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Jersey County Page     Jersey County History

Jersey Township

From History of Greene and Jersey Counties, Illinois, Springfield, IL: Continental Historical Co., 1885, pp. 470 – 550. There will be typographical errors.

Early Settlement

     It is more than likely that the first attempt at settlement within the limits of Jersey county was made in Jersey township. Authentic evidence is given that in the fall of 1815, six men, Daniel Allen and his sons, Daniel Jr., James and John, and James and Paul Harriford came to this locality. They were looking for homes, and on coming to the Macoupin creek, opposite, or nearly so, to the mouth of Taylor’s branch, settled on Sec. 13, T9, R11, or in what is now known as the ‘panhandle.’ Here they put up cabins, and clearing some land, in the summer of 1816 raised a crop of corn. In the fall of that year the Allens moved a short distance west, thus carrying them into Greene county, where their subsequent career may be followed. The Harriford’s, brothers of Mrs. John Huitt, returned to Chariton, Mo., in time to witness her marriage in 1818.
     The next to appear in this locality was John Ballard, who first came to the county in 1822. He settled on the southeast quarter of Sec. 30, T8, R11, in what is now Jersey township. In 1823 he sold out to John Falkner, and then moved to the present site of Jerseyville.
     John Falkner bought the improvement of John Ballard, on the southeast quarter of Sec. 30, 8-11, in 1823, and settled on it. He was frozen to death in 1825, while coming from mill. His brother James afterward moved to the present site of Jerseyville, an built the old ‘Red House,’ the second in that place.
     In 1824 John Nelson English came to Jersey county, and has been a resident ever since. He was the first sheriff of this county, and hs filled a prominent place in the general assembly of the state.
     Robert Latham settled in what is now Jersey county in 1825. In 1829 he enterd a piece of land in Jersey township, and settled thereon. He was born in Rowan county, N.C. in 1793, and came to Illinois in 1820.
     Jonathan E. Cooper came to the county of Jersey in Nov. 1829. The greater part of his time for the first year was spent in Carrollton, but in 1832 he enterd the farm where he now lives, in Jersey township, and has been identified with this county ever since.
     Captain Jonathan E. Cooper is a native of Henry county, Ky., born Jan. 5, 1807. His father, Jonathan Cooper, was a native of Maryland, and one of the early settlers of the ‘dark and bloody ground.’ He was among the pioneer settlers with Daniel Boone, with whom he frequently hunted Indians, and he was also a soldier in the Revolutionary war. He married his first wife, Eleanor Jones, in Pennsylvania, and reared six children. His second marriage occured in Shelby county, Ky., to Eleanor English, and by this union 12 children were born, of whom the subject of the sketch is the eldest son, and second child. In 1835 he moved to Illinois, and settled on a farm four miles southwest of Jerseyville, where he died in Aug. 1845. Mrs. Cooper survived his death 11 years. Jonathan E. Cooper received his education in the schools of his native state, and spent most of his time at home on the farm until reaching the age of 23 years, and in Nov. 1829, after a horse-back trip of 13 days, landed within the present limits of Jersey county, Ill. He spent nearly the first winter clerking in the store of his uncle, L. N. English, of Carrollton. The next year he worked on a farm. On the breaking out of the Black Hawk war, he enlisted in Captain Carlin’s (afterward Governor Carlin) company, was elected as its orderly sergeant, and served one year under Carlin. The next year, 1832, he served in Captain Patterson’s company, and a portion of the year was detailed as quartermaster; participated in the battles of the Wisconsin and Mississippi, and after peace was declared, received an honorable discharge. In Oct. 1832, Captain Cooper entered the land on which he now resides, two and a half miles southwest of Jerseyville. In 1832 he was commissioned captain of militia by Gov. Reynolds. When he came to Illinois, his wealth consisted of a horse and three dollars in money. After entering his land, he soon set about improvement, and commenced making a home. Being one of the pioneers, he had many hardships and inconveniences to encounter. May 19, 1836 he was married to Miriam F. Turner, nee French, daughter of Nicholas and Anna French. She was born in Rockingham county, N.H. The captain and his bride moved into their cabin on Aug. 1, 1836, and Captain Cooper still resides on the identical spot. Mrs. Cooper died in June 1873. They reared two adopted children: Marshall M. Cooper, now a Presbyterian minister, and at the present writing, located at Deep River, Iowa; and Mary, the wife of N. I. Massy, resides in Colorado. On Dec. 3, 1879, Captain Cooper was married to Sarah C. Johnson, nee Gillham, a native of Illinois, having been born in Madison county. Politically, Captain Cooper is a democrat, he having become a member of that party in early life, his first vote having been cast for General Jackson, but has never desired to hold public office. Religiously, he united with the Baptist church at Kane, Greene county, in 1839, and he and his wife wre among the original members of the Baptist society at Jerseyville. The first year of the organization of this society, he was elected to the responsible position of deacon, which he has since retained. Deacon Cooper is among that class of noble-hearted citizens whom all love and respect. Strict integrity and honesty of purpose mark all his dealings. He is a close observer of passing events, and to him is due the credit of preserving much of the early history of Jersey county.
     William Moore settled about six miles south of Jerseyville in 1829, where he remained until 1831, when he made a permanent settlement in Jersey township on section 20. This he made his residence until the winter of 1835-36, when he was frozen to death returning from mill, being on foot, having sent his team on ahead with his son.
     Amos Pruitt settled in this township in 1829 on section 19, but in 1832 disposed of his farm to Milo Bennett, and moved to a place northwest of the present town of Fidelity. He was a member of the first county commissioners court of Jersey county, elected in 1839. He died from the result of injuries caused by a horse in 1869. He was an active man, and was quite successful.
     Ward Eldred was also a settler of 1831, locating on Sec. 35, T9, R11, or the Panhandle, as it is familiarly called.
     Robert B. Robbins settled on Sec. 30, T8, R11 in 1831. He was a native of New York, and came here from Jefferson county, that state. He began the work of improving his farm as soon as he had made the entry. He had on his place a shop for repairing wagons and farm implements, and in bad or inclement weather he was always ready to perform jobs of that kind. He was a shrewd man, and capable of doing most any kind of work; a good natured, kind neighbor, and had many friends. He died here in 1846.
     John Childers and Alexander Moore made settlements on Sec. 36, in T8, R11, in 1831, and James A. Carlisle on section 1 of the same township.
     Richmond Henderson, one of the pioneers of Jersey county, died of congestion of the lungs, at his resident, two miles southwest of Jerseyville, at 2 o’clock P.M., Nov. 29, 1870. He was a son of Richmond and Elizabeth Henderson, and was born at Rochester, Strafford county, N.H., Dec. 26, 1801, where he remained during the early part of his life. He came to Illinois in 1832, and purchased the land on which he afterward resided. On March 21, 1833, he was married to Mary Ann Douglass, a resident of what was then known as Otter Creek prairie. Mr. Henderson was then known by all the early settlers of Jersey county as a man of strictly honorable principles, of liberal views, with firmness of character sufficient to bear him out in whatever he deemed just and right. As a neighbor, he was neighborly, as a friend, reliable, and as a husband and father, ever anxious for the comfort and happiness of those who looked to him for protection and support, as a farmer, he was successful, leaving his family in comfortable circumstances.
     Among others who settled during the same year, 1832, were James A. Potts, J. Nathaniel Miner, Milo Bennett, George W. Lowder, John Rogers, Hugh McGill, Joel Hinson, James Whitehead, John Coventry and James Lunsdon.
     James A. Potts was a native of Tennessee. He was a man possessed of a good education, and engaged some times in surveying. He had no desire to accumulate wealth, but was an excellent citizen. He was one of the elders of the Presbyterian church up to the time of his death in April 1857.
     J. Nathaniel Miner was born near Old Crown Point, New York, during 1801. He came to Jersey county the year above. He assisted in raising the first frame building in Jerseyville, and was the first constable of the precinct after the organization of the county in 1839.
     Milo Bennett, a Vermonter, settled on section 18 on 160 acres of land, half of which he had purchased of Amos Pruitt, and half of which he entered himself. He moved to Iowa in 1840 or 1841, and during the gold excitement went to California.
     Solomon Calhoun and family settled near the present site of Jerseyville in 1833. He died there in 1869. Mr. Calhoun was a prominent man during the early days of the county’s organization, having served on the first board of county commissioners, and held various other offices.
     Samuel Day was a native of Addison county, Vt., where he grew to manhood. He was united in marriage with Maria Spencer, who died, leaving three children, one of whom became the wife of Harley E. Hayes. He was then united in marriage with Emoretta Hayes, and in 1833 came to Jersey county, and settled about four miles south of the county seat on a farm, where he resided until about 1841, when he died, leaving four children by the second marriage.

