble by 266 votes.

Circuit Clerks

     The first circuit clerk of Jersey county was Robert L. Hill, father of Oscar Hill. He served from 1839 to 1849. Thomas L. McGill, from 1849 to 1860; Marcus E. Bagley, from 1860 to 1880; Jesse I. McGready, from 1880 to 1888; Ludovic Laurent, from 1888 to present.

Judges of Probate Court

     Joseph G. Scott, 1839 to 1847; J. M. Hurd, 1847 to 1849; George E. Warren, senior, 1849 to 1857; O. P. Powell, 1857 to 1861; J. M. Hurd, 1861 to 1872; Robert A. King, 1872 to 1882; Wm. H. Pogue, 1882 to 1887; A. A. Goodrich, 1887 to 1890; A. M. Slaten, 1890 to present time, 1901.

Treasurers and Assessors

     C. Easell was elected in 1843 and served four years; Soloman Calhoun was elected Sept. 9, 1847, and served one term; Solomon Calhoun was re-elected Nov. 8, 1853, by a majority of 935 over H. N. Belt, and served one term; Solomon Calhoun was again re-elected, Nov. 1855 and served one term; John F. Smith was elected Nov. 8, 1859, by a majority of 364 over E. M. Smith; John F. Smith was again elected by a majority of 382 over J. T. Ross; John F. Smith again re-elected by a majority of 510 over Harley Hayes; James Young was elected November 1870 by a majority of 436 over over James Burke.

County Treasurers

     James M. Young, at a June election, 1873, was elected by a majority of 528 over H. N. Belt; John P. Stout was elected by a plurality of 48 votes over Thos. O’Donnel, Patrick Conway and M. C. Stanley; Thomas O’Donnell was elected in 1877 by a plurality of 76 votes over Nelson and Stout; 1879 Thomas O’Donnell elected to the office, 306 majority over J. D. Darby and W. H. H. West; John A. Shephard elected Jan. 1880, a special election necessary by the death of Thomas O’Donnell. He served six years, until 1886; Robert Newton elected in 1886, served four years; John A. Shephard again elected and served four years; Cosmos Keller elected 1894, served four years; Richared Kiely elected 1898, present incumbent.

School Commissioners

     James Harrott was the first school commissioner, being elected in 1843; B. B. Hamilton was the second elected in 1847, and served one year to 1848; Hiram Bridges elected at regular election in 1848, by 89 majority over Robert M. Knapp; Hiram Bridges again elected in 1849, by a majority of 469 over Elihu J. Palmer; Hiram Bridges is again re-elected in 1851 by a plurality of 221 votes over Elihu J. Palmer; Hiram Bridges again re-elected in 1853, no opposition; H. H. Howard elected in 1857, by a majority of 48 over J. O. Hamilton, served until 1859, when William J. Herdman was elected, first County Superintendent.

County Superintendents of Schools

     Wm. J. Herdman was the first county superintendent of schools, being elected in the fall of 1859, and held the office uninterruptedly until 1868, nine years. Previous to Mr. Herdman, they were called county commissioners. The next in office was C. H. Knapp, elected in 1868 and served for six years; W. H. Lynn was the next incumbent to this office, elected in the fall of 1873, re-elected in 1875, serving four years; Lott Pennington elected in 1877, held the office until succeeded in 1886; Otis D. Leach elected in fall of 1886, served one term; Richard Kiely served from 1890 to 1894; Thomas A. Case elected in 1894 and served one term; James W. Roberts, present incumbent, elected in the fall of 1898.
     Mr. Roberts was born in Pike county, Illinois, October 13, 1854, a graduate of the Pittsfield High School, class of 1873. Began teaching immediately after graduation in the fall of 1873, and has almost exclusively followed his profession of teaching to the present time. Elected to the office of County Superintendent of public schools in the election of 1898.

State’s Attorneys

     In 1870 W. H. Pogue was appointed for two years, elected in 1872 for a full term of four years; 1876 Wm. M. Jackson elected for term of four years, resigned in fall of 1878; 1878 A. A. Goodrich elected to fill vacancy of Wm. M. Jackson, 1880 Goodrich elected for a full term, 1884 Goodrich re-elected for a full term, 1887 Goodrich resigned; Wm. Pogue completed Goodrich’s unexpired term; 1888 H. W. Pogue elected for full term of four years, re-elected in 1892; 1896 M. J. Dolan served to 1900; 1900 George M. Seago, present incumbent.

County Surveyors

     James A. Potts was the first elected county surveyor of Jersey county, elected in 1843, served to 1847; Job Collins elected in 1847, served to 1849; James A. Potts again elected by a majority of 696 over George Burke in 1849; James A. Potts re-elected in 1851 by a majority of 445 over Hummerlaw, served until 1853; Levi P. McNeil elected in 1853, by a majority of 43 over James A. Potts; Henry M. Chase elected in 1857 by a majority of 217 over Josiah H. White; 1859 Josiah H. White elected over G. I. Foster by a majority of four votes; George I. Foster elected in 1861 by a majority of 673 over H. M. Chase; 1867 George I. Foster again elected by a majority of 271 over Henry D. Edwards; 1869, George I. Foster again elected by a majority of 312 over Linus Humiston; Wm. L. West elected in 1870 by a majority of 250 over Henry D. Edwards; George I. Foster elected 1874 by a majority of 20 over Henry D. Edwards; D. J. Murphy elected 1879 by a majority of 249 over Edwards and Foster; 1884 D. J. Murphy re-elected by a majority of 729 over Edwards and Kingsley; 1886 Cornelius Roach elected to fill unexpired term of D. J. Murphy, resigning to accept the office of county clerk, to which he was elected in 1886; Albert W. Newton elected in 1888, served ten years, to 1898, when he resigned; Walter Hansell appointed to fill out the unexpired term of Mr. Newton; 1900 Walter Hansell elected and is present incumbent.

County Coroners

     The first coroner of Jersey county was Nelson R. Lurton, elected at a special election in 1839. Second coroner was A. G. Miner, elected in 1840. John Brinton, 1842-1846; George Hoffman, 1846-1848; William Lay, 1848-1852; William Williams, 1852-1854; Benjamin Wedding, 1854-1856; C. P. Stafford, 1855-1858; Lewis Johnson, 1858-1862; James L. Beirne, 1862-1864; F. W. Besterfeldt, 1864-1866; Lewis Johnson, 1866-1868; Sidney Noble, 1868-1870; E. L. Harriott, 1870-1874; Herman Roesch, 1874-1876; Dr. John S. Williams, 1876-1880; Dr. Caleb Du Hadway, 1880-1884; Dr. E. L. Barry, 1884-1888; Dr. Wesley Park, 1888-1892; Dr. James A. Flautt, 1892-’90; Dr. J. S. Williams, 1900 to present.

Mnicipal Government

     Jerseyville became an incorporated town July 21, 1837. The officers were: John W. Lott, president; E. M. Daly, clerk; Samuel L. McGill, George W. Collens and Richard Graham, board of trustees. Jerseyville became an incorporated city February 21, 1867. The following were the first officers: Marcus E. Bagley, mayor; George H. Jackson, clerk; James S. Daniels, marshal; King & Pinero, attorneys; N. Wallace, constable; Andrew Jackson, John L. White, George Egelhoff and James S. Blythe, aldermen.
     In 1890 the government census gave the population of Jerseyville as 3,207; in 1900 3,517, divided as follows: 1st Ward, 159; 2nd Ward, 1,046; 3rd Ward, 766; 4th Ward, 746.
     The following are its present officers (1901): George D. Locke, mayor; Albert H. Foster, clerk; Walter E. Carlin, treasurer; H. P. Noble, attorney; W. H. Schroeder, police magistrate, who is also city marshal; aldermen: 1st Ward, J. J. Wiseman, H. S. Daniels; 2nd Ward, John G. Schwarz, Paul Nitschke; 3rd Ward, E. A. R. Myers, Wm. F. Fahey; 4th Ward, Peter A. Bowler, W. H. H. West, Jr.
     The Justices of the Peace and constables whose business is chiefly confined to the city, though elected for the township are: Justices – J. C. Ross, W. H. Schroeder, J. G. Erwin, A. H. Quinn; Constables – David McReynolds, John W. Hayes, Wharton English, John J. Ballard.