Other Prominent Citizens

     Cornelius B. Fisher, an early settler of this county, and an old and highly respected citizen, was born in New Jersey, June 14, 1809. His parents, Hendrick and Kesiah (Fulkerson) Fisher, was born, lived and died in New Jersey, where Cornelius remained until 29 years of age. June 1, 1838, he came to Jersey county and located in Jersey township, where he purchased 160 acres of land on section 17. Here he erected a small frame house, and resided eight years. In 1846 he bought the National Hotel at Jerseyville, and ran the same four years. He also owned about half the block where the hotel stands. He abandoned hotel keeping in 1850, and moved back to his farm. Two years later he returned to Jerseyville, and built the house now occupied by Dr. Miles, having previously sold his farm to Mr. Birkenmayer. He resided in Jerseyville eight years, engaged most of the time in speculating. In 1859 Mr. Fisher went back to New Jersey and purchased 200 acres of land on the Raritan river, one of the most beautiful locations in the state, to which he soon after moved his family. After spending one year there he sold his farm for $20,000 and then came back to Jersey county, Ill. He then purchased what is known as the Potts farm, containing 120 acres, on which he resided about four years, then sold a portion of it, and in 1867 bought 160 acres on section 17, Jersey township, where he has since remained. His residence is one of the finest in the county, being built of brick, two stories in height, and containing 14 rooms. It was erected at a cost of $14,000, and with its beautiful and perfectly kept surroundings, forms one of the loveliest suburban homes in this portion of the state. Mr. Fisher was married Sept. 25, 1828 to Hannah Mitchell, daughter of George Mitchell. They had five children, four of whom are living: Cornelia, wife of Joseph Bell, of Kansas City; Caroline, wife of William Hawley, of Jerseyville; Henry, married to Louisa Rappela, and living in Jerseyville; and George, married to Eva Beardsley, and living in Toledo, O. One daughter, Maria, is deceased. She was the wife of Albert Sickle, who is also deceased. Mr. Fisher has been twice married, his second wife being formerly Susan A. Chamberlain. Mr. Fisher owns, in addition to his farm of 182 acres, some town property in the city of Jerseyville. Mrs. Fisher is a member of the First Presbyterian church of Jerseyville.
     Mordecai J. Ritchey is a son of James and Julia (Robinet) Ritchey, the former a native of South Carolina, and the latter of Kentucky. They came to Illinois in 1815, settling in Pope county, where they remained until 1828, at which time they moved to Greene county, and two and a half years later, came to what is now Jersey county, and located on section 25, Jersey township. Here James Ritchey died in 1860. His widow survived until 1869. The subject of this sketch was born in Greene county, Ill., Nov. 13, 1830. He was reared on a farm, and resided with his parents until their death. In 1857 he went to Kansas, with the intention of purchasing land, but not being pleased with the outlook, returned home without doing so. Later he visited Nebraska, but made no investment there. He was married, Jan. 22, 1863, to Sarah T. Briggs, daughter of John and Mary Briggs. They are the parents of eight children, seven of whom are living: James, married to Nellie Pruitt, and living in Jersey county; Emma, Mordecai, Julius A., John, Cordelia, and Van. Mr. Ritchey is the owner of a fine farm of 541 acres, and has a handsome residence, erected in 1881, at a cost of $3,000, also other improvements of a substantial description. He is a democrat politically, and has been supervisor for three years. He is a man of intelligence and enterprise, and as a citizen ranks high in the esteem of all.
     W. H. Fulkerson came to Jersey county in 1866, locating then one mile and a half north of Jerseyville, where he has since resided. He is one of the largest land owners in the county, and one of the most extensive breeders of short horn cattle in the state of Illinois. His residence, one of the finest in Jersey county, is a two-story brick structure, and a model of comfort and convenience. His barns, of which he has several, located on different portions of his large estate, are substantial, and well adapted to the use for which they were intended. He has also other improvements of a good description. Mr. Fulkerson was born in Claiborne county, Tenn., Sept. 9, 1834. He was colonel of the 63rd Tennessee, C.S.A., during the Rebellion. He has served as county judge of Jersey county, one term. During the construction of the St. L. & J. branch of the W., St. L. & P. R. R., Mr. Fulkerson acted as general manager for the company. He is one of the leading stock-breeders of this portion of the state, and a prominent and honored citizen of Jersey county.
     Alexander A. McReynolds was born in Sumner county, Tenn., Sept. 28, 1819. His parents, Joseph and Margaret (Anderson) McReynolds, came to Illinois in 1835, settling within the present limits of Jersey county, on what is now section 15, Jersey township. The subject of this sketch was reared upon a farm, remaining with his parents until 27 years old. He then improved a farm for himself on section 15, where he has since lived. He was married April 21, 1847, to Helen M. Spencer, daughter of John L. and Elizabeth Spencer. Mr. and Mrs. McReynolds had six children, two of whom are now living: Eugene S., married to Mary Cockrell, and living in Jerseyville; and Sallie T. Mrs. McReynolds died March 15, 1861, and Mr. McReynolds was married Nov. 15, 1865 to Alanora Van Horn, daughter of David and Ann VanHorn, natives of New York. By this marriage five children were born, four of whom are living: Helen, wife of Herbert Force, of Nebraska; David, George and Maggie. Mr. McReynolds owns 220 acres of land, which is highly cultivated and improved. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, in which he is an elder. He served as road supervisor two years before the township organization. He is one of the earliest settlers of the county, and justly deserving of the high esteem in which he is held in the community where he resides. His second wife died May 1, 1875.
     Lloyd W. Sunderland first came to this county in 1838, being then 21 years old. He remained here a short time, engaged as clerk in the only store in Jerseyville, but soon returned to his home in New Jersey, where he was born, May 15, 1817. His parents were John P. and Elizabeth Sunderland, natives of New Jersey. At the age of 16, he went to Philadelphia, and there learned the brick mason’s trade. On his return to New Jersey, he remained nine years, engaged the greater part of his time, as deputy sheriff and constable. In 1847 he again returned to Jersey county, and settled on section 8, of Jersey township, where he has since resided. He owns 280 acres of land, and is one of the leading farmers of the township. He was married Dec. 23, 1839, to Sarah A. Steinburg, daughter of William and Nancy Steinburg. They have 10 children – Harriet, James, Joseph, John, William, Justice, Annie, Carrie, Ella, and Lloyd. Of these three are unmarried. Mr. Sunderland is a democrat, politically.
     Oliver S. Randolph was born in Shiloh, Cumberland county, N.J., Nov. 15, 1847, a son of Isaac S. and Jane E. (Ayers) Randolph, also natives of New Jersey. Isaac Randolph was an architect by profession. He died in 1851 and his wife in 1883. Oliver S. Randolph was reared on a farm, and resided with his grandparents until 18 years of age. In the fall of 1865 he came to Jersey county and lived with his uncle, Oliver Randolph, until the death of the latter, after which he went back to New Jersey and remained about one year. In 1869 he returned to Jersey county and located in Jersey township. He settled on his present farm in 1871. It is situated on section 18, and contains 120 acres. He was married March 22, 1870 to Julia E. Tichenor, daughter of Stephen and Jane Tichenor. Her mother married Oliver Randolph, his uncle, in 1862. Mr. and Mrs. Randolph are the parents of five children: Charles, Alice, Jennie, Oliver P. and Carleton. Mrs. Randolph is a member of the Baptist church.
     Charles Brooks, a prosperous farmer of Jersey county, was born in Lancashire, Eng., May 4, 1831, a son of William and Mary A. (Wagstaff) Brooks, also natives of England. When Charles was 11 years old, his parent immigrated to the United States, and located in New Jersey, where they remained a short time, then went to Rhode Island, settling at Manville, on the Blackstone river. Here all the children of the family who were of suitable age, worked in the cotton mills. In the fall of 1844 William Brooks took a trip to Illinois, in search of a location, and purchased 80 acres of land near the southeast corner of Greene county, to which in Aug. 1845, he moved his family. Charles lived with his parents until 20 years of age. He then began farming for himself. In 1851 he came to Jersey county and rented a farm of 80 acres. Feb. 11, 1852 he was married to Sarah J. Short, daughter of Glover and Rachel Short, of Jersey county. They had five children, four of whom are living: Laura J., wife of John W. Voorhees, of La Plata, Mo.; Charles E., married to Olivia Darlington, and living in Jersey county; Martha E., wife of Oliver P. Colean, of Denver, Col.; and Olive E., wife of George W. Adams, of Jersey county. Mrs. Brooks died Aug. 31, 1879, and Mr. Brooks was married again Dec. 1, 1880, to Nannie J. Akard, daughter of Benjamin Akard. By this union there is one child, Arthur L. Mr. Brooks now owns 232 acres of land on sections 4 and 16, Jersey township, where he has a delightful residence, all the surroundings of which indicate thrift and comfort. Mr. and Mrs. Brooks are members of the M.E. church. He is a democrat in politics.
     Charles Perrine is a son of one of the early settlers of Jersey county, Thomas Perrine, a native of New Jersey, who came here in an early day. On his arrival here he went to work for Abijah Davis, and afterward purchased 160 acres of land, on which he built one of the first frame houses in Jersey county. His wife, the mother of the subject of this sketch, was Helen K. (Vandenburg) Perrine. Thomas Perrine died March 5, 1875, and was buried in the Jerseyville cemetery. Charles Perrine was born in this county, April 4, 1859, and here reared on a farm, remaining with his parents until their death. He received his education in the schools of this township, and attended one term at the high school in Jerseyville. In 1880 he was married, on Oct. 18th, to Hattie Brooks, daughter of James E. and Anna Brooks. They have one child, Charlie. Mr. Perrine owns 160 acres of land, and is engaged in general farming.
     Charles Milton was born in Rome, Oneida county, N.Y., Jan. 6, 1826, a son of Palmer and Ruby (Tibbetts) Milton, the former a native of Rhode Island, the latter of New York. In 1832 the family moved to Canada, where the parents resided until their death. Palmer Milton was a cooper by trade, also a contractor and builder. Charles learned the cooper’s trade with his father while living in Canada, and followed the same until he left home. At the age of 14 years he went on the lakes as sailor, following that life two years, after which he engaged in milling and engineering, until he came to this county in the spring of 1849. Here he worked out by the month for three years, then went into a saw and grist mill and worked at engineering about two years. He was married March 16, 1853 to Mrs. Frances (Benson) Fitzgerald, daughter of Henderson and Elizabeth (Welch) Benson, and soon after located on a farm on section 3, Jersey township. In 1872 he erected a handsome and commodious residence, at a cost of $2,800, in which he now resides. He owns 235 acres of land, and carries on general farming. Mr. and Mrs. Milton have had six children, three of whom are living: Charles W., married to Isabel Hicks, and living in Caldwell, Kan.; Liphus A., married to Jennie Tucker, and living at the same place; and Laura E. The deceased are: Frank S., Sarah A., and Lillian. Mrs. Milton is a member of the M.E. church. Mr. Milton is a republican in politics, and a worthy and esteemed citizen.
     Frank I. Lowe, son of Richard and Sarah D. (Williamson) Lowe, was born in Jersey county, Ill., Jan. 29, 1855. His early life was spent on the farm, where he remained with his parents until 23 years of age. He was then married, Dec. 25, 1877, to Fannie E. Bridges, daughter of Hiram and Eliza Bridges. Mr. and Mrs. Lowe had two children, Nellie V. and Mabel E. Mrs. Lowe died Feb. 6, 1883, and was buried in Oak Grove cemetery at Jerseyville. Mr. Lowe cultivates 160 acres of land, located on sections 11 and 12. He is a democrat politically, and an industrious and enterprising young farmer.
     John Vahle, deceased, was born in Germany, July 25, 1817. He came to America when quite young, and settled in Maryland, where he remained a number of years, coming from there to Jersey county, Ill. He located in English township, where he purchased 80 acres of land, to which he afterwards added 40 acres. He was married in April 1852 to Mary M. Harris, daughter of Asa and Sarah Harris. They had eight children: Henry, now married to Dora Hooper, and living in English township; Louis, married to Lena Goetten, also living in English township; Anthony; Elizabeth, wife of Peter Dower; Caroline, Frank, and William. Mr. Vahle died March 18, 1873, and was buried in the Armstrong cemetery, in English township. Mrs. Vahle now owns 280 acres of land, with 200 acres in English township, and the remainder on section 10, Jersey township, where she now resides. Since the death of her husband, Mrs. Vahle has carried on the farm successfully, adding to it 160 acres, and making many improvements. The family are members of the Catholic church of Jerseyville.
     John J. Ballard, a resident of Jerseyville township, is a native of Tennessee, having been born in Campbell county, Oct. 14, 1829, his parents being Winston and Isabel (James) Ballard, the former a native of Ohio, the latter of North Carolina. His parents came to Illinois in 1842 and located in Greene county for three or four years, then moved to Alton, where they stayed one year. From there they moved to Missouri, and then returned to Illinois. His father died in Macoupin county in 1851, and his mother in Greene county in 1882. The subject of this sketch was brought up on a farm, remaining with his parents until he was 15 years old. He then returned to Tennessee and there followed farming and blacksmithing for 10 years. In 1857 he moved back to Greene county and settled near Rockbridge. Two years later he moved to Jersey county, locating on Hawkins’ prairie, where he resided 10 years. In 1867 he came to Jerseyville, serving as constable from that date until 1873, after which he acted as deputy sheriff two years. He located on section 8, Jersey township, where he has been farming on Col. W. H. Fulkerson’s farm for the past 14 years. Mr. Ballard was married in Union county, E. Tenn., on March 18, 1851, to Lavand Graves, daughter of Henry Graves. She died May 11, 1883, and was buried in Greene county. They had eight children, six of whom are living: Louis H., married to Nancy S. Whitlock, and living in Greene county; William, Mary J., Francis M., James D. B. and Catherine.
     Joseph B. Woolsey, deceased, was born in Delaware county, N.Y. on Aug. 10, 1809, his parents being Amos and Phoebe (Briggs) Woolsey. When Joseph had reached his 14th year, his parents removed to a point near Syracuse, where he was reared to manhood and finished his education. He was there united in marriage with Priscilla Ann Barber, a native of Onondaga Valley, N.Y. on May 4, 1831. She was a daughter of Joel and Permelia (Adams) Barber. In 1833 Mr. and Mrs. Woolsey started for Illinois, and located in what was then a wilderness, but in what is now the prosperous farming country of Jersey township, Jersey county. Mr. Woolsey had come out the year before an bought 160 acres of land. On his arrival in this state in 1833, he engaged at his trade, that of a carpenter, which he continued to follow for four years at Kane, Greene county. At the expiration of that time, he moved to his farm in Jersey township, this county, where he resided until the time of his death, Dec. 30, 1881. He was an enterprising citizen, and accumulated some 600 acres of land, 160 of which is retained by his wife, the remainder having been sold, and the proceeds divided among the children. Mr. and Mrs. Woolsey were members of the Presbyterian church, having brought their church letters from their native state. He was an upright and honorable man, kind and courteous, and all his acquaintances were his friends. Mr. and Mrs. Woolsey were the parents of eight children, six of whom were reared to manhood, and five of whom are yet living: Edward P., deceased, who married Mary L. Waddle; Joel B., married Martha Fitzgerald, and now resides near Auburn, Sangamon county; James D., married Mary Baugh, and now resides in Kansas; George H., married Barbara A. Wharton, and resides in Jersey county; Simeon, married Keturah Snell, and resides in Sangamon county; Amos H., married Mary Ritchey, and lives in Greene county. Their two daughters died: Caroline M., July 14, 1837; and Ann, Aug. 30, 1850.
     Augustus Recker is a native of Germany, born in 1853, a son of Henry and Agnes (Osa) Recker. In 1869 he left his native land and immigrated to America. On his arrival he spent two years in looking for a location, stopping at different points, and finally decided to settle in Greene county, Ill., where he remained some eight years, engaged in farming. In 1883 he moved to Jersey county and located two and a half miles north of Grafton. They are now living one and one-half miles north of Jerseyville. Mr. Recker was married in 1875 to Ellen Miller, a native of Greene county, Ill. Four children have been born to them, three of whom are livng: Henry, Charlie, and Daisy Agnes. Hattie, the first child, died in infancy. Mr. Recker’s father, Henry Recker, died in Germany in 1880. His mother is still living.
     Matthew C. Stanley, a native of Cheshire, Eng., was born Feb. 26, 1819, and is a son of Thomas and Alice (Cook) Stanley. In 1827 Thomas Stanley moved with his family to America, settling in Newark, N.J., where they remained until 1836. They then moved to Camptown, in the same state, from where Matthew, in 1843, came to Jersey county, Ill., and located on section 25, Jersey township, where he yet resides. He owns a valuable farm of 280 acres with excellent improvements. He has served four years as a justice of the peace, and is a much esteemed citizen. Mr. Stanley was married in 1848 to Elizabeth Armstrong, and by this union has eight children: Caroline H., wife of Charles W. Warren, of this township; Robert T., now living in Blue Springs, Gage county, Neb., where he is engaged in the livery business; Edward B., also in Gage county, Neb., engaged in farming; Charles B., Mary E., Douglas, Belle and Nettie, living with their parents. Mrs. Stanley is a member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Stanley belongs to the I.O.O.F. and the P. of H. His father, Thomas Stanley, died with the cholera in this township in 1851. His mother died at the same place in 1861. Both are buried in the old cemetry at Jerseyville.
     George W. Embley was born in Mercer county, N.J., May 15, 1837, a son of Joseph and Ann (Mount) Embley, also natives of New Jersey. George was raised on a farm, and remained with his parents until 21 years old. He then followed farming for three or four years, after which he learned the carpenter’s trade, at which he worked about 12 years. In March 1877, he came to Jersey county and settled on section 8, Jersey township, where he has ever since resided. He has an excellent farm, containing 103 acres, and carries on general farming. He was married Feb. 10, 1858 to Susan Schuyler, daughter of Aaron Schuyler. Twelve children have been born to them, five of whom are now living: Susie S., wife of Holmes W. Smock; Georgiana, Irene E., Ada, and Alvin V. Mr. Embley is politically a supporter of the democratic party, and a worthy and respected citizen.
     Thos. K. Donnalley, son of James and Margaret (Kelso) Donnalley, was born in Bucks county, Penn., July 2, 1808. James Donnalley was a weaver by trade, but followed that occupation only a short time. He moved to the city of Philadelphia, where he resided many years, engaged in painting. He died in 1851(?), aged 73 years. His wife, Margaret, died in 1834, at the age of 65 years. Thomas, in his youth, learned the shoemaker’s trade in Philadelphia, and there followed the same for 28 years. Hen then bought a small farm and engaged in farming, which he continued eight years in Pennsylvania. Then in the spring of 1856, he sold his farm and came to Jersey county, Ill., where he purchased 160 acres on section 1, Jersey township, on which he has since resided. He now has a well improved farm and a comfortable and desirable home. He was married May 20, 1830, to Susan Felty, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Felty. Mr. and Mrs. Donnalley have had nine children, six of whom are living: Elizabeth, widow of William Gaston, who died in 1864; Cordelia, wife of Edwin Barnes, of Montgomery county, Penn.; Lydia; Margaret, wife of Cornelius Whitehead, of Jersey county; Susan; and Caroline, wife of Joel Williams, of Gage county, Neb. Those deceased are: Mary A., who died in 1862; Ulan, who died in 1859; and Sarah, who died in infancy, in 1842. Mr. and Mrs. Donnalley and family are members of the Presbyterian church. He has held the office of school director for several years, and as a citizen is much esteemed.
     B. A. Riggs, deceased, was born in New Jersey, Oct. 1, 1811. He came to the county May 28, 1836 and located near Jerseyville, where he contine to live, until the time of his death, on a farm which consisted of 347 acres, and was located on section 17, of Jersey township. He was married to Cynthia Leigh, daughter of Thomas and Martha Leigh, Sept. 29, 1852. They are the parents of four children: Thomas, who was married to Emeline Moore, and now resides in Brighton, Col.; Samuel, who was married to Betty Bell, now living in Morrisonville, Christian county; Cele A., now the wife of George Weller; and Abraham L. Mrs. Riggs now owns 110 acres of land, and manages the farm with the assistance of one son. Mr. Riggs died Nov. 13, 1879. His life was that of a conscientious and upright citizen; as a husband and father, he was solicitous, tender, and affectionate; as a neighbor, he was accommodating and kind; as a friend and citizen, he ws straight forward and true.
     John Wood, son of John and Mary (Hawkins) Wood, pioneers of Jersey county, was born here April 23, 1834. His parents were natives of Kentucky, who came here at an early day, and entered 160 acres of land on section 25, Jersey township, where John Wood, Sr., died when the subject of this sketch was about two years old. He continued to reside with his mother until her death in Oct. 1875. Mr. Wood was married, Sept. 28, 1865, to Anna Bethel, daughter of Alanson and Nancy (Rhodes) Bethel. Four children have been born to them, three of whom are now living: Thomas O., George, and Nettie. Mollie died in 1874. Mr. Wood has a desirable farm comprising 140 acres. Mrs. Wood is a member of the Baptist church. Mr. Wood is a democrat in politics, and a worthy and respected citizen. In 1884 they visited southeastern Kansas, and spent some time in visiting and viewing the country.
     Jarrett T. Grimes, son of Philip and Polly Grimes, is probably the oldest man now living that was born in the limits of Jersey county, the date of his birth being the second week in Jan. 1820. Philip Grimes was a native of Virginia, and his wife of Tennessee. They immigrated to Illinois in 1816, settling near Upper Alton, in Madison county. Two years later they moved to a place five and one-half miles northwest of the present city of Jerseyville, where Jarrett T. was born. He was reared on a farm, and obtained his education in the pioneer schools of the county. In 1838 he was united in marriage with Charity Brown, a native of St. Charles county, Mo. They had born to them 10 children, six of whom are living: Philip, now a farmer, of Gage county, Neb.; Edward, who is at present engaged in farming in Montgomery county, Ill.; James R., on the homestead farm; Mary E., wife of Uriah Hardwick, of Montgomery county; Isabella, at home with her parents; and Florence, also at home. Those deceased are: Joseph, who died Sept. 28, 1861, aged nine years; Garrett T., who died Feb. 3, 1853, at the age of 18 days; and Robert, who died Jan. 12, 1866, at the age of eight years and three months. Mrs. Grimes died July 21, 1876, aged 56 years, 2 months and 8 days. Mr. Grimes owns 710 acres of land and carries on farming. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and the Anti-Horse Thief Society. Having lived in Jersey county for more than 60 years, Mr. Grimes has been a witness of the vast changes which have taken place within that long period, and has contributed fully his share toward the growth and development of this section. He ranks among the best and most prominent citizens.
     Glover Short, an early settler, and an old and highly respected citizen of Jersey county, was born in Pittsylvania, Va., Oct. 19, 1800. His parents, Josiah and Isabel (Craw) Short, moved in 1804 to Washington county, of the same state, there residing until 1818, when they moved west to Boone county, Mo. In the spring of 1826 Glover Short came to Illinois, locating near White Hall, in Greene county, where he purchased 600 acres of land, and remained until the spring of 1842. At that date he came to Jersey county, and rented a farm near Jerseyville. Three years later he settled on section 3, Jersey township, and commenced improving the farm where he now resides. In the spring of 1857 he purchased property in the town of Jerseyville, and moved there, remaining there eight years, renting his farm in the meantime. At the end of that period he returned to his farm, which has since been his home. Mr. Short now owns 160 acres of land. He was married April 4, 1826, to Rachel Hodges, daughter of Daniel Hodges. Eight children were born to them, all of whom are now deceased. Mrs. Short died April 11, 1865. Mr. Short is a member of the M.E. church, and justly merits the esteem with which he is regarded by all.
     Edmund H. Short, deceased, was a son of Glover and Rachel Short, and was born in Jersey county, Aug. 3, 1843. He was raised on a farm, receiving a good education in the schools of Jersey county and at Lebanon College. Oct. 23, 1868, he was married to Hattie D. Waddle, who died in 1870. Nov. 23, 1873, he was married to Mollie E. Ashford, daughter of George and Margaret Ashford. By this union there were two children, Glover W. and Della M. Mr. Short followed farming on section 3, Jersey township, where he owned 80 acres. His death occurred Nov. 30, 1884. He was a kind and loving husband, and an indulgent father, and his loss was keenly felt by his bereaved widow and children. Mrs. Short now runs the farm, with the aid of hired help.
     Charles Wharton is a son of William and Ann (Richards) Wharton, both natives of Pennsylvania. He was born in that state, Jan. 21, 1824. His childhood and early youth were spent in his native state. In 1842 he came to Illinois, locating in Jersey county, where for about three years he worked out by the month. In 1845 he was married to Mary Ann Boulter, daughter of William and Barbara Boulter, natives of England. By this union, 10 children were born, five of whom are now living: Barbara A., wife of George Woolsey, of Jersey county; Mary E.; Charles H.; Patience L.; and Lydia, wife of George M. Chappell, of Macoupin county. Mr. Wharton’s farm comprises 100 acres, located on section 7, Jersey township, and 40 acres adjoining Greene county, which was first settled on in 1839 by his wife’s parents. When he came to this county it was very thinly settled, and he may be properly classed among the early settlers. He is a republican politically, and a much respected citizen. Mrs. Wharton is a member of the Baptist church.
     Freeman J. Mains, a prominent citizen and wealthy farmer of this township, was born in Greene county, Ill., Feb. 7, 1836, a son of James and Abigail (Parker) Mains, natives of Illinois. James Mains was born in Greene county, where he resided the greater portion of his life. Freeman J. Mains was brought up on a farm, and resided with his parents until he was 24 years of age. He then bought 20 acres of land on section 23, Jersey township, on which he erected a small house. Two years later he purchased 40 acres more, to which he removed, and on which he has ever since resided. Here in 1881 he built a new and substantial dwelling. His other improvements are of a good description. He now owns 920 acres of land and carries on general farming. Nov. 24, 1859, Mr. Mains was united in marriage with Elizabeth Stevens, daughter of Isaiah and Sarah (Scroggins) Stevens. Ten children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Mains, of whom six are now living: Lucy, wife of Thomas Wylder; William Warren, Tina, James, and Tossie. Those deceased are: Orie, Bobbie, and two who died in infancy. Mrs. Mains died June 10, 1883. Mr. Mains was elected a member of the board of supervisors in 1885, in which capacity he is now serving.
     Joseph W. Fitzgerald is a son of one of the earliest settlers of this county, Jesse Fitzgerald, a native of Kentucky, who came to this county at an early date. He was accompanied by his wife, Elizabeth (Curry) Fitzgerald, also a native of Kentucky. On his arrival in Jersey county, Mr. Fitzgerald bought of his cousin, who had entered it, 400 acres of land. They moved from Kentucky with ox teams, and first stopped in St. Louis county, from where they came to Jersey. Jesse Fitzgerald was a cabinet-maker by trade, at which occupation he worked previous to his coming to this county, when he engaged in farming in the wilderness of this new country. He died April 9, 1855, and his wife, April 28, 1883. Joseph W. was born March 8, 1842, and reared on the farm, living with his parents until he arrived at the age 19. He was married Feb. 21, 1861 to Susan Woolsey, daughter of Amos and Eunice Woolsey. In Aug. 1862, Mr. Fitzgerald enlisted in Co. C, of the 122nd Ill. Inf., and served until the close of the war, taking part in a number of noted engagements. He now owns 60 acres on sections 3 and 34. He is a republican politically, and has held the office of school director about nine years. Mr. and Mrs. Fitzgerald have four children: Otis, Della, Addie and Cora.
     John Cray was born in Somerset county, N.J., on Feb. 16, 1826. He is a son of Benjamin and Ellen (Weaver) Cray, natives of the same state. In 1854 he came to Jersey county, Ill., and for about two years worked out by the month. He then rented a farm, on which he lived some six or eight years, after which he moved to Montgomery county, and purchased a farm of 53 acres near Litchfield. Two years later he sold his property in that county, and returned to Jersey county, and at first bought 40 acres of land. This he soon after sold, and purchased 120 acres on section 1, Jersey township, where he has since resided. Mr. Cray was married, April 5, 1856, to Minerva Davis, daughter of Samuel and Polly Davis. Six children have been born to them, four of whom are now living: Mary, Augustus, Lela and Herbert. Mrs. Cray and her daughter Mary are members of the Baptist church. Mr. Cray has held the office of school director 12, years, and is a useful and much respected citizen.
     John W. Davis, a prominent and leading farmer of Jersey township, was born in North Carolina, Sept. 19, 1819. His parents, James and Elizabeth (Morrow) Davis, were also natives of North Carolina. In 1835 the family came to Jersey county, locating in this township, where James died in 1840, and his wife in 1851. John W. lived with his parents until their death, and has always remained on the homestead farm, of which he took charge on the death of his father. He was married Dec. 8, 1847, to Eliza A. Fitzgerald, daughter of Jesse and Elizabeth Fitzgerald. By this union eight children were born: Elam, married to Alice Bullard and living in Sangamon county; Charles A., married to Eliza Felter, and living in Jersey county; Georgiana, wife of David Hunt, of New Jersey; Douglas; Edward L.; Eva, wife of Edward Acom, of Nebraska; and Eliza, wife of Lloyd Sunderland, of this county. Mr. Davis owns a fine farm on section 2, comprising 540 acres, also 320 acres of land in Sangamon county, and 640 acres in Nebraska, making altogether 1,500 acres. Mrs. Davis died in 1873, and in Feb. 1876 Mr. Davis was married to Emma Cray. Mr. Davis visits Nebraska once or twice annually, to look after his interests in that new and rapidly growing state. He is one of the substantial and influential citizens of Jersey county, and stands high in the esteem of all who know him.
     Silas W. Tolman, deceased, was born in Greene county, April 2, 1826, a son of Cyrus and Polly (Eldred) Tollman, the former a native of New York. Cyrus Tolman was one of the pioneers of Greene county, Ill., having come to this state in 1818. He was a member of the first jury ever empanelled in that county. The subject of this sketch located in Jersey county in 1840, settling on section 6, Jersey township, where he resided until his death, which occurred May 2, 1874. He was buried in the Jerseyville cemetery. He was twice married, first to Jane Gregory, who died in 1860. They had one child, who died and was buried in the coffin with its mother. He was married the second time to Clara Wheeler, daughter of Daniel and Electa Wheeler. By this union there were three children: Thos. P., now married to Ella Smith, and living in Missouri; George O., and Louis E. Mrs. Tolman owns 270 acres of land in Jersey township, where she resides, also 160 acres in Sangamon county, Ill. She carries on farming, assisted by her children, and is successful in her undertakings.
     Richard I. Lowe, of Jersey township, was born in Somerset county, N.J., May 6, 1802, a son of Isaac and Theodosia (Gray) Lowe, also natives of New Jersey. In 1842 Richard I. Lowe moved from New Jersey to the city of Philadelphia, there remaining a few years, engaged first in the grocery business, and later dealt in real estate. In 1847 he came to Illinois and settled on section 12, Jersey township, Jersey county, Ill., where he had previously purchased 700 acres of land, and here engaged in farming. He still resides on section 12, where he now owns 480 acres of land. In 1866 he erected an elegant two-story brick residence on his farm, at a cost of $20,000. It is pleasantly situated, and the surroundings are correspondingly handsome. Mr. Lowe deals to a considerable extent in stock, principally horses and short horn cattle, and has been a very energetic and enterprising farmer. He was married first to Mary Disbrow, daughter of Daniel H. Disbrow. He had by this union, one child, Theodosia, now married to Richard Nutt, of this county. Mrs. Lowe afterwards died, and he was married in the fall of 1837 to Sarah D. Williamson, a daughter of Abraham T. Williamson. They were parents of eleven children, six of whom are living: Abraham, married to Flora Evans, and living in Jerseyville; Isaac N., married to Helen Davis, and living at Auburn, Ill.; Mary, wife of James Davidson, of Jersey county; John W., married to Alvias Darby, living in Jerseyville; Frank J., who is now a widower; and Augustus T. Mrs. Lowe died April 7, 1884. Mr. Lowe is a democrat politically.
     Nicholas Grosjean was born in France on Dec. 6, 1829, and is a son of Joseph and Elsie (Salsy) Grosjean, both also natives of France. In 1857 Nicholas bade farewell to his native land, and taking passage on board a sailing vessel at Havre, came to the United States, landing in due time in the city of New Orleans, La. He came from there directly to Jerseyville, where he opened a barber shop, and carried on the same until 1861. He then enlisted in Co. F., 14th Ill. Inf., and served about one year, after which he returned to Jerseyville, and resumed his former business. He continued to run a barber shop about three years, then on account of poor health, was obliged to give up business entirely, and for several years was unable to do any work. In 1880 he purchased 40 acres of land on section 16, Jersey township, on which he has since resided. In Aug. 1859 Mr. Grosjean was married to Christiana Scheese, daughter of Fred Scheese. They are the parents of seven children, four of whom are living: Frederick, Julia, Nicholas, and Henry. Mr. Grosjean is a democrat in politics, an industrious farmer and a man of intelligence and enterprise.
     Patrick B. Burns is a native of county Meath, Ireland, born Aug. 15, 1825, a son of Patrick and Anna (Murray) Burns, also natives of Ireland. They immigrated to America and settled in New Brunswick, N.J., where they resided until their death. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, lived with his parents until age 23. In the spring of 1862 he came to Illinois and located in Jersey county. For three years following he worked out by the month in Jersey township, and during the time saved enough of his earnings to purchase 80 acres of land on sections 3 and 4, where in 1864 he permanently settled, and has since resided. He now owns 100 acres, and is in prosperous circumstances. He was married in the winter of 1855 to Mary Allen, daughter of Richard and Margaret Allen. Mr. and Mrs. Burns have had born to them eight children, seven of whom are living: Patrick W., now married to Mary Mahara, and living in this township; Frank, Hugh, John, Richard, Anna, and Mary. The family are members of the Catholic church.
     Caleb A. Post is a son of James T. and Ardelia (Whitford) Post, natives of Vermont, and pioneers of Jersey county, having located here in 1833, settling two and one-half miles west of Jerseyville, where they purchased 160 acres of land. They resided on the same place 40 years, then moved to Jerseyville, where James T. Post died. The subject of this sketch was born in Jersey county, Nov. 24, 1834, and was reared on the farm, where he remained until 21 years old. He then went to Macoupin county, and purchased 180 acres of land, on which he lived four years. At the expiration of that time, he exchanged farms with his brother, and removed to this township, which has since been his home. He now owns 650 acres of land in Nebraska, and 280 in this county. In 1882 he built on his farm in this county, a fine and commodious residence, costing $4,000. He has been three times married. His first wife was Malissa Post, who died about six weeks after their marriage. He was married the second time Jan. 3, 1856, to Mary T. Norris, daughter of John Norris, and by this union had eight children, five of whom are now living: Elmer E., married to Fannie Burkenmayer and now living in Nebraska; Ida M.; Della M.; Grace and Walter. Mrs. Post died Feb. 24, 1873, and in April 1874, Mr. Post was married a third time to Mrs. Maggie (Murray) Murphy, by whom he has had four children, of whom three are now living: Mable G., Ollie M., and Charles A. Maude is deceased. Mr. Post is a member of the Baptist church, and his wife of the Catholic church. He is also a member of the Masonic lodge of Jerseyville. He is independent in politics.
     Rev. Thomas Potter is a native of Menard county, Ill., born April 12, 1830. He is a son of Edward and Elizabeth (Armstrong) Potter, the former a native of North Carolina, the latter of Tennessee. They settled in Illinois about 1820. The subject of this sketch was the sixth of a family of 15 children, and was brought up on a farm, where he remained until he attained his majority. In 1852 he began preparing himself for the ministry of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. He attended Bethel College in Tennessee three years, and spent altogether seven years in fitting himself for the high calling which he had chosen. A portion of this time he taught school, studying at the same time. In 1859 he came to Jersey county, and for several subsequent years, preached here and in Greene county. He moved to Jerseyville in 1863, and remained two years. He then bought a residence and 17 acres of land on section 5, Jersey township, which has since been his home. In the meantime, he has preached on different circuits. He is well educated, a man of much ability, and as a preacher, is well liked. Mr. Potter was married Aug. 28, 1865 to Catherine Updike, daughter of Theodore and Ellen Updike. By this union there are three children: Theodore E., Jennie A., and Ettie E.
     Thomas J. McReynolds came to Jersey county in March 1835, accompanying his parents, Joseph and Margaret (Anderson) McReynolds. Joseph McReynolds and his wife were both natives of North Carolina, but at the time of the birth of the subject of this sketch, March 6, 1832, they resided in Sumner county, Tenn. They soon after moved to Posey county, Ind., where they remained until the spring of 1835. On their arrival in Jersey county, they settled on section 15, Jersey township, purchasing 160 acres of land. Joseph McReynolds died here July 3, 1860. His widow survived him until Jan. 26, 1873. Thomas J. has always resided on the homestead, settled by his father in 1835, and has now one of the best farms in the township. His residence, barn and other improvements are well and substantially built, and everything about the place is indicative of the thrift and enterprise of the owner. Mr. McReynolds was married Nov. 2, 1854 to Rosa A. Keller, daughter of William and Dorothy Keller. They have had eight children, seven of whom are living: James G., married to Carrie S. Sunderland, and living in Jerseyville; William J., married to Elizabeth Martin, also in Jerseyville; Charles L.; Lela M.; Maggie A.; Gussie R.; and Frances M. Mr. and Mrs. McReynolds are members of the M.E. church. He is politically a democrat. His farm now comprises 190 acres of land, on sections 15, 16 and 4.
     Guy C. Richards, a native of Broome county, N.Y., was born Nov. 2, 1819, a son of Daniel and Ruth (Tichnor) Richards, the former a native of Connecticut, the latter of New Hampshire. In 1823 Daniel Richards moved with his family to Illinois, settling near Jacksonville in Morgan county, where they remained about 14 years. In 1836 they moved to Greene county, locating on the south line adjoining Jersey. Guy resided with his parents until 24 years old. He was married in 1843 to Hannah Pope, daughter of Samuel and Mary( Geddes) Pope. They have a family of six children: Mary, married to Thomas Erwin, of English township; Erastus P., who is now a widower; Christopher G., married to Hattie Green, and living in English township; Jacob and Hannah (twins); and George M. Mr. Richards owns 270 acres of land, situated partly in Greene and partly in Jersey county. He is a man of intelligence and enterprise. He is politically a republican.
     Nathaniel Miner, an old and much respected citizen of Jersey county, was born in New York, Jan. 1, 1801. When he was one year old his parents moved to Bridgeport, Vt., where he made his home until he arrived at the age of 33 years. He then came to Illinois and settled on section 19, Jersey county, entering a quarter section of government land, which he improved. He was married Aug. 3, 1834 to Louisa Jackson, a native of Vermont. They were the parents of seven sons: Edward, now deputy clerk of Greene county, residing at Carrollton; Charles E., of this township; Aaron J., a farmer of Calhoun county; Lorenzo J., who died while serving his country during the late war, at Murfreesboro, Tenn., he was first lieutenant of Co. C., 61st Ill. Inf.; Darwin C., a resident of Jerseyville; and George W., of this township. Mrs. Miner died Aug. 22, 1869, and was buried in Jerseyville. In 1872 Mr. Miner was married to Mary J. Ingles, a native of New Hampshire. He has followed farming since coming to this county. He is a strict temperance man, and enjoys the confidence and esteem of all.
     Charles Catt, son of John and Sarah (Bradford) Catt, was born in Sussex county, England. His parents, both natives of England, are now deceased; the former died in 1838, the latter in 1846. Charles came to America in 1837 and settled in Warren county, O., where he lived two years. He then went to Quincy, Ill., stopped a short time and returned to Ohio. Two years later he came again to this state, locating in this county. Here he worked on a farm for several years. In 1854 he purchased land on section 20, Jersey township, where he has since resided. He now has a farm of 120 acres, with good improvements. He also owns two houses in the city of Jerseyville. Mr. Catt was married in 1851 to Mary Riggs, a native of New Jersey, who died April 14, 1872. In the fall of 1873, Mr. Catt was married to Catherine Welch, a native of Ireland. By this union there are six children: Charles, John, Harriet, Henry, Frank, and James. Mr. Catt came to this county in very limited circumstances, and by industry and energy, has succeeded in accumulating a comfortable property.
     Peter Power, deceased, was a native of Ireland. He came to America in 1851 and settled then in Jersey township, Jersey county, Ill., where he resided until his death, which occurred in 1878. His remains were buried in the Catholic cemetery of Jerseyville. His widow, Ellen Power, survived him until 1884. He owned, at the time of his death, 80 acres of land. Both Mr. Power and his wife were Catholics in their religion. They had six children: Patrick, who now lives on the homestead farm; Mary, now married and living in this township; Philip, of this county; Thos., also of this county; John, in Chicago; and Maurice, of Jersey township. Patrick Power, son of Peter Power, was born in Ireland in 1847, and came with his parents to this county in 1851. He has been a resident of Jersey township since that date, and has always followed farming. He owns a valuable farm of 80 acres, all improved. He is a member of the Catholic church.
     William H. Hunter, Sr., deceased, was born in county Antrim, Ireland, on June 13, 1831, his parents being John and Catherine Hunter. He left his native country and came to America in 1850, locating first in Hudson county, N.J., where he engaged in farming. In 1853 he came westward to Illinois and took up a location in what is now Jersey township, Jersey county, in which township his family still resides. They moved to their present location on section 3 in Jersey township in 1867, where they have 90 acres of land. Mr. Hunter was married on July 18, 1849 to Sarah Kenley, daughter of George Kenley, and by this union there were 13 children, nine of whom are yet living: William H., the present clerk of the Kane Baptist church, lives at home, and manages the farm; Belle, wife of James Eldred, lives in Macoupin county; Jane, living at home; Mary, wife of George Parker, lives in Macoupin county; Ella, Sarah, Ida, Charles and Nora. The deceased are: John, Sarah Fannie, and an infant. On March 22, 1883, Mr. Hunter died and was buried in Kane cemetery. He was a good, industrious man, an affectionate father, and a kind husband, and his loss was deeply felt by all. The family are members of the Baptist church at Kane.