Justices of the Peace

     J. G. Erwin occupies an office over H. S. Daniel’s grocery store; received his first commission from Governor Joseph W. Fifer in 1892, to fill the vacancy of C. B. Eaton, resigned; his second commission was from Governor John P. Altgeld, April 1, 1893; his third commission was issued and signed by Gov. John R. Tanner in 1897; his fourth commission was issued and signed by Governor Richard Yates in 1901. Also buys and sells real estate, makes collections, and negotiates loans. Mr. Erwin’s repeated commissions, and his continuance in office settle the question of his justice and efficiency in office.

     J. C. Ross received his first commission from Governor John R. Tanner, May 1, 1897; his second commission from Gov. Richard Yates, May 1, 1901. Mr. Ross is also an agent for the nursery of Schultz Bros., of Calhoun county, Illinois. Mr. Ross is now among our oldest and most honored citizens, having been a resident of Jersey county and Jerseyville over 63 years. Born in Summerset county, N.J., March 20, 1836. Came to Jerseyville, July 1839.

     Wm. H. Schroeder, J.P. and City Marshall. Office on Pearl street over Marston & Halliday’s store. Received his first commission from Gov. John P. Altgeld, May 1, 1893; received his second commission from Gov. John R. Tanner, May 1, 1897; his third commission from Gov. Richard Yates, May 1, 1901.

     Anthony H. Quinn was born in California, Mo., May 21, 1858. Received his first commission from Gov. Richard Yates, May 6, 1901. Office in court house.

     John W. Hayes, Constable, first elected constable of Jersey township in 1884, and served four years. Retired until 1895 and was again elected to fill a vacancy of Thomas Callaway, and again re-elected in 1897 four years; again re-elected for four years in the spring of 1901, is at present filling his office.

City Officers

1867: Marcus E. Bagley, Mayor; George H. Jackson, Clerk; James S. Daniels, Marshal; N. Wallace (rs’d), James McKinney, Constable; King & Pinero, Attorney; Aldermen: Andrew Jackson, John L. White, Geo. Egelhoff, James S. Blythe.

1868: Henry O. Goodrich, Mayor; Geo. H. Jackson, Clerk; James S. Daniels, Marshal; John C. Murphy, Constable; Pinero & Herdman, Attorney; Alderman: William Embly, Thos. J. Selby, Geo. Egelhoff, P. Kennedy.

1869: Henry O. Goodrich, Mayor; Morris R. Locke, Clerk; James S. Daniels, Marshal; John C. Murphy, Constable; Robert Sayers, Attorney; Aldermen: Smith M. Titus, Wm. Embly, John E. VanPelt, Thos. J. Selby, Peter Dolan, E. L. H. Barry, Geo. Schwarz, William Shephard.

1870: Benjamin Wedding, Mayor; Wm. J. Herdman, Clerk; A. D. Erwin, Marshal; John E. Hankey, Constable; J. W. Merrill, Attorney; Aldermen: Ludlow P. Squier, Henry C. Massey, David R. Herdman, Thomas J. Selby, Caleb Du Hadway, Peter Dolan, George Egelhoff, Louis Grosjean.

1871: Robert M. Knapp, Mayor; Joseph G. Marston, Clerk; James S. Blythe, Marshal; John Fox, Constable; H. Calkins, Attorney; Aldermen: Clarence M. Hamilton, Geo. I. Foster, Samuel Hess, Geo. S. Rue, Joshua Allen, Ezekiel Davidson, Wallace Leigh, James S. Daniels.