First Items

     The first grist mill in the county was erected in Jersey township in 1828 by Gershom Patterson. It stood right east of what is now known as the John Brown place. It was operated by a tread-mill, run by cattle. The capacity was not extensive, and after running a number of years, the mill was allowed to go to decay. “Major” Patterson, as he was called, also had a distillery on his place, erected in 1828 or 1829, by means of which he manufactured peach brandy in considerable quantities. This also went to decay, the most valuable part of the plant being sold. This was also over the line in English township.
     First school in Jersey township was in 1828 in the dooryard of Thomas English. It was taught by a man named John Sloan, who was stopping at Mr. E’s house.
     The first burial in Jersey township occurred in 1821. A man by the name of Helmbold, attempting to enter a well on the farm of Gershom Patterson in English township, which was full of mephitic air, and was suffocated. He was buried near the line between the two townships.

Education

     The first school house in district No. 2 was erected at an early day. It was a frame structure, 16 x 24, and cost $234.17. Mrs. Corey was the first teacher. She had about 40 pupils. In 1848 the old building, having outlived its usefulness, was removed and another erected in its stead. John Cowan was the contractor. The first teacher in this building was David Peabody. J. T. Grimes deeded the school lot to the district on condition that the school building should remain there. The edifice at present used was erected in 1876. It is 24 x 36 feet in dimensions, and cost, with the furniture, $900. The cost of maintaining the school is $250 per year. Eight months’ school is held each year. The average attendance is 15.
     The Spencer school house, in district No. 10 was erected in 1865, at a cost of $1,400. It is 22 x 28 feet in dimensions.

Jerseyville

     In 1822 John Ballard settled near the middle of the west line of the northwest quarter of section 21, and there built a cabin. This cabin has been destroyed for over half a centry, and the place where it stood is now surrounded by an apple orchard. The place belongs to the widow of Abijah Davis and is occupied by her and the family of her son-in-law, Nathaniel L. Kirby, as a residence property. For a long time after the old house had fallen to decay, a pile of stones, which had formed the fire-lace and chimney, and a little hillock marked the site; but now there is not a mark of any kind to indicate the place where stood the first house of the fair city of Jerseyville.
     Ballard was a typical pioneer, and was one of those who longed to be in advance of civilization. He was, in accordance with his backwoods training, of a superstitious nature, and he is remembered by some of the early residents for the charms he would sometimes wear to ward off ‘bad luck.’ At an early shooting match, a kind of pastime indulged in at that time, he wore his vest wrong side out, and held tight to his gun all day, giving as a reason, on being questioned, that such was necessary to enable him to win the prize. He left this location in 1825, moved to a point north of Jerseyville, on a creek, which took the name of Ballard’s branch, but which is now known as Dorsey’s branch. He remained at this place only a short time. Nothing is known by the early settlers, now surviving, of Ballard’s movements after leaving this region.
     James Falkner, who had been living on section 31 in what is now Jersey township, came up and bought Ballard’s Hickory Grove place in 1826, before the latter left it. He came up with his family, and took possession of the house. In 1827 he built what was known as the “Red House,” which stood on the site of P. D. Cheney’s elegant residence on North State street. He then removed to a tract of land on the “Platte purchase,” near St. Joseph, Mo., where he died in 1840. Andrew Sweeney and James Hamilton were the constructors of the “Red House.”
     A. L. Carpenter came to this place in 1830 and bought the “Red House” and other property from Falkner. When the town was laid out in 1834, Carpenter was running the “Red House” tavern and keeping the stage station. Carpenter was from the state of Ohio. He moved to Macoupin county in 1839. Carpenter resided here about a year before entering any land, which he eventually did, on section 20.
     N. L. Adams came to the present site of Jerseyville in Jan. 1833. He was a native of Windham county, Vt., born Feb. 3, 1796. He was the son of Levi and Dolly Adams, both natives of Massachusetts. He was married and settled here on a farm in the south part of the city of Jerseyville. He followed various occupations, but made farming his principal business. He built the first steam mill in Jerseyville in 1849, which had two run of buhrs, and, at the time of its completion, was considered the best in this part of the state. When he came here there was only one family living at Hickory Grove, that of A. L. Carpenter, Ballard and Falkner having moved away ere this.
     The name of Hickory Grove attached to the little settlement in the early days, and even after the name of Jerseyville was formerly given, many of the old settlers were in the habit of speaking of it by its old appellation.
     Lindsey H. English entered 40 acres of the land on which Jerseyville now stands, and in 1831 disposed of it to John Evans, of Carrollton, for $80, thus losing on the investment. Evans sold this tract, in the spring of 1834, to Jonathan W. Lott and Edward M. Daley for $475. These gentlemen laid off a town on this tract on Oct. 1, 1834. Lott was a New Jersey man, and when the question of naming the town was raised, he proposed that of Jerseyville. A number of other names were offered by others interested, but so strong was Lott in his preference for a name in honor of his state, that “Jerseyville” was agreed on as its final appellation. Invitations to be present on this occasion were sent out to the farmers of the surrounding country, and nine of them were present, including Col. Murray Cheney. Refreshments of a liquid nature were partaken of by those present who indulged in that form of pleasure. The place of procuring those beverages was at the old Red House. A. L. Carpenter, the occupant, kept a sort of tavern in that house, and across the stage road was the barn, for the accommodation of the stage horses. Mrs. Carpenter was not a believer in anything stronger than tansy for other than medicinal purposes, but this did not prevent her liege lord from having a moderate supply of something more ardent in the stable. And here, travelers were accustomed to get something to drink, as did those gathered on the occasion mentioned.
     In the summer of 1834 Rescarrick and Enos Ayres came to the site of the new town, and the former, in company with Messrs. Lott and Daley, purchased 40 acres of land from A. L. Carpenter.
     Enos Ayres, one of those mentioned, is now a resident of Chicago. Like Mr. Lott, the Ayres were from New Jersey, and with him, they were in favor of the name of Jerseyville. Col. Daley was from New York.
     George W. Burke, now the oldest living resident among the old settlers of the town, came to that point in 1834 and located.
     Soon after the survey was completed, Lott and Daley erected a building and started a store, which was the first in the town. Horatio N. Belt was the builder of this store. The firm did not continue long in the mercantile business, however, for in 1835 they disposed of their stock of goods to George Collins and Benjamin Yates, who carried on the general merchandise business for several years, under the firm name of Collins & Yates.
     Adam Clendennen and Edward Coles started a small store about 1837, but afterwards closed out the business.The selection of Jerseyville as the county seat, on the setting off of the county in 1839, gave a great impetus to its growth, and from that time to the present, its growth has been steady and substantial.
     The first blacksmith to start a blacksmith shop in Jerseyville was George W. Burke. He came here in 1834, finding at that time but six families. He has remained ever since, and has lived to see a prosperous city grow out of what was then scarcely a hamlet.
     The second representative in this line was Stephen Herron, who commenced business in the latter part of 1835. He afterward moved to Grafton, and later died there.
     The next blacksmith in Jerseyville was John M. Smith, who located here in 1836. He was born in Monmouth county, N.J., Jan. 5, 1811. He came to White Hall, Ill. in 1835, and worked at his trade there until coming to Jerseyville. In 1841 he moved to a farm east of the city, retiring from the further pursuit of his trade.

Present Business Interests

     The dry goods interest is prominently represented by B. C. VanDervoort. The business was established in 1859, in a frame building which stood on the present site of J. C. Darby’s grocery store. He continued business at that place until 1867, when he erected his present edifice. It is built of brick, is 25 x 85 feet in ground area, and cost $7,500. At the time of changing the location, I. W. Beardslee came in as part proprietor, remaining in the from about three years, when he retired. Since that time Mr. VanDervoort has been sole proprietor. He handles staple and fancy dry goods, carpets, curtains, boots and shoes, etc. His stock is valued at about $10,000.
     B. C. VanDervoort, one of the leading dry goods merchants of Jerseyville, is a native of Somerset county, N.J., born Dec. 29, 1821. His parents were Benjamin and anna (TenEyck) VanDervoort. The subject of this sketch was brought up on a farm, and educated in the common schools. On attaining his majority he left the farm and went to Patterson, N.J., where he commenced mercantile life, as a clerk in the store of his brother, with whom he continued seven years as clerk, then became a partner in the firm and remained there until 1858. In that year he moved to Jerseyville, Ill. Here he first purchased a farm, on which he lived less than two years. In 1859 he abandoned farming and established his present business. Mr. Van Dervoort was married in 1852 to Phebe Ann Beardslee, a native of Sussex county, N.J., where their marriage took place. Mr. and Mrs. VanDervoort are the parents of three children, only one of whom is now living, Emma J., wife of George F. Edgar. One died at the age of 12, and the other at the age of 18 years. Mr. and Mrs. VanDervoort are members of the First Presbyterian church. He is a republican in politics, and was a delegate to the state republican convention in 1856.
     Smith & Warren, dealers in dry goods, notions, boots and shoes, etc., commenced business Sept. 9, 1881, and continued until April 1882, when J. K. Smith, of the firm, died. The stock is valued at about $15,000, and occupies a store-room 25 x 85 feet, in the new brick block of G. W. Herdman.
     Mark A. Warren, son of Hon. George E. and Hattie S. (Allen) Warren, was born near Jerseyville, Ill., Dec. 8, 1851. He remained with his parents until he attained his majority, being reared on a farm. He was educated in the country and city schools of Jersey county, and subsequently took a course at the business college at Jacksonville. He then, in the fall of 1872, began his business career as clerk in the dry goods store of Lovell & Smith, with whom he continued one year. The firm then dissolved partnership, and Mr. Warren became associated in business with Henry Lovell, his brother-in-law and former employer. They carried on the dry goods business about three years. At the expiration of that time, Mr. Warren withdrew from the firm and returned to the employ of J. Knox Smith, who soon afterwards, on account of failing health, sold the business to F. W. Smith & Co., for whom Mr. Warren clerked until Sept. 1880. At that date he formed a partnership with J. Knox Smith, and again engaged in the dry goods business, the firm being Smith & Warren. They occupied a store on the old Herdman corner. In April 1882 Mr. Smith died, but his widow continued to hold his interest in the business. In November 1884 the store was destroyed by fire, and they carried on business in a small building until September 1885, when they moved into a new store built by G. W. Herdman. They now carry a full and complete stock of dry goods, boots and shoes, and gent’s furnishing goods. Mr. Warren was married in Sept. 1874 to Gracie Ferguson of Jerseyville. They are the parents of two children, Fay and Harry. Mr. Warren is a republican in politics, but has no political aspirations, perferring to devote his time to business. The firm of Smith & Warren has an extensive trade, and conducts one of the leading dry goods establishments of the city.
     Trepp, Schmieder & Co. are leading dealers in dry goods, clothing, hats and caps, boots and shoes, etc. The business was established by Gustav Trepp and Charles Schmieder in Oct. 1882. In April 1884 Benjamin Barnett was taken into the partnership, making the present firm. They have a large store, well stocked, and are known as enterprising business men.
     Charles Schmieder was born in Ichenheim, Baden, Sept. 5, 1852. His parents, John and Magdalena Schmieder, resided on a farm. Charles attended school until 13 years of age, then spent three years at college, receiving a liberal education. He then began his business career as a clerk in a general store. In June 1871 he came to the United States and settled in Jerseyville, Jersey county, Ill., where he remained one year, engaged in clerking in a dry goods store. He then went to New York city, and there resided nine years. At the expiration of that period he returned to Jerseyville, and in partnership with Gustav Trepp, established their present business. Mr. Schmieder was married in New York city in 1876 to Otelia Molinet, a native of that city. They have one daughter, Theresa. Mr. Schmieder is a member of the German Catholic church. His parents came to the United States in the fall of 1871 and settled near Fieldon, in this county, on a farm where they still live. They have, besides the subject of this sketch, two other children: Joseph, a farmer of Piasa township; and Theresa, the wife of Peter Blaeser.
     Among the prominent dealers in dry goods, notions, etc. in the city is the firm of D. G. and H. N. Wyckoff.
     David G. Wyckoff, son of John and Eleanor (Gray) Wyckoff, was born in Schoharie county, N.Y., May 5, 1812. At the age of 14 years he went to the city of New York, where he learned the tailor’s trade. He was married at Newark, N.J. in 1833 to Phebe Eliza Bonnell, a native of New York city. Four years later he came to Illinois and settled in what is now Jersey county, locating at Delhi, where he followed his trade until about 1840. He then came to Jerseyville and continued working at his trade until 1849, and during the time also carried on merchant tailoring. At that time he formed a partnership with John E. Rundle, and established a general mercantile business, of which in 1850 he became sole proprietor, and continued the same until Oct. 1865. His son, Horatio N. Wyckoff then became his partner, since which time the firm has been known as D. G. & H. N. Wyckoff. They carry a full and complete stock of dry goods, boots and shoes. Mr. Wyckoff abandoned the grocery trade in 1861. The store is located on the same ground on which he located in 1843. The present building is the third built on the same site, and was erected in 1871. It is a brick structure, 17 x 53 feet in dimensions, and two stories in height. During the present year, 1885, another building is being erected near the first, of still more commodious dimensions, it being 25 x 75 feet. Mrs. Wyckoff died in 1851, leaving six children: Catherine E., Horatio N., Mary A., George E., Cornelia J. and Francis E.
     Horatio N. Wyckoff is a native of Sussex county, N.J., born June 29, 1836. He is a son of David G. Wyckoff. He came to Illinois with his parents when one year old, and has since that time been a resident of Jersey county. In 1857 he commenced the study of law, under the tuition of A. L. Knapp, and in 1861 was admitted to the bar. He practiced his profession four years, at the expiration of which time he became a partner in his father’s business. October 2, 1866, Mr. Wyckoff was married to Elizabeth VanDorn, of New Jersey. They have four children living: Nellie G., Mary A., David A. and Theresa E. The firm of D. G. & H. N. Wyckoff is well known as being enterprising and perfectly reliable, and is one of the oldest business houses in the city of Jerseyville.
     Leon Engel is a leading representative of the trade in clothing, gents’ furnishing foods, hats and caps, etc. He commenced business Sept. 15, 1880, and has enjoyed prosperity in his trade. His salesroom has an area of 20 x 50 feet in which he carries a stock that would invoice $8,000.
     Leon Engel, a merchant of Jerseyville, was born in Prussia in 1858, a son of Henry and Rachel (Harmetz) Engel, both natives of Prussia. Leon received a good education in the old country, and resided there until he was 20 years of age. In 1878 he came to America, landing at Boston, Mass., where he remained five weeks. He then went to St. Louis, Mo., and engaged as a clerk in a gents’ furnishing goods store, remaining in that city 15 months. At the end of that time he went to Carrollton, Greene county, Ill., where for 10 months he clerked in a clothing store. Sept. 15, 1880 he came to Jerseyville, and opened a clothing and gents’ furnishing goods store on Main street, which business he still continues. He is a genial and pleasant gentleman, and since coming here has built up a good and constantly increasing trade.
     The Golden Fleece clothing and gents’ furnishing goods store was opened in 1881, with James Levy as manager, in the store formerly occupied by Frank Smith. They carry a large stock of goods in the lines mentioned.
     The clothing and boot and shoe business of S. A. Holmes, on the southwest corner of State and Pearl streets, was established by Conkling & Lipe in 1869. In 1874 Mr. Conkling sold his interest to S. A. Holmes, the firm thus becoming Lipe & Holmes. In 1884 S. A. Holmes became sole proprietor.
     H. Scheffer & Son, dealers in boots and shoes, occupy two store rooms on North State street. The business was established in March 1880 by the present firm. Besides their selling department, they also have a custom shop, in which boots and shoes of all grades are made to order. The latter department was instituted in 1860 by H. Scheffer. The salesroom has a floor area of 18 x 55 feet, while the shop has a frontage of 10 feet and a depth of 40. A large stock of goods in this line is kept on hand, which will invoice $7,000.
     H. Scheffer, boot and shoe dealer, was born in Prussia, April 20, 1827, his parents being Frederick and Elizabeth (Kotter) Scheffer. At the age of 14 he was apprenticed to learn the shoemaker’s trade, and served three years, after which he followed his trade until he attained his majority, then entered the German army, continuing in the service three years. At the expiration of that period he resumed his trade and followed the same until 1858, at which time he immigrated to America, landing at New Orleans on May 26 of that year. He proceeded to St. Louis, then to Alton, then to Jerseyville, where he established the business in which he is now engaged. He was married June 6, 1858 to Mary Bertman, who was born in Prussia. They are the parents of three children: Frederick, who is a partner in his father’s business; Henry, who is a clerk in his father’s store; and Lillie, living at home. Mr. Scheffer is the owner of his store building, a residence and two lots in the city of Jerseyville. He is a member of the Catholic church, of which he has been a trustee for two years.
     Marston & Halliday exclusively handle groceries, provisions, crockery, etc. They established the business in 1873 on N. State street. Their salesroom is 23 x 60 feet in dimensions. They carry a stock representing a money value of $5,000.
     Joseph G. Marston was born in the city of Philadelphia, April 15, 1837, and came with the family to Jersey county in 1842. He has been a resident here since that date, with the exception of three years, during which he attended school in Philadelphia. After finishing his education he began mercantile life as clerk, serving in stores in Jerseyville, Otterville and Alton. In 1867 he located at Jerseyville, and in partnership with C. M. Hamilton, engaged in the grocery business, the firm name being Hamilton & Marston. In 1872 Mr. Marston withdrew from the firm, and in association with Henry T. Nail, succeed J. C. Darby in the grocery trade. In June 1873 Mr. Marston withdrew from this partnership and became associated with L. H. Halliday, establishing the present firm of Marston & Halliday. They carry a full and complete stock of groceries, provisions, queensware, etc. In 1868 Mr. Marston was married to Adaline Cadwalader. Mr. Marston is a member of the Blue Lodge, Chapter, Council and Commandery, in the Masonic order, and an officer of the Grand Lodge of the state.
     Jacob Wagner is engaged in the grocery and provision trade. Krumpanitzky Bros. opened the establishment about 1865 and continued until succeeded by Wagner in 1879.
     C. M. Boyle carries on three lines of trade, grocery store, ice trade and bottling business. He commenced the bottling business in 1868, and his grocery store was established in 1875.
     M. C. Reynolds commenced the grocery business in May 1885. His salesroom is 20 x 50 feet.
     The “Famous” grocery store business was established in February 1881 by Hall & Nevius. This partnership continued until February 1885, when Mr. Hall retired from the firm. Henry Nevius conducted the business until Aug. 1885, when he sold to Fred Armstrong, the present proprietor.
     J. C. Darby, a leading representative of the grocery trde of Jerseyville, commenced the business in 1867, in a small frame structure which stood on the site of his present store edifice. In 1870 the present commodious brick structure occupied by Mr. Darby was erected by B. C. Vandervoort. It covers an area 25 x 85 feet, and is two stories in height. In the spring of 1872 the business was purchased by Marston & Nail. This firm continued one year, when Mr. Marston retired from it. After one year, J. C. Darby again became interested in it, purchasing a half interest from Mr. Nail. This partnership lasted two years, when H. T. Nail retired, since which time Mr. Darby has been sole proprietor. He carries an assortment of groceries which will invoice $3,000.
     John C. Darby, one of the oldest business men of Jerseyville, is a son of William and Deborah A. Darby. He was born in Essex county, N.J., Nov. 9, 1829. His early life was spent on a farm, and later in his fathers’ grist mill. In 1850 he came to Illinois, and engaged as clerk in a store in Jerseyville. In 1852 he became associated with A. B. Morean in the general mercantile business, the firm being styled J. C. Darby & Co. This partnership lasted until March 1856, when Mr. Darby sold his interest in the store, and purchased a farm one mile east of Jerseyville, on which he resided for the next eight years. He then sold his farm and returned to Jerseyville, and bought an interest in the grocery business of John E. Sanford, better known as Major Sanford, under the firm name of Sanford & Darby. This partnership continued two years, at the expiration of which Mr. Darby sold his interest to his partner, but soon afterward, associated with George Hodgkin, purchased the business of Mr. Sanford, and carried on the same one year. Mr. Darby then became sole proprietor, and continued in the business alone until 1872. He then sold out to Marston & Nail. In 1873 he established a new business on State street, which in 1874 he sold out, and purchased an interest in his former business, becoming the partner of Mr. Nail. Two years later Mr. Darby purchased the interest of his partner, and has since continued business alone. He was married in 1853 to Henrietta Whitehead. They have had four children, one of whom died at the age of seven years. Those now living are: Elva, wife of John Lowe; Charlotte and Maggie. Mr. Darby was the first telegraph operator in Jersey county, having had charge of the office in 1853-54. He is a member of the First Presbyterian church, also of the I.O.O.F. and the Knights of Honor.
     William Darby was born in Essex county, N.J. in 1804. He was brought up on a farm, and in 1828 married Deborah A. Squier, a native of Morris county, N.J. After marriage Mr. Darby continued to reside on his farm until 1849, when he sold it and purchased a grist mill, which he operated until 1853. In that year he came to this state to visit his son, and being pleased with the country, moved to Jersey county the following year, 1854. He purchased 240 acres of land on section 2, Mississippi township, and engaged in farming. In the fall of 1854 Mrs. Darby died, leaving four children: John C., Jacob S., Levi R., and Chatherine [sic?]. Mr. Darby subsequently married Charlott Woodruff of Essex county, N.J., and continued farming until his death in March 1873. His wife’s death occurred in 1884. Mr. Darby was in comfortable circumstances when he came to this county, and prospered in his undertakings here. Although no longer strong to accumulate wealth, he desired to live in comfort, and to give his children financial aid in starting out in life, which he was able to do. He was a man of simple habit, and one who gave little attention to anything outside of his own private affairs. He was for 40 years a consistent member of the Baptist church.
     The Hamilton Grocer Co. is the name of one of the firms doing business in Jerseyville. The business was established on State street by C. M. Hamilton in 1859. In 1862 he moved to the location of the present store. He carried on the business alone for some time, when the title was changed to Hamilton & Locke. They were succeeded by Hamilton & Marston, and this firm by Hamilton & Son. After this E. A. Hamilton became the sole proprietor. The present company succeeded to the business Sept. 15, 1884. Their salesroom is 19 x 50 feet in area, with additional storage room in the rear, 40 x 50 feet in size. The stock will invoice about $3,500.
     Clarence M. Hamiton, a prominent business man of Jerseyville, was born in Franklin county, Vt., June 5, 1826. He is the seventh child of William and Lydia Hamilton. The death of Mrs. Hamilton, formerly Lydia Trask, occurred May 10, 1828. Mr. Hamilton, with his family of three sons, immigrated west in the fall of 1830 and settled in the present limits of Jersey county, on the northeast quarter of Sec. 13, T7, R12, W. of the 3rd P.M., where he improved a farm and followed that business during the remainder of his active life. He was an active, energetic man and highly esteemed by all who were really acquainted with his virtues. His brother, Dr. Silas Hamilton, was also one of the pioneer settlers, who was noted for his philanthropy and liberal provision in behalf of the citizens of Otter Creek, now Otterville, and the educational facilities he furnished the settlement were not surpassed in the early settlement of western towns. William Hamilton died at the residence of Jeptha Dixon in Calhoun county, July 22, 1849. The subject of this sketch received his early education in Otterville, this county. He followed farming in his early life, except one year, which time he devoted to mining in the lead mines of Wisconsin. He began his mercantile career in the spring of 1847 at Gilead, Calhoun county, Ill. He sold out to his brother, W. D. Hamilton, in March 1849, and for two years was engaged as deputy sheriff of Calhoun county. In the spring of 1857 he associated in the firm of Child & Hamilton at Hardin, Calhoun county, in merchandise, officiating meanwhile as county surveyor, to which office he was elected; and also, the same year, appointed assessor of Calhoun county by the county court, and performed the duties of said office. He was the same year elected justice of the peace, and filled the office until his removal from the county. The firm of Child & Hamilton was dissolved in the spring of 1853, and the following summer Mr. H. moved to Jerseyville, where he has since resided. He first engaged in the dry goods and grocery trade. After a short time he became a member of the firm of Bagley, Hurd & Co., in which business he continued until Aug. 1856, when he became a member of the firm of Johnson & Hamilton in the livery business. He disposed of his interest in the mercantile house in the fall of the same year, and disposed of his interest in the livery business in May 1857. About this time he was elected alderman, and also city clerk. During the summer of 1857 he settled his brother’s estate in Calhoun county. In March 1859 he was engaged in the firm of Hamilton & Jett, in the wholesale and retail grocery business, which he continued until June 1860, when he became sole proprietor, continuing until June 1865, when he accepted Morris R. Locke as a partner, and continued the business under the firm name of Hamilton & Locke, until Oct. 1866, when he bought out Mr. Locke, continuing the business alone until 1867. Mr. Hamilton accepted Joseph G. Marston as a partner, and continued in the firm of Hamilton & Marston until Oct. 1871, when he bought out the interest of Mr. Marston, and associated his son, Edward A. Hamilton, and as the firm of Hamilton & Son, continued the business until 1873, when the firm was changed to E. A. Hamilton, the son becoming sole proprietor. Thus the business was continued until 1884, when it became the “Hamilton Grocery Company,” being incorporated under the State law, with capital stock of $5,000, divided in shares of $100 each. C. M. Hamilton is the president and treasurer, and his son, C. E. Hamilton, secretary. In addition to his mercantile interests at Jerseyville, Mr. Hamilton in 1861 opened a store at Otter Creek, now Otterville. Subsequently he associated in business with himself at that point S. R. Rogers, and under the firm name of Hamilton & Rogers continued in business there until 1875. Mr. Hamilton commenced pork packing at Jerseyville on his own account in the fall fo 1862, and has since that time made quite a reputation in that line of trade. In addition to his election in 1857 as alderman and city clerk, he was re-elected to both positions in 1859, and elected alderman in 1871, and has since that time served in the same capacity one or two years. Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton have had seven children, four of whom are now living: E. A., Emily E., Clarence E., and Alta. Politically he affiliates with the republican party. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. and with his wife a member of the M.E. church. As a citizen he is benevolent and public-spirited, and stands among the best business men of the county.
     The grocery business of L. D. Cory was established in 1874 by L. D. and J. E. Cory. In the spring of 1883, J. E. Cory withdrew from the firm, and L. D. then became sole proprietor.
     John Wiley is a representative of the grocery trade. He carries a stock worth $3,500.
     Theo. F. Remer is a leading representative of the drug business of Jerseyville. The business was established by B. M. Krumpanitzky and Theo. F. Remer in the fall fo 1873. The store was then in the old building of Wallace Leigh on State street. In Feb. 1879 Mr. Krumpanitzky retired from the firm, and since that time the present proprietor has continued the business alone. He handles drugs, stationery, papers, etc., and has a very extensive trade, which has been steadily built up since the opening of the business.
     Theo. F. Remer, son of Abram and Deborah (Nutt) Remer, was born in Morris county, N.J., May 15, 1844. In 1856 the family moved to Illinois and settled in Jerseyville. Theo. F. Remer completed his education at the seminary of Mrs. L. M. Cutting, being the only boy in the school. In 1861 he started for the Pacific slope, and remained there about two and a half years. He then returned to Jerseyville, and engaged in mercantile life as clerk in the dry goods store of William Shephard, with whom he remained until 1866. He then became clerk for White & Van Horne, druggists, serving in that capacity seven years. At the expiration of that period he engaged in business for himself, first with B. M. Krumpanitzky as partner, but since 1877 has carried on business alone. Mr. Remer was married in Sept. 1868 to Elizabeth K. Voorhees, a daughter of Peter P. and Maria Voorhees, and a native of Jersey county. Mr. Remer casts his vote with the democratic party, but takes little interest in politics. He is a member of the First Presbyterian church, also of the Masonic fraternity.
     G. R. Smith & Co. are among the drug dealers of Jerseyville. The business was established in 1836 by Alex. B. Morean. He was succeeded by White & Ware. For a few years the firm continued thus, when Mr. White dropped out. G. W. Ware, who then became sole proprietor, was succeeded in 1882 by the present firm. Their building is 22 feet wide by 60 in depth. It was erected in 1856 at a cost of $6,000. It is two stories in height. The stock carried is valued at $8,000.
     Greg R. Smith, son of A. H. and Amanda (Robinson) Smith, was born at Kane, Greene county, Ill., July 1, 1857. He was educated in the schools of Carrollton, and subsequently learned the drug business from his father and older brothers. In 1882 he came to Jerseyville and succeeded G. W. Ware in the drug business, the firm now being G. R. Smith & Co. His brother, Edward Smith, is his partner. They also have a drug store in Carrollton. Mr. Smith is a member of the society of Knights of Pythias.
     J. S. Daniels is one of the leading representatives of the hardware trade in Jerseyville. He conducts business in a strictly first-class manner, deals honorably, and hence has a large trade. He keeps stoves, tools, shelf and heavy hardware, guns, ammunition, etc., and carries the largest line of steel goods in the county.
     Eaton & Crawford are also engaged in the hardware trade. The business was established by J. H. Ames in 1865. He was succeeded by A. H. Barnett & Co. who in April 1885 disposed of the business to the present proprietors.
     J. E. Cory commenced the hardware business in Sept. 1883.
     Oscar Hill handles books, stationery, newspapers and other publications, and fancy goods. The store was commenced by Howard Cutting about the year 1876. Two years later he was succeeded by W. S. Bowman, and in 1879 the present proprietor assumed control. His stock is valued at about $2,000, handled in a salesroom 16 x 40 feet in floor area.
     Oscar Hill, son of Robert L. Hill, was born in Carrollton, Greene county, Ill., Dec. 28, 1836. In 1838 Robert L. Hill moved with his family to Jersey county, and settled on a farm near Jerseyville. The same farm now comprises a portion of the present city of Jerseyville. Here Oscar grew to manhood and in 1860 was married to A. Lizzie French, daughter of Rev. D. P. French. In 1862 he moved to Greenville, Bond county, Ill., where his father-in-law was principal of Almira College. Here Mr. Hill furnished supplies for the school and Mrs. Hill taught music. In Nov. 1864 Mrs. Hill died, leaving two children, Herbert L. and Charles F. The elder is now living in St. Louis, but the younger died at the age of two years. After the death of his wife Mr. Hill remained in Greenville only until the close of the term of school, then returned to Jerseyville and resumed farming on the homestead. May 20, 1870 he was married to Addie Miskell, daughter of J. H. Miskell. In 1873 his mother died, and as the homestead was then divided among the heirs, Mr. Hill moved to the village of Jerseyville, where he engaged in clerking until 1878. In that year he succeeded M. L. Hill & Co. in a book, stationery and fancy goods business, which he still continues. He had by his second marriage four children, two of whom are living, Nellie B. and Minnie C. Mr. Hill is a democrat in politics, but takes no more interest than merely to vote. His religious connection has been with the Baptist church since 1855.
     Max R. Beatty established a news depot in the postoffice building July 20, 1882, which he still continues.
     H. A. Tunehorst commenced the handling of musical instruments and jewelry in 1877.
     John E. Boynton, the leading jeweler of this section, commenced business here in 1875. He carries a well selected stock valued at $5,000, of jewelry, silverware, clocks, etc. His salesroom is 18 x 50 feet in floor area, and is fitted up in excellent style. He does a large business, and is enjoying the result of a lifetime of steady adherence to strict business rules, straight dealing and rare ability as a mechanic in his line.
     John E. Boynton, jeweler, is a son of Noah and Lucinda (Vinton) Boynton, both natives of Vermont. They reared a family of nine children: Andrew P., Eben V., Permelia, Harvey L., Samuel B., Louisa S., William N., Sophronia E., and John E. All of the sons learned the jeweler’s trade, and each enlisted in the U. S. service, in a different regiment, some one of them participating in every battle of the civil war. John E. Boynton was born in Stephenson county, Ill., May 10, 1848. He commenced to learn his trade at the age of 12 years, following the same until 1862, when he enlisted in Co. H., 31st Wis. Inf., and served until the close of the war. He took part in all of the engagements of his company. He returned from the service to Galena, Ill., and finished learning his trade with his brother Andrew. In 1869 he went to Manchester, Ia., and there worked with his brother William until 1872. He then went to Lincoln, Neb. In 1874, when the grasshoppers appeared in that state, he moved to Alton, Ill., from whre he came to Jerseyville at the time before stated. He has twice lost a portion of his stock by fire, and had no insurance. He is now located in the old Wyckoff store, where he carries the largest stock of jewelry in Jersey county. Mr. Boynton was married in 1876 to Maria L. Beaty, daughter of John Beaty. They have two children, William P. and John E. He is a republican politically and a member of the Masonic fraternity.
     R. E. Mayer carries a stock of jewelry in the store room with Leon Engel. He commenced the business in May 1883, moving to his present location in Nov. 1884.
     Charles C. Borger also carries on the jewelry business, which he established in Sept. 1884.
     S. M. Titus & Co., dealers in general merchandise, have been carrying on this business since Nov. 1882, the date of its establishment.
     The livery stable of E. A. R. Myers, Jr., originated with Charles H. Bowman, who built the present structure. On July 29, 1880 it became the property of Myers & Brown, and subsequently Mr. Myers purchased the interest of his partner and is the sole proprietor. The building, which is a fine brick one, is 44 x 100 feet in ground area, two stories high. Fifteen head of horses and buggies, carriages, etc., to correspond are used in the business.
     E. A. R. Myers, Jr., son of E. A. R. and Caroline (Manning nee Vance) Myers, was born in Scott county, Va., May 21, 1850. When he was very young his parents moved to St. Louis county, Mo., and 15 years later to Franklin county, of the same state, where they engaged in farming. The subject of this sketch in 1866 entered a grocery store as clerk, and during the four years following was engaged in the same capacity in a drug, and also a dry goods store. In 1870 he returned to Franklin county, and there farmed until 1878. At that date he came to Jerseyville, and here for two years followed farming. He then engaged in the livery business which he still continues. He was married in Feb. 1878 to Celestia P. Brown, a native of Franklin county, Mo. They have had one child, now deceased. Mr. Myers is a member of the Knights of Pythias society.
     M. Cockrell has a well equipped livery barn on State street. He succeeded Pat Herrington. When he took charge of the stable in 1883, it was pretty well run down. At that time the equipment consisted of but five horses and four buggies. Now there are twelve horses, and the barn is well supplied with buggies, barouches, etc., suitable for a first-class livery business. The stable was established by Henry Johnson about 1850.
     Moses Cockrell, son of Moses and Caty Ann (Utt) Cockrell, was born in Mississippi township, Dec. 31, 1854. His early life was spent on his father’s farm. At the age of 17 he entered the employ of his brother Elias, who was then in the grain business in Jerseyville. After five years work by the month, he became a partner in the lumber business, the firm name being known as E. Cockrell & Bro. This partnership lasted four years. In 1880 he established a coal and lumber yard at Kane, and succeeded Chas. Smalley in the coal business in Jerseyville. In 1882 he withdrew from the firm of E. Cockrell & Bro., and in 1884 sold his lumber and coal yard at Kane to Jesse Cockrell. His is now in the livery, coal, and wire fence business in Jerseyville, having procured a patent on a machine for making wire fence. He is a live business man, and well known in the business community of Jersey and Greene counties.
     The confectionery and bakery of Wallace Leigh & Son was established by the first named in 1852, who conducted the same on State street, until the erection of the new building in 1874, which they now occupy. In 1881 the present firm was formed, Austin going in partnership with his father.
     Philip Block is the leading merchant tailor of this city, in fact is the only first-class representative of that line of business, who devotes his whole attention to it.
     Philip Block, merchant tailor at Jerseyville, established his present business in 1883, since which he has been a resident of this city. He was born in Austria, Jan. 30, 1847. He learned the tailor’s trade in his native country, and there followed the same until 1866. In the fall of that year he immigrated to America, landing in New York in October. He went at once to St. Louis, Mo., where he followed his trade about 18 months, then went to Centralia, Ill., and at first worked for other parties, but later formed a partnership with another gentleman, and engaged in merchant tailoring, continuing in business for a period of three years. At the expiration of that time he came to Jerseyville, where he is now the oldest and leading merchant tailor. Mr. Block was married in St. Louis in 1868 to Elizabeth Klein, also a native of Austria, who came to the United States in the spring of 1866. They are the parents of seven children: Morris, Louis, Alexander, Joseph, Edna Rose, Philip R., and Nona E.
     Mrs. C. A. Voorhees conducts a millinery and fancy goods store. Mrs. E. A. Terry commenced the business in March 1872, and was succeeded by Mrs. C. H. Durkee. The latter gave place to Mrs. Voorhees, Jan. 1, 1885.
     Mrs. A. B. Allen, milliner, commence business in 1875. In March 1885 she moved to her present quarters.
     F. W. Roerig commenced the manufacture of harness in Jerseyville in March 1883, purchasing the business of William Stoop. The latter was successor to Antoine Recappe, who established the business in 1859.
     Antoine Recappe is engaged in the sale of furniture and harness. He succeeded Carr & Tindall, who established the business.
     William Pilgar established himself in the harness business here in 1864, and is still engaged in trade.
     The Jerseyville Marble Works was established in 1869 by Haughtlin Bros. It is located on the corner of Jefferson and Arch streets.
     Among the professional men of Jerseyville are the two gentlemen who hang out their “shingles” as dentists, George S. Miles and Edward Flannigan. Both are well up professionally and doing a good business, but Mr. Miles being the much longer established has the larger following.
     George S. Miles, D.D.S., was born in Westminster, Mass., Oct. 13, 1832, the eldest of the three children of George and Lucinda Miles, who were lineal descendants of the Puritans. George Miles was by occupation a farmer. He died June 10, 1872. His widow died in January 1878. The subject of this sketch received his literary education at Westminster Academy, and was also a student at Hopkins Academy at Hadley, Mass. At the age of 21 he commenced the study of dentistry with Dr. T. S. Blood of Fitchburg, Mass., graduating in his profession about two years later. He practiced a short time in Salem, Mass. In August 1855 he came to Jersey county, Ill. and immediately after settled in Jerseyville, where he has since resided, engaged in the practice of his profession. Dr. Miles was married Aug. 2, 1859 to Mattie De Wolf Warren, a daughter of Hon. George E. and Hattie Warren. They have had six children, one of whom is deceased. Those living are: Herbert W., Clarence J., Chas. V., Clara G., and Harold B. Dr. Miles was president of the State Dental Society for the years 1874-75. He was one of the original stockholders and directors of the First National Bank of Jerseyville, and was connected with the same about three years. He then invested his money in real estate in the West and in Jersey county, and now owns 160 acres of land within a mile of the city of Jerseyville. Dr. Miles has been attended with success in the practice of his profession and stands among the leading dentists of the state. In 1867 the degree of D.D.S. was conferred on him by the Missouri Dental College. He is one of the recognized leaders of the republican party in Jersey county, and in the campaigns of 1872 and 1876 was chairman of the county central committee. He is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows fraternities, and at the present time is the representative of Jerseyville lodge No. 53, I.O.O.F., to the grand lodge. Dr. Miles’ son, Clarence, was married in June 1884 to Flora D. Cory, daughter of Levi D. Cory, of this city, and is now living at Salmon City, Kan., where he is engaged as book-keeper in the Farmer’s Bank.