1872: Robert M. Knapp, Mayor; George H. Jackson, Clerk; James McKinney, Marshal; James W. Calhoun, Constable; H. Calkins, Attorney; Aldermen: Andrew Jackson, John E. Sanford, John M. Smith, O. M. Paris, E. L. H. Barry, R. A. King, John W. Vinson, James A. Locke.

1873: John E. Van Pelt, Mayor; George H. Jackson, Clerk; W. H. Anderson, Marshal; George S. Utt, Constable; Attorney, none appointed; Aldermen: Clarence M. Hamilton, J. C. Tack, N. F. Smith, Robert Newton, E. O. Hartwick, Peter Dolan, Thomas Erwin, Wallace Leigh.

1874: Henry O. Goodrich, Mayor; Geo. H. Jackson, Clerk; John E. Sanford, Marshal; Geo. M. Remer, Constable; Adams A. Goodrich, Attorney; Aldermen: J. Knox Smith, David Houghtlin, James M. Young, F. X. Schattgen, Geo. Egelhoff, Wm. Embly, R. C. Gledhill, James A. Barr.

1875: George E. Warren, Mayor; C. W. Tietsort, Clerk; James S. Blythe, Marshal; Hiram Leonard, Constable; O. B. Hamilton, Attorney; Aldermen: Clarence M. Hamilton, W. S. Bowman, Joseph M. Page, L. M. Cutting, Peter Dolan, W. Pittinger, C. T. Edee, R. C. Gledhill.

1876: Robert M. Knapp, Mayor; Henry Nevius, Clerk; Robert H. Whyte, Marshal; John Fox, Constable; Thos. J. Selby, Attorney; Aldermen: Stephen H. Bowman, Wm. Hall, James M. Young, L. J. Cassavant, Caleb Du Hadway, E. L. H. Barry, J. S. Daniels (resigned), James S. Blythe.

1877: Thos. J. Selby, Mayor; Henry Nevius, Clerk; R. H. Whyte (resigned), J. M. Page, Marshal; Smith Hill (resigned), John Powell, Constable; P. Kennedy, Attorney; Aldermen: Stephen H. Bowman, Walter E. Carlin, James M. Young, L. J. Cassavant, Caleb Du Hadway, E. L. H. Barry, Henry D. Field, John A. Shephard.

1878: Thomas J. Selby, Mayor; W. H. Callender, Clerk; Joseph M. Page, Marshal; J. S. Malott, Constable; Wm. M. Jackson (resigned), W. H. Pogue, Attorney; Aldermen: Marcus E. Bagley, Wallace Leigh, N. F. Smith, John W. Vinson, E. L. H. Barry, A. Holnabck, R. C. Gledhill, H. O. Goodrich.

1879: Jesse I. McGready, Mayor; James R. Colean, Clerk; Joseph M. Page, Marshal; Smith M. Titus, Constable; P. Kennedy, Attorney; Aldermen: Stephen H. Bowman, James M. Young, John Fox, John Sweeney, A. Holnback, E. L. H. Barry, John A. Shephard, Henry D. Field.

1880: Jesse I. McGready, Mayor; James R. Colean, Clerk; Joseph M. Page, Marshal; Smith M. Titus, Constable; Attorney, none appointed; Aldermen: Stephen H. Bowman, C. W. Enos, John Fox, John Sweeney, Charles Jacobs, A. Holnback, J. A. Shephard, Henry D. Field (resigned), George W. Ely.

1881: Jesse I. McGready, Mayor; Joseph M. Page, Clerk; Henry Whyte, Marshal; Smith M. Titus, Constable; Adams A. Goodrich, Attorney; Aldermen: A. B. Hall, W. H. Lynn, R. N. McClure, John Wiley, Henry Nevius, Charles Jacobs, Walter E. Carlin, geo. W. Ely.

1882: Jesse I. McGready, Mayor; Joseph M. Page, Clerk; Henry Whyte, Marshal; Constable, none appointed; Attorney, none appointed; Aldermen: R. A. King, A. H. Bell, Caleb Du Hadway, John Fox, Wm. Embly, Wm. Eads, Walter E. Carlin, John A. Shephard.