Banking

     The first bank in Jerseyville was established by A. M. Blackburn in 1854. For a time he conducted the business alone, but in 1859 associated with him in the bank, William Shephard, Samuel L. Magill, and Alex. B. Morean. The firm name then became A. M. Blackburn & Co. It was afterward organized under the state law as the Jersey County Bank, A. M. Blackburn being president, and George R. Swallow, cashier. This bank invested largely in Tennessee state bonds, and on the breaking out of the war, the bonds depreciated to such an extent that it was compelled to suspend. The bank issued circulating notes. All debts were paid at the time of closing business.
     In 1859 Dr. Edward A. D’Arcy and P. D. Cheney established a bank and commenced business under the firm name of D’Arcy & Cheney. Until the liquidation of the Jersey County Bank, there were two such institutions in Jerseyville, but during the war D’Arcy & Cheney had the field to themselves. During those troublous times they were often in fear of raids by “bushwhackers,” and the bank building was kept well supplied with guns and ammunition, making a small arsenal. No such attack occurred however.
     In 1866 Hugh N. Cross and Col. George R. Swallow succeeded D’Arcy & Cheney. They were succeeded in 1872 by H. N. Cross, A. W. Cross, and W. E. Carlin, and under the firm name of Cross, Carlin & Co., conducted the business until 1876, when the First National Bank was established. The following were the principal stockholders, and also the original board of directors: A. W. Cross, H. N. Cross, W. E. Carlin, John C. Barr, James A. Locke, George S. Miles, and John N. English, Sr. H. N. Cross was chosen president, and W. E. Carlin was elected cashier. A. W. Cross, although the largest stockholder, accepted the position of assistant cashier. H. N. Cross served as president until his death, which occurred Nov. 21, 1883, when he was succeeded by his son, A. W. Cross, who still maintains that responsible position with ability and satisfaction to the directors, and with credit to himself. Of the original directors, the positions of H. N. Cross, John C. Barr and James A. Lock were vacated by death, and A. W. Cross is the only one of the original number, at present retaining the position of director. There are now 13 stockholders, of whom A. W. Cross retains a majority of stock. The present officer of the bank are as follows: A. W. Cross, president; Edward Cross, cashier; A. W. Cross, Edward Cross, John I. White, W. H. Fulkerson, Morris R. Locke, directors. Jan. 8, 1884 the articles of the association were changed, reducing the number of directors from seven to five. During the same year a new fire-proof vault was built, which contains 50 special private deposit boxes, each provided with keys, for individuals who lease them. The vault is also supplied with one of Diebold’s steel, burglar-proff safes, secured by a Yale time-lock. On organization this bank had a paid-up capital of $50,000, with authority for an increase to $150,000; its surplus is now $11,000, and undivided profits of $8,707. It is a good bank, a credit to Jersey county, and to its officers and directors.
     Hugh N. Cross was born Dec. 9, 1817 in Somerset county, N.J. His father, John L., was a native of the same county and state, and his ancestors had also resided there for many years. J. L. Cross was married twice, his first wife was Mary Kirkpatrick, by whom he had four children. After her death he was again married to Mary Nesbitt, by whom he had one child, Hugh N. Cross. The ancestors of Mr. Cross and wife were Scotch-Irish. His occupation was that of a farmer. In 1835 he moved with his family to Jersey county, Ill., locating on a farm south of the present thriving town of Jerseyville, Mr. Cross being over 70 years of age at the time of locating here. In 1850 he died at his residence at the advanced age of 82 years, the death of Mrs. Cross occurring some two years previous. Hugh N. Cross was educated in the common schools of his native state, attaining a good business education for those times. He came with his parents to this county in 1835, and remained with them on the farm until their death. When about 25 years of age he was united in marriage to Antoinette VanHorne, daughter of Col. Elijah and Mary Van Horne, who were formerly from New York, though they were early settlers in this county, having located here in 1833. Mrs. Cross was born in Schoharie county, N.Y. Mrs. Cross and wife were the parents of five children, three sons and two daughters. One daughter, Helen, died under 10 years of age; Mary N., the deceased wife of W. E. Carlin; Andrew Wilson, Edward, and Leslie. When Mr. Cross commenced life he was comparatively poor, but being a man of energy and good judgment in business matters, he acquired the possession of a handsome competence, the result of a life of frugality and perseverance. Until 1866, agricultural pursuits and stock-growing engrossed most of his time and attention, and during that year he formed a partnership with George R. Swallow, and together they opened quite an extensive banking house in Jerseyville, in which business he was constantly engaged until his death, Nov. 21, 1883, being president of the First National Bank at that time, a position he had held since its organization. He was among the earlies settlers of the county, and was always on of its most liberal, public spirited and enterprising citizens, being prominently connected with, and rendering liberal support to, many of the most important improvements in the community. In politics Mr. Cross was always a strong adherent to the principles of the democratic party, and religiously, he and his family were always prominent attendants, and liberal supporters of the Presbyterian church. His wife is still living and resides on the old homestead.
     Andrew Wilson Cross, son of Hugh N. and Antoinette (Van Horne) Cross, was born Mary 25, 1845, five miles southeast of the then village of Jerseyville, Ill. At this place he resided with his parents until Feb. 21, 1855, when they moved to the old residence, three miles north of said village, or town. Until 20 years of age his life was spent on a farm, where he was variously employed in duties incident to agricultural pursuits. He obtained his education in the schools of Jerseyville, two winters at Jacksonville, and a five months’ commercial course at Eastman’s college in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. In 1866 he entered Cross & Swallow’s bank as a clerk, continuing until 1870, when in company with his father and Major W. E. Carlin, he established the first bank at Mt. Vernon, Ill. In 1872 he sold his interest in the bank at Mt. Vernon, and returned to Jerseyville, when the firm of Cross & Swallow was succeeded by Cross, Carlin & Co., of which firm he was a member, Col. Swallow, now treasurer of the state of Colorado, then emigrating to that state. It is to be said of Cross & Swallow that they never had a written article of co-partnership, did not publish any notice of dissolution, and that there was never a dissenting word between them. In 1876 he was elected assistant cashier of the First National bank of this city, which institution he assisted in organizing. In 1880 he was elected cashier, and when his father died in 1883, he was unanimously called by the board of directors to accept the presidency, which position he still retains. He was one of the principals in the building of the Jerseyville elevator, and the St. Louis, Jerseyville & Springfield railroad, and as its treasurer, furnished credit and money in large amounts until the road was completed, to be turned over to the lessees. His father’s credit and excellent reputation put him in a position to make money, and he availed himself of the opportunity. He has made his own money, so that he is one of the solid men of the city, well worthy for the position of bank president. In 1872 he was married to Annie Barr, daughter of John C. and Mary W. Barr, residents of Jerseyville since 1840. She is a graduate of the renowned Monticello Seminary, and holds close allegiance to her many classmates. Mr. and Mrs. Cross have one child, Ida. They are members of the Presbyterian society. He is a member of the board of trustees, and was one of the building committee of the present commodious church of that organization, and attests, with that of others, his love of the cause, public spirit and good judgment.
     The banking house of Bowman & Ware was established by William Shephard & Co. in Feb. 1866. In Dec. 1877 this firm was succeeded by that of William Shephard & Son, and in 1875 by the present firm. They do a general banking business, attend to collections, etc.
     James R. Colean, teller in the bank of Bowman & Ware in this city, is a son of Nelson and Sarah J. (Waddle) Colean, natives of Illinois. He was born in Jersey county, March 13, 1857. He received a good education, attending the district schools of Jersey county, and in 1871 and 1872, Browder’s Institute at Olmstead, Ky., and two years at Blackburn University at Carlinville. After completing his education he returned to Jerseyville and on June 1, 1875, entered the employ of Bowman & Ware, with whom he has since remained. In the spring of 1879 he was appointed by J. I. McGready, who was then mayor of Jerseyville, city clerk and treasurer, which office he held two years, being at the time of his appointment, only 22 years of age. Mr. Colean is a young man of good ability and is highly popular with the best citizens of Jersey county. He was married Dec. 11, 1883 to Tilla, daughter of Samuel and Mary Bothwell of Jerseyville.
     The banking house of M. E. Bagley was organized Sept. 6, 1881 by W. E. Carlin and M. E. Bagley. The business was conducted under the firm name of Carlin & Bagley until March 1, 1885, when M. E. Bagley became sole proprietor and manager of the business.
     The banking house of J. A. Shephard & Co. was established Nov. 1, 1883 by the present proprietors. The firm consists of John A., A. M., and H. A. Shephard. This is a private bank, and one of the best of its kind in this locality, if not in this part of the state. A general banking business is transacted, collections made, loans negotiated, etc. The bank is also the office of the county treasurer, the senior Mr. Shephard being the present treasurer of the county.
     Hon. William Shephard is a native of Yorkshire, England, and was born in the town of Markington, near Ripon, August 10, 1816. At the age of 16 he immigrated to this country with his father, William Shephard, landing at New York in June 1832, and settling at Trenton, N.J. He was a shoemaker by trade, at which occupation he engaged for a short time, but soon turned his attention to canal and railroad enterprises. He began this branch of industry by working as a day laborer on the Raritan canal in New Jersey. He subsequently became a contractor on a limited scale, and moved to Lancaster county, Penn., where he remained about three years, and built the tunnel on the Harrisburg and Lancaster road. In the spring of 1838 he moved west, and for a short time was located in St. Louis, where he clerked in a livery stable. In autumn of the same year he moved to Coles county, Ill. where soon after he became a contractor under the state internal improvement system, on the Central Branch R.R., now a part of the Indianapolis R. R. His partners in this enterprise were Richard Johnson and David Dunsdon, both Englishmen, and old settlers of Jersey county. After the completion of his contract, Mr. Shephard became a citizen of Jersey county. His next contract was the excavation of the bluff at Grafton, preparatory to the making of a county road. He subsequently carried on business as a shoemaker at Jerseyville. In March 1840 he was married to Ann Maria Gross, of Dauphin county, Penn. She was the daughter of Adam and Elizabeth Gross. They have had nine children, seven of whom are living, two boys and five girls. The oldest son, Wm. V., died Feb. 15, 1875, in the 31st year of his age. The third son, Francis B., died in St. Louis while attending law school, April 28, 1876, age 24. He was a graduate of the Notre Dame University, Ind., and also of the Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N.Y., and was a young man of great promise. In 1847 Mr. Shephard engaged in merchandising in Grafton, in which business he continued until 1852, when he obtained a contract in connection with the building of the Missouri Pacific railroad. He was an original incorporator, and for many years president of the Jacksonville, St. Louis & Chicago railroad, and built the Louisiana branch of that road a few years since, and also an extension of that road from Dwight to Streator. In 1866 he was elected state senator from the district composed of the counties of Jersey, Greene, Calhoun, Scott and Pike, by the democratic party, and was re-elected in 1870, but resigned in 1871. In 1866 he established a private banking house in Jerseyville, which he conducted nine years with great success, and which he sold out in June 1875. In 1871 he was engaged largely in building railroads in Texas, in company with Col. J. A. Henry, of Joliet, and J. J. Mitchell, of St. Louis, where they built 300 miles of the Houston & Great Northern railroad. He was a gentleman of rare mental endowments, an of mature judgment, entirely self-made and eminently successful as a business man. He had, moreover, the respect, esteem and confidence of all who knew him, and especially of the citizens of Jerseyville, where he resided for 36 years. He died at his home in the midst of his family, Aug. 12, 1875. He was a devout member of the Roman Catholic faith, and has ever been a liberal supporter of the institutions of that church. He amassed a great fortune of over $300,000. Few men have had a more respectable career. His surviving sons are: John A., a banker; and Harry A., also banker. The daughters are all living, and Mrs. Shephard still survives. Mr. Shephard was a man of finer financial capacity than was ever known in this part of the state.
     John Adam Shephard, treasurer of the county of Jersey, is a son of William and Ann Maria (Gross) Shephard, and was born in Jerseyville March 21, 1847. He was educated in a Catholic school in St. Louis, including the classics, and in his younger years was engaged in a store in Jerseyville. From 1860 to 1867 he was a book-keeper for his father. From 1872 to 1875 he was in the banking business with his father, and was in the law and real estate business with A. A. Goodrich for three or four years. In the autumn of 1879 he was elected county treasurer to fill the unexpired term of Thomas O’Donnell. Mr. Shephard was re-elected in 1882, and is making a very acceptable and popular county official. He is a democrat in politics, as was his father before him, and it is but justice to say that all parties in Jersey county have unbounded confidence in his integrity. The funds of the county could not be in safer hands. Mr. Shephard is quite public spirited, and has been for a number of years the treasurer of the Jersey county fair, a truly prosperous organization. He is present alderman of the fourth ward, and has held that office a number of years. Jan. 16, 1878, he married Hattie Ely, daughter of George I. Ely, of Jerseyville, and this union has been blessed with two children, both daughters.
     Henry A. Shephard, youngest son of William and Ann M. (Gross) Shephard, was born in Jerseyville, May 17, 1858. He was educated at Notre Dame, Ind., and the high school of Jerseyville, subsequently taking a commercial course at St. Louis. In 1881 he entered the employ of Bowman & Ware, bankers, as clerk, serving them nine months. He then assisted his brother, John A. Shephard, in the office of county treasurer. In Nov. 1883 he engaged with his brother in banking, the firm being J. A. Shephard & Co., which he still continues. June 10, 1885, Mr. Shephard was married to Tillie Rivier (Allen). He is a democrat politically, as was his father before him. His religious connection is with the Roman Catholic church.
     A. W. Cadman was the first photographer in Jerseyville. He located here about the year 1855, and remained some two years.
     May & Wood came after Cadman. They remained in the photograph business here about two years.
     Since then there have been, in this line, the following: James Halsted, Mrs. Rinaker, De Lee, who was the first to make card photos, J. C. Strong, and R. C. Gledhill.
     The only photograph gallery in the city is conducted by R. C. Gledhill. He established the business in 1866, and has continued it ever since. His gallery is located over the store of Trepp & Schmieder.
     Robert C. Gledhill was born in the city of Philadelphia, April 1, 1839. At the age of four months his parents, Joseph and Emeline (Christy) Gledhill, took up the march to the setting sun and settled in Jacksonville, Ill. His father here embarked in merchandising, but afterwards relinquished it for agriculture. In 1849 Jos. Gledhill died, leaving his seven children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the third. After receiving as good an education as was obtainable in the common schools of those early days, he chose the profession of photography as his avocation in life. The first call for troops in 1861, by the lamented Lincoln, met with a ready response from him, and at the age of 21 years he enlisted in Co. A., 10th Ill. Inf., under Col. Jas. D. Morgan, of Quincy. He served three years and received merited promotions in the service. At the close of the war, he resumed his profession, moving to Jerseyville in 1866. He was married Feb. 18, 1868 to Mrs. Cora Strong, nee Dutcher, who was the mother of one son, Charles H. Strong, who is now 20 years of age, a graduate of the Jerseyville High School, and the Jones’ Commercial College, St. Louis. By their union there were two sons: Harry R. and Herbert, the former of whom is living, and who is 16 years of age. Herbert died at the age of three and a half years. Mr. Gledhill has been eminently successful in his business aspirations, has acquired the confidence of the community, and is a prominent member of the republican party in his county. He is a member of the First Baptist church at Jerseyville, and also a member of the I.O.O.F.