1883: E. L. H. Barry, Mayor; Joseph M. Page, Clerk; Henry Whyte, Marshal; Adams A. Goodrich, Attorney; Aldermen: S. H. Bowman, A. K. VanHorne, John Fox, Caleb Du Handway, Henry Nevius, Ludovic Laurent, James S. Daniels, John A. Shephard.

1883: Stephen H. Bowman, Mayor; J. M. Page, Clerk; Henry Whyte, Marshal; James R. Colean, Treasurer; R. B. English, Attorney; Aldermen: George M. Eaton, A. K. VanHorne, John Fox, Caleb Du Hadway, Geo. Egelhoff, Henry Nevius, C. W. Enos, James S. Daniels.

The city was organized under the General Law, April 11, 1883, which explains the two sets of officers for that year.

1884: Stephen H. Bowman, Mayor; J. M. Page, Clerk; Henry Whyte, Marshal; James R. Colean, Treasurer; R. B. English (resigned), A. M. Slaten; Aldermen: George M. Eaton, John Fox, George Egelhoff, James S. Daniels, A K. VanHorne, Fred J. Bertman, Henry Nevius, John A. Shephard.

1885: E. L. H. Barry, Mayor; William Hanley, Clerk; Henry Whyte, Marshal; Fred Jacobs, Treasurer; T. F. Ferns, Attorney; Aldermen: A. K. VanHorne, Fred J. Bertman, Henry Nevius, John A. Shephard, George M. Eaton, John Fox, George Egelhoff, James S. Daniels.

1886: E. L. H. Barry, Mayor; William Hanley, Clerk; Henry Whyte, Marshal; Fred Jacobs, Treasurer; T. F. Ferns, Attorney; Aldermen: George M. Eaton, John Fox, George Egelhoff, James S. Daniels, John H. Richards, Fred J. Bertman, W. R. Seago, John A. Shephard.

1887: Joseph M. Page, Mayor; T. W. Butler, Clerk: Henry Whyte, Marshal; G. R. Smith, Treasurer; T. F. Ferns, Attorney; Aldermen: Geo. M. Eaton, L. S. Hansell, Edward Slattery, James S. Daniels, John H. Richards, Fred J. Bertman, W. R. Seago, John A. Shephard.

1888: Joseph M. Page, Mayor; T. W. Butler, Clerk: Henry Whyte, Marshal; G. R. Smith, Treasurer; T. F. Ferns, Attorney; Aldermen: Geo. M. Eaton, L. S. Hansell, Edward Slattery, James S. Daniels, J. S. Holmes, Fred J. Bertman, Charles Neumeyer, John A. Shephard.

1889: Joseph M. Page, Mayor; T. W. Butler, Clerk: Henry Whyte, Marshal; Arch F. Ely, Treasurer; T. F. Ferns, Attorney; Aldermen: Geo. M. Eaton, L. S. Hansell, Wm. Embly, James S. Daniels, J. S. Holmes, Fred J. Bertman, Chas. Neumeyer, John A. Shephard.

1890: Joseph M. Page, Mayor; T. W. Butler, Clerk: Henry Whyte, Marshal; Arch F. Ely, Treasurer; T. F. Ferns, Attorney (resigned); Aldermen: Geo. M. Eaton, L. S. Hansell, Wm. Embly, James S. Daniels, Wm. Pittman, F. J. Bertman, Charles Neumeyer, S. H. Bowman.

1891: James S. Daniels, Mayor; Joseph O’Loughlin, Clerk; Henry Whyte, Marshal; H. A. Shephard, Treasurer; Joseph S. Carr, Attorney; Aldermen: Chas. Neumeyer, S. H. Bowman, F. J. Bertman, Wm. Pittman, Caleb Du Hadway, Wm. Embly, Jas. Ross, J. A. Shephard.