Hotels

     The building which yet retains the name of National Hotel, though it has ceased to be one except that rooms are let therein, is the oldest hotel building now standing in Jerseyville. Many happenings of interest in the early days of the city had their scene within its walls, and more than one political measure had its origin in schemes concocted in its chambers. Leading politicians, lawyers, churchmen, and other notables made this house their stopping place when business called them hither, for the National was known as one of the most pleasant of hostelries in the days agone.
     Before its erection, the need of adequate accommodations for the traveling public had long been felt. The matter was thoroughly discussed, and finally a stock company was organized with shares of $100 each, for the erection of a hotel building. E. M. Daley was the leader in the movement of forming the company. Work was commenced in the spring of 1838, and the building proceeded until the frame work was done, and the house enclosed. At this point there came a lull. Doubts had all along existed in the minds of some of the investors as to the probability of the house becoming a paying institution when finished. When the construction of the edifice had reached the point mentioned, negotiations were had with John Frost, which culminated in the purchase of the property, as it then stood, by that gentleman. He finished the building, furnished it throughout, and opened it to the public with some display. He presided over it in the capacity of host until 1846, when he sold out. E. M. Daley, who then became proprietor, leased the house to a man named Blackburn, who was its landlord for about two years. C. B. Fisher was the next to preside over the destinies of the National. It is impossible to give the succession of landlords of this historic structure, and the time each had possession, as it has passed from the memory of the old settlers, but from inquiry it is learned that Wm. Hawley, John Goff and James M. Young were also keepers of the inn. At present the National is owned by Bowman and Chapman, and is leased by A. C. Peckham, Jr.
     The Jersey House was built about 1835 by Stephen Herron, a blacksmith. It was at that time much smaller, and was used as a private residence, although they kept some boarders. After a time he opened it for the accommodation of the traveling public. After operating it for four years, he gave it up, and it became the property of the owners of the town site, Lott & Daley. Since that time it has been considerably enlarged, until now is a good sized house. Numerous have been the changes in the landlords who have presided over it, among whom were Harris Blanden, Dr. Dyke, __ Parker, and Henry C. Massey, the present owner. It has been used as a hotel or boarding house, until the summer of 1885, but is now used as a private residence.
     The Commercial Hotel was erected during the summer of 1874 by Wallace Leigh and Alfred Brinton, at a cost of $15,000. The building is still owned by its original proprietors, but the hotel business is conducted by Wallace Leigh & Son.
     W. H. Powell, the present landlord of the Erie House, took charge of it on Sept. 1, 1882.

Carriage Factory

     The carriage factory of George Egelhoff was established by that gentleman in 1860 in a building one block south of its present location. At that time the building was a small frame 30 x 40 feet in size, and is now used as a lumber ware room. Mr. Egelhoff carried on business here about eight years, when he purchased the present site of his manufactory, and erected the brick building on the corner, now used as office and store room. This structure is 40 x 50 feet in size, two stories high. In 1870 business had increased to such an extent that he was compelled to have more room, and an addition 40 x 75 feet in size was therefore built. In 1874 another addition 40 x 75 feet in dimension was added. Both of these were of brick and two stories high. He also, the same year, bought additional property in the same block, and thereon erected frame sheds for coal, lumber, etc. He had, in 1868, erected the present frame warehouse 25 x 40 feet in size, and two stories high, immediately south of the present brick structure, and used it for the storage of agricultural implements, the business of selling which he established at that time, and which is now operated by Egelhoff Bros. In 1881 a frame addition 25 x 75 feet in size, two stories high, with a sheet-iron roof, was erected, which is used for the storage of finished work. A 10-horse power engine furnishes the motive power for the machinery. Besides the buildings mentioned, there is a carriage repository across the street, which is 40 x 85 feet in size, frame. The entire business calls into requisition a capital of $35,000. Buggies, carriages, spring and farm wagons are all manufactured.
     Oliver A. Tiff, general blacksmith, established business at his present stand on Main street in Jerseyville in 1856. He manufactures wagons, and does general repairing and horse-shoeing. Mr. Tiff was born in Jefferson county, N.Y. in 1832, a son of William and Anna (Gabrel) Tiff, both natives of New York. He spent his early life in his native state, where he learned his trade. In 1854 he came to Illinois, settling in Jersey county, which has since been his home. He was married in 1856 to Ann S. Horten, a native of Greene county, and by this union has one child, Olive G., now the wife of John H. Richards, of Jerseyville. Mr. Tiff is a member of the I.O.O.F. and a useful and much respected citizen.
     Peter Dolan, blacksmith, of Jerseyville, is a son of Michael and Ann (McCormick) Dolan, natives of Ireland. Peter was born in New York City in 1832. His father having died in the city, he, when quite young, returned with his mother and brother to Ireland, where he remained until 1851, when he came back to the land of his birth, landing at New Orleans. Mr. Dolan was married in that city in 1855, to Maria Gorman, a native of Ireland, and came north in 1863, locating at Jerseyville, Jersey county, Ill., where he now resides. His family consists of three children: Kate, wife of Richard Kiely, of Jerseyville; James and Mary, living with their parents. Mr. Dolan owns a shop, a residence, and three lots in this city. He has served several times as a member of the town board, and is a respectable citizen. Both he and his wife are members of the Catholic church. His mother, Mrs. Ann Dolan, died in 1878.

Jerseyville Agricultural Works

     The manufacture of agricultural implements was commenced in Jerseyville in 1863 by Robert Newton and H. O. Goodrich, in partnership, under the firm title of Goodrich & Newton. They had in view the supplying, with Jerseyville productions, the wants of a large scope of country surrounding the city, in the way of farming machinery. They purchased a frame building 24 x 36 feet in ground area, and two stories high, located on the north side of Prairie street, which they converted into a shop. In 1865 Mr. Newton became sole proprietor of the works, and on assuming exclusive control, he erecte, on the opposite side of the street, a three story frame building, 40 feet wide by 60 in depth. This edifice was used as a warehouse, paint shop, etc., and for the setting up of machinery. Another building, 36 x 40 feet was put up, to be used for the display and sale of machines. In 1866, by the advent of Levi D. Cory into the business, the firm became Newton & Cory. The trade increased, and soon 20 men were employed in the establishment. In 1869 Mr. Newton became sole proprietor, and so continued until Nov. 1882, at which time a stock company was organized an incorporated for the purpose of carrying on the business. This association took the name of the Jerseyville Manufacturing Co., and started with a capital stock of $50,000. There were 17 stockholders, as follows: Robert Newton, H. C. Massey, Col. W. H. Fulkerson, Ormond Hamilton, Bowman & Ware, Morris R. Locke, Joseph M. Page, John A. Shephard, Wallace Leigh, Levi D. Holliday, O. A. Snedeker, C. W. Enos, Elias Cockrell, A. K. Van Horne, J. S. Daniels and F. S. Vandervort. Col. W. H. Fulkerson was chosen pres.; H. C. Massey, V.P.; J. M. Page, sec.; Stephen H. Bowman, treas.; and Robert Newton, general manager. In April 1885 Mr. Newton leased the works from the company, and he is now carrying on the business. He manufactures the Davenport “New Model” sulky plow, and deals also in all kinds of agricultural machinery. The plow mentioned has no superior, and is the leading implement of the kind, manufactured by the J. I. Case works at Racine, Wis. Mr. Davenport, the inventor, is a resident of Jerseyville, and this fine machine is but one of his many valuable inventions. The business transacted by this institution ranges between $30,000 and $45,000 annually.
     Robert Newton is a native of Manchester, Eng., born May 25, 1836. In 1840 his parents, Thomas and Anna Newton, emigrated to the United States, and soon after their arrival settled in New Hampshire. They afterward moved to Providence, R. I., where Robert served an apprenticeship to learn the trade of machinist and engineer. He remained in Providence until 1857, then came west and stopped first in St. Louis, but soon after came to Jerseyville. Here he entered the employ of George Horton, who was engaged in the manufacture of farm machinery. Mr. Newton had charge of this business until 1863, at which time he, in partnership with H. O. Goodrich, established his present business. He was married in Dec. 1865 to Sarah Cory, daughter of Joel Cory. They are the parents of four children: Albert, Mamie, Florence, and Cornelia. Mr. Newton takes an active interest in politics, casting his vote with the democratic party. He is a public spirited citizen, and has lent a helping hand to many enterprises, both public and private, for the benefit of the church, society and the public generally. He is a member of the Baptist church, and a Royal Arch Mason. He was one of the original stockholders of the Jersey County Agricultural and Mechanical Association. Mr. Newton is a man governed in all of his actions by a high moral principle, and always endeavors to do what he considers to be right under all circumstances, and as a citizen is much respected and esteemed.

Elevators

     The Jerseyville Elevator Co. began business in Dec. 1876. It was regularly incorporated, with a capital stock of $25,000. Officers were elected for the first term as follows: Hugh N. Cross, pres.; James A. Locke, vice-pres.; Walter E. Carlin, sec.; A. W. Cross, treas.; L. P. Squier, supt. The main building of this elevator is 66 feet in height, and has a ground area of 30 x 60 feet. It is equipped with 31 bins, and has a storage capacity of 40,000 bushels. The first year it did business, 200,000 bushels of grain were handled by this company. In 1878 W. E. Carlin purchased the interest of Mr. Locke, and the following year that of A. W. Cross, thus owning three-fourths of it. In the spring of 1881 they sold it to E. O. Stannard, of St. Louis, who still operates it.
     The elevator now owned by Massey & Carlin was built in 1865 by C. T. Edee, who ran it for some two or three years, when it was purchased by the present proprietors. It is 25 x 40 feet in ground area, and cost when built about $5,000.
     William H. Coulthard was born in Ohio in 1842. He is a son of John and Susan (Hardesty) Coulthard. The latter died when he was an infant, and his father subsequently re-married. When William was two years old he moved with his parents to Kentucky, and there lived until the close of the war in 1865. During the war he served 14 months in the 14th Ky. Cav., and was several times taken prisoner by guerrilla bands. In 1865 he returned to Ohio, where for four years he followed the occupation of farming. He then moved to Illinois and located in Greene county, where he resided until 1874. At that date he came to Jerseyville and took charge of an elevator, in which he has since continued in this city with the exception of one year, during which he was in the same business in East St. Louis. He was married in 1864 to Elizabeth M. Terry, a native of Kentucky. They have three children, Ida L., Eva A., and Halun P. Mrs. Coulthard is a member of the Baptist church. Mr. Coulthard is a member of the G.A.R. His father, John Coulthard died in 1869.
     The elevator firm of E. O. Stannard & Co. is composed of E. O. Stannard and E. P. Bronson, both residents of St. Louis. The elevator building is owned by Mr. Stannard, and he has the controlling interest in the business, Mr. Bronson having a one-fifth interest. J. H. Duffield has the management of their affairs here.
     What is known as the Cockrell elevator is now owned by J. M. Valentine, of Rockbridge, Greene county, and was purchased by him in May 1884 of E. Cockrell, who had operated it since 1871. The building was erected by Geo. C. Cockrell in 1867, at a cost of about $7,000. It was originally 25 x 40 feet on the ground, but an addition of the same size has since been added. George Cockrell ran it until 1869 alone, but in that year admitted E. Cockrell as partner, and they operated there until 1871, when George disposed of his interest to his partner. Previous to the erection of this building another elevator had been built in 1865 by George C. Cockrell and Charles Stiner, but which was subsequently destroyed by fire.

Mills

     The first mill at Jerseyville was a wind-mill constructed below town, but now within the city limits. It was built by James Garesche about the year 1839. It was operated mostly by Henry Schaff.
     The old Dodson mill, which has lately ceased operations, was built about 1851 by a man named Young. The next proprietor was named Roberts. He was succeeded by Turner & Whiteneck. This firm continued for awhile and then changed to Turner & VanPelt. After their retirement from the business, they leased the property to Remer & Paris. They ran it until the owners sold it to N. L. Adams. He operated the mill until 1873, when Theodore Dodson purchased it. W. D. Curtis was afterward admitted to the firm, and still remains therein in the new mill. The old building is 36 x 50 feet in dimensions and two and one-half stories in height. When Dodson bought the property he completely remodeled it. Its capacity was 125 barrels per day.
     In 1873 the Dodson brothers, Theodore and Frank M., came to Jerseyville to engage in the milling business. Theodore then purchased the N. L. Adams mill, and with himself as general manager, and Frank M. in charge of the business department, the mill and its products soon obtained a wide celebrity for the excellence of the manufactured product, and the uniform standard maintained. But, although the mill was generally considered a good one, and had received extensive additions and alterations in its equipment, it became unsatisfactor to the management, who took under consideration the project of erecting a new one in its stead, which should be a model in every respect. In the meantime, Theodore Dodson had associated with him in the business Mr. W. D. Curtis, a well-known citizen of Jersey county. The firm selected for their new mill a location near the junction of the Wabash and Chicago & Alton railroads, and in close proximity to four streets. Excavations were made, and the construction of the building was commenced early in 1884.
     Theodore Dodson was born in Jersey county, July 6, 1847, son of Aaron and Margaret (Biggers) Dodson. He resided with his parents on a farm until 16 years of age. In 1864 he enlisted in Co. C., 61st Ill. Inf., and served until the end of the war. After the war he worked at milling for Henry E. Dougherty, of Otterville, by whom he was employed about seven years. In 1873 he came to Jerseyville and purchased his present business. In 1884 he, in partnership with Mr. Curtis, erected the largest and best mill in Jersey county. Mr. Dodson was married on June 7, 1871 to Emma M. Noble, daughter of William and Thirza Noble. Mr. and Mrs. Dodson are the parents of four children, two of whom are living: Clarence and Theo. Mr. and Mrs. Dodson are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. He is an experience miller, having been in the business for 19 years. He is the general manager of the firm, and as a business man is shrewd, energetic and enterprising.
     Francis M. Dodson is a son of Aaron and Margaret (Biggers) Dodson, who came to Jersey county at an early date and settled in English township. Aaron Dodson is a native of Missouri and a minister of the gospel. He is now located at Otterville, in this county. His wife was born in Kentucky. The subject of this sketch was born in Jersey county, Nov. 14, 1842, and here reared on a farm, remaining with his parents until he was 18 years old. In November 1861 he enlisted in Co. C, 61st Ill. Inf. and served until the close of the war, participating in the battle of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, and other engagements. At the close of the war he returned to this county and located at Otterville, where he worked on a farm about two years. In 1869 he began learning the mason’s trade, and followed the same a few years. He came to Jerseyville in 1873 and was employed by his brother, Theodore Dodson, who purchased the flouring mill of N. L. Adams, and has since that date been engaged in the milling business. Mr. Dodson was married Nov. 30, 1873 to Hattie Hughes, daughter of Ephraim and Lucinda Hughes. They have two children, Nettie and Nellie (twins). Mr. and Mrs. Dodson are members of the Baptist church.
     The grist mill south of the C. & A. R. R. depot was built in 1866 by David R. Ross at a cost of about $16,000. He operated it for about a year, when he sold it to L. D. Cory, who with various partners carried on the business until 1873, when the present proprietor, Charles Jacobs, purchased it.

Brick Yard

     The brick yard east of the fair grounds was established and commenced operations in 1881. The business was commenced by Henry Bayer, Charles Rutter and William Gambel. The establishment gives employment to about eight workmen, the brick all hand-pressed.

Nurseries

     The Vandenburg nursery is located in the northwestern part of Jerseyville on the Fieldon road. The business was established in 1881 by Peter E. Vandenburg, the present proprietor. His establishment comprises 40 acres of land, and within its borders may be found every variety of fruit, shade or ornamental tree of use in this latitude, as well as all varieties of shrubs, flowers and all plants of all descriptions, usually found in an establishment of this kind. He puts out each year about 5,000 trees, and finds profitable employment for four traveling salesmen, who represent the nursery in Jersey, Greene, Macoupin, Madison and other counties. Mr. Vandenburg makes a specialty of small fruits, and his business in this line is represented by good figures.
     Peter E. Vandenburg, the nursery man, was born in Green county, N.Y. in 1843. He is a son of Henry L. and Helen A. (Van Schaack) Vanderburg, both natives of the state of New York. Henry L. Vandenburg now lives in Jerseyville, but his wife died in 1873. Peter, during the war, enlisted in the 189th N.Y. Inf., and served nine months as a member of Co. F. He participated in the Petersburg campaign, and was in 14 battles and skirmishes. March 17, 1868 he was married to Josephine Lyon, a native of New York, who died in 1873, leaving three children: Ralph L. and Grace J. living at home; and Minnie C., in New York. Mr. Vandenburg was again married Feb. 17, 1876 to Ella J. Williams, a native of Connecticut. They have one child, Anna W. Mr. and Mrs. Vandenburg are members of the Presbyterian church. He belongs to the Knights of Honor.
     The nursery business of Fenity & Merida was established in 1878 by F. C. Fenity. No change has occurred in the proprietorship since then, save the addition of S. J. Merida to the firm. Mr. Fenity manages the Jerseyville business.