1892: James S. Daniels (deceased), Caleb Du Hadway, Mayor; Joseph O’Loughlin, Clerk; Henry Whyte, Marshal; H. A. Shephard, Treasurer; Joseph S. Carr, Attorney; Aldermen: J. A. Shephard, James Ross, Wm. Embly, Caleb Du Hadway, Harry B. Hill, L. S. Hansell, Henry Nevius, S. H. Bowman.

1893: H. A. Shephard, Mayor; Joseph O’Loughlin, Clerk; John Powell, Marshal; Arch F. Ely, Treasurer; Joseph Carr, Attorney; Aldermen: H. B. Hill, J. C. Ross, F. J. Bertman, L. S. Hansell, Henry Nevius, Fred Jacobs, S. H. Bowman, George Ely.

1894: H. A. Shephard, Mayor; Joseph O’Loughlin, Clerk; W. R. Seago, Marshal; Arch F. Ely, Treasurer; J. S. Carr, Attorney; Aldermen: J. C. Ross, H. B. Hill, Fred Jacobs, Geo. Ely, Wm. Nally, W. H. Houghtlin, George Holnback, Jacob Wagner.

1895: H. A. Shephard, Mayor; Joseph O’Loughlin, Clerk; W. R. Seago, Marshal; H. S. Daniels, Treasurer; Ed. J. Vaughn, Attorney; J. G. Erwin (failed to qualify), Police Magistrate; Aldermen. W. S. Pittman, W. P. Richards, Fred Jacobs, Frank Roerig, H. B. Hill, Geo. Holnback, Jacob Wagner, W. H. Houghtlin.

1896: H. A. Shephard, Mayor; Joseph O’Loughlin, Clerk; W. R. Seago, Marshal; H. S. Daniels, Treasurer; Ed. J. Vaughn, Attorney; George D. Locke (failed to qualify), Police Magistrate; Aldermen: Harry B. Hill, John H. Crawford, Geo. Holnback, S. H. Bowman, W. S. Pittman, W. P. Richards, Fred Jacobs, Frank Roerig.

1897: H. A. Shephard, Mayor; Augustus Embly, Clerk; W. R. Seago, Marshal; Arch F. Ely, Treasurer; Eugene Hale, Attorney; Thomas O’Loughlin, Police Magistrate; Aldermen: Harry B. Hill, John H. Crawford, Geo. Holnback, S. H. Bowman, J. J. Wiseman, John Horn, J. F. O’Loughlin, W. H. Noble.

1898: H. A. Shephard, Mayor; Augustus Embly, Clerk; Henry Whyte, Marshal; Arch F. Ely, Treasurer; Eugene Hale, Attorney; Aldermen: J. G. Marston, J. J. Wiseman, John HOrn, J. C. Ross, J. F. O’Loughlin, Thos. Murphy, G. R. Smith, W. H. Noble.

1899: H. A. Shephard, Mayor; Augustus Embly, Clerk; Henry Whyte, Marshal; M. B. Hill, Treasurer; George M. Seago, Attorney; J. G. Erwin, Police Magistrate; Aldermen: H. S. Daniels, J. J. Wiseman, John Christy, J. C. Ross, J. F. O’Loughlin, Thos. Murphy, G. R. Smith, George W. Ware.

1900: H. A. Shephard, Mayor; Augustus Embly, Clerk; Henry Whyte, Marshal; M. B. Hill, Treasurer; George M. Seago, Attorney; John J. Hughes, Police Magistrate; Aldermen: H. S. Daniels, J. J. Wiseman, John Christy, J. F. O’Loughlin, E. A. Myers, George D. Locke, George W. Ware.

1901: G. D. Locke, Mayor; Albert H. Foster, Clerk; W. H. Schroeder, Marshal; W. E. Carlin, Treasurer; H. P. Noble, Attorney; Aldermen: H. S. Daniels, J. J. Wiseman, John G. Schwarz, Paul Nitschke, E. A. Meyers, Wm. Fahey, P. A. Bowler, W. H. West, Jr.

Jersey County Page     Jerseyville History