Postoffice

     The postoffice of Jerseyville was established about the year 1834, with Edward M. Daley as first postmaster. He was succeeded in 1840 by David T. Bunnell, who held the position until 1844, when he gave way to Perley Silloway. Charles H. Roberts was the next incumbent, and was followed by Alex. B. Morean. In 1853 Charles H. Jackson was appointed and served until 1858, when he was succeeded by Jacob E. Whiteneck. The latter gentleman held the office until the appointment of Thomas L. McGill in 1861. Mr. McGill held the office but a short time, when his death occurred, and his wife succeeded him. John I. White was the next to occupy the position, but soon afterward resigned in favor of William Pitt, who held the office about two years. He was followed by Joseph H. Buffington, who held it two or three years. George H. Jackson then acted as special agent for a while, and was afterward appointed, serving until 1869, when Jacob E. Whiteneck was again appointed. He continued in office until 1877, when he was succeeded by J. L. C. Richards, who held the office until Feb. 1882, since which time the office has been conducted by the present incumbent, William H. Edgar.
     Col. W. H. Edgar, one of the leading representatives of that well known family, was born Sept. 10, 1840. He followed the fortunes of the family in his early years, and received excellent educational advantages. In his 21st year he graduated from that well known institution of learning, the Illinois College at Jacksonville, Ill. in June 1861. During the latter part of his school years, the embers of discord, which had so long been glowing in the south, broke forth in the flame of civil war. Then came the trial of patriotism. Our subject, though just out of school, was soon in the ranks as a private soldier in the 33rd Ill. Inf. Later on we find him a second lieutenant in the 32nd Ill. Inf. Both as a private and officer, he did his duty as a soldier. After leaving the service, he read law in Judge Park’s office at Aurora, Ill., and was admitted to the bar in 1863. He became connected with the Jerseyville Republican in 1869. His connection with this paper, and later with the Republican-Examiner, is noted in the Press chapter. In 1876 he was commissioned as colonel and aid-de-camp to Gov. Cullom. He has been for a number of years prominent in political matters, occupying a leading place in the councils of the republican party. In 1880 he contested the seat in congress from the 11th Ill. district, with Gen. Singleton, and although opposed by such a popular man, he not only received the entire the support of his party, but made large gains in the city of Quincy, the home of his opponent. He has been a member of the republican central committee of Jersey county since coming to reside here, and has been its chairman for the past four years. He has also been connected with the schools of the city as a member of the board of education. Col. Edgar received his appointment as postmaster of Jerseyville from President Arthur in 1882, and continued to hold that position in a satisfactory manner to the end of his term.
     Jacob E. Whiteneck was born in New Jersey Feb. 12, 1826. He was reared and educated in his native state, there learning the tailor’s trade. He was married in New Jersey, 1849, to Lindamiry C. Tharp, also a native of that state. In 1852 he came to Illinois and settled in Jerseyville. Here he at first engaged in the manufacture of buckskin gloves. Two years later he was elected constable, and served a number of years. In 1856 he was appointed postmaster, which office he held during Buchanan’s administration. He subsequently clerked in a store, and was engaged for a time in the grain business as clerk. In May 1869 he was again appointed postmaster and served until 1877, when he again engaged in clerking. When W. H. Edgar became postmaster, Mr. Whiteneck entered his employ as postoffice clerk, in which capacity his is at present serving. Mr. and Mrs. Whiteneck have had 11 children, eight of whom are now living: Maggie, now Mrs. Clarkson; Adaline; Hattie and Helen (twins); Mollie, Anna, Mathias and Henry. Two children died in infancy, and one at the age of 16. Mr. Whiteneck was formerly a democrat in politics, but during the late war joined the republican party, of which he has since been a supporter. He is a member of the Presbyterian church.

Societies

     At a meeting at the office of Dr. J. L. White, Sept. 19, 1863, D’Arcy lodge, U.D., A. F. & A. M., was organized with the following officers: J. L. White, W.M.; John N. Squier, S.W.; William B. Nevius, J.W. Others present at this meeting were: Milton Park, John E. Van Pelt, N. Smith, A. Calhoun, B. F. Calhoun, J. B. Schroeder, Andrew Jackson. Sept. 12, 1864, the name of the lodge was changed to Jerseyville lodge, and an application made for a charter, which was granted on Oct. 5, following. The petitioners of the charter were: N. L. Adams, Charles N. Adams, W. W. Bailey, Charles H. Bowman, James Bringhurst, Ed. Bohannan, A. Calhoun, B. F. Calhoun, C. C. Cummings, P. D. Cheney, M. V. Hamilton, Andrew Jackson, John L. Lofton, Thomas Marshal, W. B. Nevius, John H. Onetto, M. Park, N. L. Smith, J. N. Squier, J. B. Schneider, W. H. Schroeder, J. E. Van Pelt, John L. White, and several others residing at or near Jerseyville. The lodge was chartered as Jerseyville lodge No. 394, with J. L. White, W.M.; John N. Squier, S.W.; William B. Nevius, J.W. On Dec. 12, 1864 officers were elected as follows: John L. White, W.M.; John N. Squier, S.W.; J. B. Schroeder, J.W.; W. W. Bailey, treas.; Andrew Jackson, sec.; Edward Bohannan, S.D.; B. F. Calhoun, J.D. Officers elected in 1865: J. B. Schroeder, W.M.; John W. Vinson, S.W.; A. Calhoun, J.W.; W. W. Bailey, treas.; Andrew Jackson, sec. Officers elected in 1866: John L. White, W.M.; S. M. Titus, S.W.; George White, J.W.; Charles Miner, sec.; John M. Squier, treas. 1867: J. L. White, W.M.; J. M. Wadding, S.W.; R. M. Knapp, J.W.; S. M. Titus, treas.; Morris R. Locke, sec. 1868: J. L. White, W.M.; Charles Miner, S.W.; J. D. Russell, J. W.; M. D. Robbins, treas; Morris R. Locke, sec. 1870: Charles E. Miner, W.M.; James E. Daniels, S.W.; J. G. Marston, J.W.; M. D. Robbins, treas.; Morris R. Locke, sec. 1871: Charles E. Miner, W.M.; J. S. Daniels, S.W.; Joseph G. Marston, J.W.; M. D. Robbins, treas.; Morris R. Locke, sec. 1872: Charles E. Miner, W.M.; J. G. Marston, S.W.; N. F. Smith, J.W.; M. D. Robbins, treas.; Morris R. Locke, sec. 1873: Charles E. Miner, W.M.; David M. Haughtlin, S.W.; A. A. Goodrich, J.W.; J. G. Marston, treas.; Henry Nevius, sec. 1874: J. G. Marston, W.M.; A. A. Goodrich, S.W.; T. S. Chapman, J.W.; J. S. Daniels, treas.; Henry Nevius, sec. 1875: J. G. Marston, W.M.; Charles E. Miner, S.W.; David M. Haughtlin, J.W.; J. S. Daniels, treas.; Henry Nevius, sec. 1876: Charles E. Miner, W.M.; D. M. Haughtlin, S.W.; J. B. Rowray, J.W.; J. S. Daniels, treas.; F. M. Dodson, sec. 1877: Charles E. miner, W.M.; D. M. Haughtlin, S.W.; J. G. Marston, J.W.; J. S. Daniels, treas.; O. B. Hamilton, sec. 1878: Morris R. Locke, W.M.; B. M. Krumpanitzky, S.W.; J. K. Smith, J.W.; J. S. Daniels, treas.; J. S. Holmes, sec. 1879: O. B. Hamilton, W.M.; J. K. Smith, S.W.; J. S. Daniels, treas.; L. P. Squier, J.W.; W. H. Callender, sec. 1880: J. S. Daniels, W.M.; J. G. Marston, S.W.; Andrew Cope, J.W.; J. S. Holmes, sec; T. S. Chapman, treas. 1881: J. G. Marston, W.M.; Andrew Cope, S.W.; T. S. Chapmen, J.W.; J. S. Daniels, treas.; George S. Miles, sec. 1882: J. G. Marston, W.M.; Charles E. Miner, S.W.; George Sumrall, S.W.; T. S. Chapman, J.W.; J. S. Daniels, treas.; J. S. Holmes, sec. 1883: J. G. Marston, W.M.; George Sumrall, S.W.; T. S. Chapman, J.W.; J. S. Daniels, treas.; J. S. Holmes, sec. 1884: J. S. Daniels, W.M.; A. K. Van Horne, S.W.; R. S. Beatty, J.W.; J. S. Holmes, sec.; S. H. Bowman, treas. In 1882 the lodge purchased the third story of the store building then owned by J. C. Barr and A. W. Cross at a consideration of $1,500. They then raised the roof and remodled the same at an additional expense of about $1,800, so that they now hae elegant apartments 24 x 100 feet in size, the main lodge room being 24 x 60 feet in dimensions. The chapter rents the use of the apartment of the Blue lodge. The lodge has a membership at present of about 75, and is in a very flourishing condition. The regular communications are on Monday evenings on or before the full moon in each month.
     Jerseyville chapter No. 140, Royal Arch Masons, was organized under dispensation, Feb. 4, 1870, by John M. Pierson, G.H.P. The charter was granted to the organization, Oct. 7, 1870, the charter members being: George L. Hassett, Robert M. Knapp, Andrew Jackson, Smith M. Titus, J. B. Schroeder, John N. Squier, Morris R. Locke, L. P. Squier, W. H. Hassett, M. D. Robbins, James S. Daniels, N. F. Smith, J. H. Belt, Charles E. Miner, James A. Locke, Stephen H. Bowman, Robert Newton and Hiram McClusky. The first officers were: George L. Hassett, M.E.H.P.; Robert M. Knapp, E.K.; Morris R. Locke, E.S. At the election held Dec. 12, 1870, the following officers were elected: Geo. L. Hassett, E.H.P.; M. D. Robbins, E.K.; J. B. Schroeder, E. S.; James Daniels, C. of H.; C. E. Miner, P.S.; Morris R. Locke, R.A.C.; J. G. Marston, G.M. 3rd V.; N. F. Smith, G. M. 2nd V.; J. K. Cadwallader, G.M. 1st V.; J. A. Locke, treas.; S. H. Bowman, sec.; L. P. Squier, sent. 1871: Morris R. Locke, M.E.H.P.; George L. Hassett, E.K.; S. H. Bowman, E.S.; M. D. Robbins, sec.; Jas. A. Locke, treas.; J. S. Daniels, C. of H.; C. E. Miner, P.S.; J. G. Marston, R.A.C.; Al. Brinton, G.M. of 3rd V.; N. T. Smith, G.M. of 2nd V.; D. M. Houghtlin, G.M. of 1st V.; L. C. Irvin, sent. 1872: Chas. E. Miner, M.E.H.P.; Morris R. Locke, E.K.; J. W. Phillips, E.S.; J. S. Daniels, C. of H.; J. G. Marston, P.S.; D. M. Houghtlin, R.A.C.; B. F. Calhoun, G.M. of 3rd V.; L. Y. McAdams, G.M. of 2nd V.; S. B. Clapp, G.M. of 1st V.; S. H. Bowman, sec.; J. A. Locke, treas.; L. H. Halliday, sent. 1873: Morris R. Locke, M.E.H.P.; Robert Newton, E.K.; Jarrett Grimes, E.S.; J. S. Daniels, C. of H.; D. M. Houghtlin, P.S.; J. G. Marston, R.A.C.; A. Brinton, G.M. of 3rd V.; B. F. Calhoun, G. M. of 2nd V.; C. E. Miner, G.M. of 1st V.; J. A. Locke, treas.; L. P. Squier, sec.; R. M. Knapp, sent. 1874: Morris R. Locke, M.E.H.P.; Edward Colean, E.K.; Robert Newton, E.S.; J. S. Daniels, C. of H.; C. E. Miner, P.S.; J. G. Marston, R.A.C.; J. G. Irwin, G.M. of 3rd V.; D. M. Houghtlin, G.M. of 2nd V.; B. F. Calhoun, G.M. of 1st V.; Theodore S. Chapman, sec.; S. H. Bowman, treas.; J. A. Locke, sent. 1875: Morris R. Locke, M.E.H.P.; L. P. Squier, E.K.; H. N. Belt, E.S.; J. S. Daniels, C. of H.; C. E. Miner, P.S.; J. G. Marston, R.A.C.; D. M. Houghtlin, G.M. of 3rd V.; B. F. Calhoun, G.M. of 2nd V.; L. Y. McAdams, G.M. of 1st V.; J. A. Locke, sec.; S. H. Bowman, treas.; James Eads, sent. 1876: Morris R. Locke, M.E.H.P.; L. P. Squier, E.K.; H. N. Belt, E.S.; J. S. Daniels, C. of H.; C. E. Miner, P.S.; J. G. Marston, R.A.C.; D. M. Houghtlin, G.M. 3rd V.; O. B. Hamilton, G.M. 2nd V.; S. Bothwell, G.M. 1st V.; J. A. Locke, sec.; S. H. Bowman, treas.; N. F. Smith, sent. 1877: Morris R. Locke, M.E.H.P.; L. P. Squier, E.K.; A. K. Van Horne, E.S.; J. A. Locke, sec.; S. H. Bowman, treas.; J. S. Daniels, C. of H.; C. E. Miner, P.S.; O. B. Hamilton, R.A.C.; J. G. Marston, G.M. 3rd V.; D. M. Haughtlin, G. M. 2nd V.; J. W. Clark, G.M. 1st V.; B. F. Calhoun, sent. 1878: C. E. Miner, M.E.H.P.; L. P. Squier, E.K.; R. Newton, E.S.; J. G. Marston, C. of H.; J. S. Daniels, P.S.; O. B. Hamilton, R.A.C.; A. K. Van Horne, G.M. 3rd V.; M. R. Locke, G.M. 2nd V.; B. F. Calhoun, G.M. 1st V.; J. A. Locke, sec.; S. H. Bowman, treas.; Horace M. Lobb, sent. 1879: C. E. Miner, M.E.H.P.; L. P. Squier, E.K.; J. T. Grimes, E.S.; J. G. Marston, C. of H.; J. S. Daniels, P.S.; O. B. Hamilton, R.A.C.; A. K. Van Horne, G.M. 3rd V.; Morris R. Locke, G.M. 2nd V.; T. S. Chapman, G.M. 1st V.; J. A. Locke, sec.; S. H. Bowman, treas.; Robert Newton, sent. For 1880 there was no election, and the old officers held over for the next year. 1881: C. E. Miner, M.E.H.P.; A. M. Slaten, E.K.; J. K. Cadwallader, E.S.; J. G. Marston, C. of H.; J. S. Daniels, P.S.; D. M. Houghtlin, R.A.C.; L. Y. McAdams, G.M. 3rd V.; A. K. VanHorne, G.M. 2nd V.; H. C. Terry, G.M. 1st V.; Edward Colean, treas.; Morris R. Locke, sec.; Erasmus Fries, sent. 1882: C. E. Miner, M.E.H.P.; George Sumrall, E.K.; L. P. Squier, E.S.; J. G. Marston, C. of H.; J. S. Daniels, P.S.; D. M. Houghtlin, R.A.C.; S. H. Bowman, treas.; Morris R. Locke, sec.; A. K. VanHorne, G.M. 3rd V.; E. Fries, G.M. 2nd V.; T. S. Chapman, G.M. 1st V.; L. Y. McAdams, sent. 1883: T. S. Chapman, M.E.H.P.; George Sumrall, E.K.; J. Pike, E.S.; J. G. Marston, C. of H.; A. K. VanHorne, P.S.; J. K. Cadwallader, R.A.C.; W. Eads, G.M. 3rd V.; Amos Stroud, G.M. 2nd V.; George C. Cockrell, G.M. 1st V.; Morris R. Locke, sec.; J. S. Daniels, treas.; James Eads, sent. 1884: J. G. Marston, M.E.H.P.; Edward Colean, E.K.; E. Fries, E.S.; C. E. Miner, C. of H.; A. K. VanHorne, P.S.; D. Houghtlin, R.A.C.; T. S. Chapman, G.M. 3rd V.; A. P. Stroud, G.M. 2nd V.; George Sumrall, G.M. 1st V.; J. S. Daniels, treas.; Morris R. Locke, sec.; William Eads, sent. The finance committe for 1885 is composed of J. G. Marston, Edward Colean and Erasmus Fries. Regular convocations are held on the first Monday after the full moon of each month.
     Lowe Post No. 295, G.A.R., held its first charter meeting July 6, 1883, and the following charter members wre mustered in by Commander John G. Mack, of Springfield: H. C. Bull, J. H. Duffield, A. J. Osborn, John Powell, W. H. Coulthard, C. F. Cruser, S. P. Clendenned, G. H. Sturtevant, John E. Boynton, Charles Doerge, William La Rue, John H. Price, G. C. Cockrell, J. S. Malotte, E. L. H. Barry, Stephen Catt, John Fraser and William F. Gambel. Officers were elected at the first meeting as follows: J. H. Duffield, P.C.; A. J. Osborn, S.V.C.; Chas. Doerge, J.V.C.; J. S. Malotte, Adjt.; W. H. Coulthard, Q.M.; E. L. H. Barry, surgeon; Rev. Stephen Catt, chaplain; John Powell, O.D.; H. C. Bull, O.G.; N. C. Beaty, S.M.; G. H. Sturtevant, Q.S. At the election held in Jan. 1884 the following offcers were chosen: J. M. Page, P.C.; A. J. Osborn, S.V.C.; Chas. Doerge, J.V.C.; J. S. Malotte, Adjt.; A. J. Everts, Chap.; W. H. Coulthard, Q.M.; E. L. H. Barry, Surg.; G. H. Sturtevant, Q.S.; S. P. Clendennen, O.G.; J. H. Duffield, O.D. For 1885 the officers are as follows: A. J. Osborn, P.C.; Chas. Doerge, S.V.C.; J. H. Sturtevant, J.V.C.; J. S. Malotte, Adjt.; Wm. La Rue, Q.M.; J. M. Page, O.D.; Edward Slatetrly, O.B.; E. L. H. Barry, Surg.; D. C. Witze, Chap.; Henry Doenges, Q.M.; Wm Coulthard, S.M. The post is in good condition and has a membership of about 55 on its rolls. Meetings are held on the evenings of the second and fourth Tuesday in each month in Sons of Temperance hall.
     Jerseyville lodge No. 53, I.O.O.F., was instituted May 3, 1849, at the court house in Jerseyville by District Deputy Grand Master Raynor of Collinsbille, assisted by T. P. Ash, N.G., and six other officers and members of Alton lodge No. 2. The five charter members were: Peyton C. Walker, A. C. Hutchison, Dr. James Bringhurst, deceased, and Samuel Cohen and C. H. Roberts. The members initiated on that evening were: William Yates, Dr. J. C. Perry, N. L. Adams, A. P. Staats, R. L. Hill (all now deceased), P. Silloway, Geo. E. Warren, C. F. Burke and Jon. Plowman. The first officers were: Wm. Yates, N.G.; R. L. Hill, V.G.; C. H. Roberts, Sec.; Jon. Plowman, Treas. The first hall used by the lodge was erected by it in 1851 by stock subscription of the members. The present membership is 65, total number of names on the roll 352, past grands 72, died 50. The officers for the ensuing year are: J. H. Richards, N.G.; C. H. Blish, V.G.; Geo. M. Cockrell, Sec.; Benj. Barnett, P.S.; C. S. Daniels, Treas.; H. W. Fisher, acting P.G. Meetings are held at the hall of the lodge every Thursday evening. The annual revenue is $630.
     Jerseyville Encampment No. 20, I.O.O.F., was instituted July 6, 1852 by Grand Patriarch James E. Starr, assisted by J. P. Beaumont, H.P.; Wm. Shattuck, S.W.; A. S. Barry, J.W.; B. F. Barry, scribe, with the following charter members; Rev. L. P. Grosvenor, P. C. Walker, Wright Casey, Edwin A. Casey, A. L. Knapp, N. L. Adams, all now deceased, and C. H. Roberts. The first officers elected were: L. P. Grosvenor, C.P.; E. A. Casey, H.P.; N. L. Adams, S.W.; C. H. Roberts, scribe; Wright Casey, treas. At the same meeting the following members wre elected and initiated: William Yates, A. M. Blackburn, both now deceased, Geo. E. Warren, B. B. Hamilton and H. O. Goodrich. The present membership is 69, 109 names appear on the roll. Of the present members of the encampment, Patriarch Walter E. Carlin has been grand worthy patriarch of the grand encampment of Illinois and is representative for the third time to the sovereign grand lodge of the United States, and Patriarch J. S. Carr is the present deputy grand master of the grand lodge of Illinois.
     Antioch lodge No. 65, Knights of Pythias, is one of the leading secret organizations of Jerseyville. A meeting for the formation of such a lodge was held Feb. 7, 1876. An organization was effected, under auspicious circumstances, with the following charter members: Geo. W. Herdman, Geo. C. Cockrell, H. D. Stelle, Elias Cockrell, W. S. Bowman, J. P. Holcomb, William L. Scott, Henry Nevius, R. B. Leak, Barclay Wedding, G. M. Eaton, A. H. Barrett, C. E. Casey, Henry T. Nail, John Wiley, S. J. Snedeker, J. H. Bothwell, J. I. McGready, H. D. Field, and W. H. Edgar. The first officers elected were: G. W. Herdman, C.C.; H. T. Nail, B.C.; G. M. Eaton, M.E.; G. C. Cockrell, M.F.; H. D. Stelle, K.R.&S.; A. H. Barrett, M.A.; H. Nevius, I.G.; John Wiley, O.G.; W. M. Jackson, P.C.; W. S. Bowman, P. Their hall is in the postoffice building, owned by R. C. Gledhill. The number of members in good standing at the present time is 43. The officers for the ensuing term are: J. W. McEvers, P.C.; E. A. R. Myers, C.C.; J. L. Jarboe, V.C.; Elias Cockrell, M.E.; J. R. Colean, M.R.; C. S. Blish, K.R.&S.; E. L. H. Barry, Jr., M.A.; E. L. H. Barry, Sr., I.G.; Fred Armstrong, O.G.
     Apollo lodge No. 877, K. of H., was organized Feb. 11, 1878 by D. G. D., John B. Booker, of the grand lodge K. of H. of Illinois with 20 charter members: James Eads, John W. Vinson, Caleb Du Hadway, Joseph Malotte, Clarence M. Hamilton, Oscar B. Hamilton, Ludlow P. Squiers, Augustus K. Van Horne, George F. Walker, Joseph M. Page, Frank W. Smith, Richard G. Fain, George E. Warren, Jr., Ellis E. Whitehead, James S. Daniels, Joshua Pike, Charles E. Miner, Milton E. Ellingwood, John C. Darby, and William F. Krotzsch. The first officers were: John W. Vinson, P.D.; Charles E. Miner, d.; James S. Daniels, V.D.; Ludlow P. Squires, A.D.; Oscar B. Hamilton, R.; Joseph M. Page, F.R.; John C. Darby, treas.; Richard G. Fain, chap.; Joseph Malotte, G.E.; Geo. E. Warren, G.N.; T. W. Smith, S.; Clarence M. Hamilton, James Eads and Caleb Du Hadway, trustees. The present officers are: John C. Gaskill, P.D.; Henry F. Bayer, D.; Frank W. Roerig, V.D.; Henry A. McClintock, A.D.; Lewis R. Meyers, R.; Clarence M. Hamilton, F.R.; Joel E. Cory, treas.; William H. Parker, chap.; Casper Sabo, G.; John Mode, S.; James S. Daniels, John W. Vinson and Joshua Pike, trustees. The present membership is 68, and the lodge is in good condition at present. The membership is composed of some of the most prominent citizens of Jerseyville, and the county of Jersey.
     Jerseyville Division No. 16, Sons of Temperance, was the first lodge of a secret order, not only in the city of Jerseyville, but in Jersey county as well. It was first organized August 4, 1847 with the following officers: B. C. Woods, W.P.; A. B. Morean, W.A.; Wm. B. Nevins, R.S.; Thomas L. McGill, A.R.S.; W. J. West, F.S.; Chas. H. Knapp, Treas.; Amos Brown, chap.; Peyton C. Walker, Cond.; A. P. Staats, A.C.; George Wharton, I.S.; Francis Osborn, O.S.; Elihu J. Palmer, P.W.P. The interest gradually died out, and finally meetings were no longer held, and the division was disbanded. This division was reorganized February 11, 1878 by Grand Worthy Patriarch Rev. J. Nate, of the grand division of Sons of Temperance of Illinois. The charter members were: Henry Gill, Lewis R. Myers, Wm. F. Gammel, Johnson Norris, Daniel McFain, George Morley, Eli D. Walker, Henry Delicate, Wm. H. Pogue, Benjamin C. Clayton, Daniel W. Phillips, Oscar B. Hamilston, Stephen Catt, James A. Barr, James C. Ross, George W. West, Francis Osborn, Lewis R. Phelps, Francis R. Dutton, Norman E. Landon, Charles W. Enos, N. H. Landon, and Wm. McBride. The officers elected to serve the first term were: Daniel McFain, P.W.P.; James A. Barr, W.P.; Benjamin Clayton, W.A.; Oscar B. Hamilton, R.S.; Chas. W. Enos, A.R.S.; Wm. H. Callender, F.S.; Alfred Price, treas.; Henry Delicate, chap.; Wm. McBride, cond.; Johnson Norris, O.S. The division organized with 30 members and advanced to 200. At present the membership is 67. The officers are: Ella Daniels, W.P.; J. H. Duffield, W.A.; Frank W. Embley, P.W.P.; Lewis R. Myers, R.S., Lawrence Enos, A.R.S.; A. J. Osborn, F.S.; Mrs. James A. Barr, treas.; Mrs. J. E. Boynton, chap; Keller Maxwell, cond.; Jennie Davis, A.C.; Emma Daniels, I.S.; Norman Landon, O.S.
     Jerseyville Lodge No. 87, Independent Order of Mutual Aid, was instituted and charter granted July 20, 1880. The charter members were: R. P. Shackelford, William Ford, Peter Dolan, Thos. A. Davis, William E. Hibble, H. Z. Gill, Phillip Block, John Mode, Henry Heller, Frederick Hartzen, David M. Zeller, Christian Harms, Joseph W. VanCleve, John W. Vinson, John M. Waller, Charles A. Edgar, Conrad Borger, Frederick Hund, Frederick Nagel, C. F. Hawkins, Geo. W. Wolfe, and G. W. Sheffer. The first officers were: R. P. Shackelford, P.P.; Wm. Ford, Pres.; Peter Dolan, V.P.; T. O. Davis, R.S.; W. E. Hibble, F.S.; H. Z. Gill, treas.; J. W. Van Cleve, chaplain; John Mode, I.G.; Christian Harms, O.G.; Fred Hartzen, conductor; D. W. Zeller, Henry Heller and Phillip Block, trustees. There is now a membership of 16, all in good standing; they have no debts, the state order has paid off its indebtedness, and a season of prosperity now opens before the local lodge. There have been no deaths in their ranks since organization. The officers for the year 1885 are: Henry Heller, P.; Geo. H. Wolfe, V.P.; John C. Gaskill, R.S.; Robert Schmidt, F.S.; Phillip Block, treas.; Christian Harms, conductor; Conrad Borger, I.G.; Frederick Zimmerli, O.G.; John W. Vinson, Geo. H. Wolfe and Henry Heller, trustees. Meetings are held on the first and third Monday in each month in the hall over Hamilton’s store. The lodge has been represented at the grand lodge meetings once each by H. C. Gill and T. A. Davis, and twice by Phillip Block. The latter is also representative to the next grand lodge, which meets in Springfield in Feb. 1886.

Municipal

     The town of Jerseyville was first incorporated as such on July 21, 1837. The first officers were: John W. Lott, president of the board of trustees; E. M. Daley, clerk; Samuel L. McGill, George W. Collins and Richard Graham, board of trustees.
     It was incorporated as a city Feb. 21, 1867, at which time the following were elected the first officers under the new organization: Marcus E. Bayley, mayor; George H. Jackson, clerk; Jas. S. Daniels, marshal; King & Pinero, attorneys; N. Wallace, constable; and Andrew Jackson, John L. White, Geo. Egelhoff and James S. Blythe, aldermen.
     The following are the present officers: E. L. H. Barry, mayor; Will Hanley, clerk; Henry Whyte, marshal; Thomas F. Ferns, attorney; G. M. Eaton, A. K. Van Horne, John Fox, F. J. Bertman, Geo. Egelhoff, Henry Nevius, J. S. Daniels, and J. A. Shephard, aldermen.

Newspapers

     Jerseyville now has four newspapers. One of these is of daily issue, while the other three are weekly publications.

Cemetery

     The Jerseyville cemetery occupies a portion of the southeast quarter of the northeast quarter of section 21. It was surveyed and platted by Henry M. Chase, county surveyor, July 17, 1856. The plat was recorded July 19, signed by A. B. Morean, president, and A. M. Blackburn, clerk of the council of the town of Jerseyville. The premises are kept in neat order, walks are laid out through all portions of the grounds, and everything about presents such an appearance as is a source of pride to the people of the city.

Prominent Citizens.

     Isaac Snedeker, deceased, was among the prominent settlers of this county at an early date. He was born at Four Mile Ferry, near Trenton, New Jersey, November 22d, 1812, the youngest of four sons of Isaac and Catharine Snedeker. His youthful days were spent at home under the paternal roof, and when sufficiently grown aided in the work of the farm, and each year attended the neighboring schools a portion of the time, making fair progress in his studies until his 18th year, when a desire to do something for himself was developed by his leaving home and interesting himself in the public works, aiding in building the Trenton Water Works, and when these were finished engaging on the Delaware and Raritan Canal, and from this to the building of the Camden & Amboy Railroad, spending the earlier years of his manhood in the practical duties required of him. When these great works were completed he engaged in literary pursuits, and was employed in gathering the material and data for compiling the New Jersey Historical Gazetteer and Map of the State, spending several years in this work until it was completed, when he settled on a farm in Monroe county, N.Y. He was early known for his public spirit, giving aid to the building up of churches and educational institutions. He connected himself with the M.E. church, and with others established the Perrington church in his neighborhood and erected Perrington Chapel, which bore the impress of his architectural direction and was an ornament to the surrounding neighborhood, – a model for other church buildings to copy from. He was one of the stewards of that church until his removal from the state. He was active in the military organizations of New York, and was commissioned by Governor Marcy, August 1, 1836, as one of the official staff of the 52nd N.Y. Inf, Col. E. Sutherland commanding, with rank from June 18, 1836, holding the office until July 17, 1841, when he resigned and was honorably mustered out by Brigadier-General Lathrop. He resided in New York until the spring of 1844, when he came to Jerseyville, Ill., where, in connection with his brother Samuel, he engaged in farming, each taking charge of parts of the business that their peculiar genius best fitted them, and for years their farming investments were very successfully managed. He early identified himself with the reformatory and educational interests of his new location, and particularly in promoting the temperance work – becoming identified with the Sons of Temperance and one of its most active members. He was also opposed to the institution of slavery while in New York, and was president of an Anti-slavery society. He believed it a wrong, and opposed it with might and power, and at an early day was instrumental in organizing an anti-slavery society in this county, when it required nerve, firmness and pluck to dare to advocate their principles. He was frequently threatened, and even life endangered, because of his outspoken principles. In June 1846, he was married to Miss Caroline Sunderland, daughter to John Sunderland, of Trenton, New Jersey, and sister of his brother Samuel’s wife. The union was a happy one all through the years of his useful life. In Oct. 1849, Joseph Crabb, a justice of the peace, committed three young men, all nearly as white as himself, to the county jail, under the authority of the black laws of Illinois. Mr. Snedeker had them taken out on a writ of habeas corpus and taken before the circuit court, and they were discharged. It is claimed that this was the first time that the Black Laws, under the new constitution of 1848, had been tested, and the first time a negro had been released from a common jail by a writ of habeas corpus in Illinois. Mr. Snedeker’s first vote was cast for Henry Clay, and he voted twice for Abraham Lincoln, a warm personal friendship existing between them. At the opening and during the civil war of 1861, there was a strong disloyal element in this county, and it required pluck and courage to stand true to principle. Mr. Snedeker dared to come out boldly and advocate the cause of the Union, and in him the soldier boys had a firm friend. He was one of the chief promoters of the objects of the Illinois State Horticultural Society, a regular attendant on its sessions, and in connection with O. B. Galusha, Dr. E. S. Hull, Jonathan Huggins, A. Hilliand, W. H. Mann, Hon. A. M. Brown, D. B. Wier, Dr. A. G. Humphrey, H. G. Minkler, M. M. Hooton, Dr. J. Long, M. L. Dunlap, and Hon. John M. Pearson, was instrumental in promoting the cultivation of fruit in all parts of the state. He never failed to attend the annual meeting of the society and take an active part in their deliberations, impressing his practical knowledge and embodying it in their reports. His labors in this connection were not confined to this state, but he attended the Missouri State Horticultural Society’s Meetings and took part in its deliberations. He was eminently a social man. Blessed with abundance, he was never so happy as when dispensing hospitality to his friends. In his family relations be was most happy. Isaac Snedeker departed this life July 4th, 1877, at his home, after a sickness of nearly one year, terminating in cancer of the stomach. He contained within himself all the good qualities of head and heart that ennobles a man, and should be emulated. Of him it can truly be said ” Being dead, he yet speaketh,” for he will live in the remembrance of a large circle of friends for many years. Mrs. Caroline Snedeker resides with her son Orville in Jerseyville.
     Hon. Orville A. Snedeker, lawyer and real estate dealer, was born June 12, 1848 at Jerseyville. He was educated in the public schools of Jerseyville, and entered Shurtleff College, Upper Alton, and graduated after which he spent two years in Chicago in mercantile life and reading law, and graduated from Bryant & Stratton’s Business College; then he returned to Jerseyville and spent a year in the law office of Judge R. A. King, after which he was admitted to practice law in the supreme county, and has ever since been in practice here, being licensed to practice in all the courts. He also deals extensively in real estate, which business occupies much of his time. He was married in 1873 to Emma L. Dalzell, of Philadelphia. They are the parents of two children, Isaac and Samuel Frank.
     Sam’l J. Snedeker, the other son of Isaac Snedeker, was born in this county Aug. 7, 1851. He is the youngest of the children and was brought up on the farm, remaining with his parents until 21 years old. He then rented land in Jerseyville township, which he cultivated until 1877, when he purchased 80 acres on section 22. He is still living on the old homestead, and now owns 226 acres of good land. He was married Oct. 12, 1875, to Anna E. Dalzell, in Philadelphia, a daughter of David and Marietta Dalzell, the former a native of New Jersey, and the latter of Philadelphia. They are the parents of four children: Harriet M., David, Orville G., and Olanas O. Mr. Snekeker is a member of the I.O.O.F. lodge No. 53, and of the K. of P. No. 20, and with his wife is a member of the Baptist church. He is a genial, whole-souled gentleman, and has the respect of the community in which he lives, to a marked degree.
     The Edgar family, from which Col. William H. Edgar is descended, emigrated from Scotland more than 200 years ago, and settled on the Rahway river in New Jersey, on a homestead which is still in the family name. William S., a native of Philadelphia, Penn., was born on Dec. 22, 1816, son of Alexander A. Edgar and Sarah Elizabeth, nee Crowell, both of whom were natives of Essex county, N.J., and consistent members of the Society of Friends. In 1833, moving to the west, they settled in St. Clair county, Ill. The son had enjoyed good educational privileges in his native place, and on his removal to the west with his family, was sent to Marion College, Missouri, an institution noted for its strong anti-slavery principles. After two years of close application, his health becoming impaired, he closed his studies and for a time engaged in teaching. His early tastes had led him to choose the medical profession, and at the close of his engagement he began to study medicine in the office of Drs. White & Tiffin at St. Louis. After one year spent in blistering, bleeding, cupping and leeching, as was then the custom, he returned to Marion College, with improved health, intending to complete the full course of study. Before he graduated, however, the slavery agitation became so strong, and popular opinion so opposed the school, that it was obliged to close up. One incident will serve to illustrate the state of the public mind on one occasion. When Rev. Dr. Nelson, president of the college, was officiating at a camp meeting, a Mr. Muldron handed him, to read, a notice of an anti-slavery meeting. A noted pro-slavery man, Dr. Bosley, of Palmyra, had threatened to kill the first man who should read another notice of that character, and, true to his word, rushed upon Dr. Nelson with an uplifted sword-cane. Muldron, who observed the movement, sprang in from of him and received the blow intended for Nelson, drawing and exposing the glittering blade; at the same time drawing a jack-knife he stabbed Bosley in the chest, inflicting a wound from which he recovered only after a long period of intense suffering. Muldron was tried and acquitted. After leaving this institution Mr. Edgar entered the medical department of Kemper College, now Missouri Medical College, and graduated from the same in the spring of 1842. After pursuing his profession in Collinsville, Ill. for a few years, he went to St. Louis and remained until 1853, and at that time moved to Jacksonville, Ill. in order to give his family the advantage of its superior educational facilities. At the opening of the war in 1861, his sympathies were at once enlisted in the Union cause, and after several months of efficient service in mustering troops for the service, and awakening a spirit of patriotism, he was on Sept. 1, 1861 commissioned surgeon of the 32nd Ill. Inf. His first service was at Fort Donelson, connected with which are some most interesting incidents. On leaving the transport at Fort Henry he observed a family group, consisting of the father (colonel of an Ill. Reg.), his wife and two small children. After some earnest words with his wife, the colonel, with quick, nervous steps, left the boat, mounted his horse and galloped away. As the wife saw him vanish from sight, she uttered in a suppressed voice, “The last of my husband!” sank into a chair, and buried her face in her hands. Observing her mental agony, Dr. Edgar ventured a word of consolation, to which the lady replied, “You don’t know my husband,” and again buried her face. At the close of the first day at Fort Donelson, as the wounded were being gathered in, who can imagine the doctor’s emotion, upon entering a cabin, used as a temporary hospital, to find the dead body of the same Illinois colonel, shot through the forehead. Then did he comprehend the significance of the words, “You don’t know my husband.” Among the wounded under his charge here were Cols. John A. Logan and William R. Morrison. Logan’s wound seemed only sufficient to irritate and arouse him; he vowed that he would take command over the rebel works the next day. He consolingly assured Morrison that he would recover; that his wounds were just sufficient to send him to congress, and that his political fortune was made. Next day both were sore enough to keep quiet. On the morning after the severe fighting, the doctor went to Gen. Grant to ascertain some facts respecting the wounded under his care. The general was at breakfast, and seeing the doctor, said, “Go tell those wounded men the rebels have hung up the white flag in the fort. Go, doctor, and tell those poor fellows at once.” Hastening back he delivered his message, and at once there went up a shout for the old flag that made the woods resound. The news doubtless saved many a life, the object which the general had in view when he communicated it. After the battle of Shiloh, George Johnson, the rebel governor of Kentucky, was brought on the boat a wounded prisoner. He was shot through the bladder, and when told by the doctor that the wound was fatal, he said, “We have fought for constitutional liberty, and all is lost.” He died during the night. From the west Dr. Edgar accompanied General Sherman’s army on the Atlanta expedition to Atlanta. By the early date of his commission, he ranked the surgeons of his division, and during most of the war acted as surgeon-in-chief of the 4th Div., 17th A. C. After the fall of Atlanta, he was ordered by the army medical director to the hospital at Cairo, Ill., where he served until the close of the war, and was mustered out after four years’ active service, having made for himself a most worthy record. Returning to his home in Jacksonville, he resumed his practice, but soon found that the country practice was more than his impaired health could endure, and accordingly, in 1869, moved to St. Louis, and there engaged in his profession. In 1872 he became editor of the St. Louis “Medical and Surgical Journal,” and in 1873 was duly elected vice-president of the Medical Editor’s Association fo the United States, and in the following year president of the same. In his religious communion, Dr. Edgar was formerly connected with the Presbyterian church, but in later years embraced Unitarian views. He was married Nov. 1, 1839, in Burlington, Ia., to Lavania Phelps James, daughter of Judge William James, of Livingston county, N.Y., and by her has four sons and one daughter. His eldest son, William Henry, graduated from Jacksonville college in 1861, and served, with rank of lieutenant, in the 32nd Ill. Another son, Charles, enlisted in the same regiment, and was afterward made an assistant surgeon. Edward, a third son, accompanied his father, and assisted him in the care of the sick and wounded in the Atlanta campaign. At this time he is employed as clerk in the Continental Bank, St. Louis. His youngest son, Frank, is of the firm of Edgar, Whitehead & Vanderbort, dry goods merchants of Jerseyville, Ill.
     Robert T. Brock, son of Tarlton F. Brock, was born Dec. 31, 1827 in the present limits of Greene county, an moved with his parents to Otter Creek Prairie, now in Jersey county, in 1829. He attended school in the neighborhood, and also the “Stone school house,” and a course through Jones’ Commercial College, of St. Louis, Mo. in 1850, which finished his school education. He was married to Mary Jane, daughter of the late Dr. Isaac N. Piggott in 1855. He was a merchant at Grafton during 1856, 1857 and 1858, and moved to St. Louis in 1859. He was secretary of the war relief committee of St. Louis, Mo., during the late war, and was elected to the general assembly of Missouri from the city of St. Louis for 1867 and 1868. He was collector of water rates for the city of St. Louis for four years. He was a clerk in the registered letter and money order department of the St. Louis postoffice for two years. He moved back to Jersey county in 1874, and to Jerseyville in 1875, where he is now engaged in the real estate and conveyancing business, and is a notary public and abstracter of land titles.
     Frederick S. Davenport, a native of Nottingham, England, was born Feb. 17, 1825, being the eldest of the six children of Edwin C. and Elizabeth (Palmer) Davenport. Edwin C. Davenport was educated for the ministry, but afterwards engaged in the manufacture of lace. When the subject of this sketch was six years old, his parents moved to France, and he resided two years at Calais, three years at Caen, and nine years at Rouen, remaining in that country until 20 years of age, there receiving his education. When he was about 14 years old, an English company commenced the construction of a railroad between Paris and Rouen. For this company, Frederick acted as interpreter between the English and French, and being naturally apt, and possessed of much mechanical ingenuity, he became interested in engineering, of which he made a study. At the age of 20 years he returned to England, locating in London, where he served a wealthy ship-building firm, as machinist and draughtsman until 1857. At that date he immigrated to America an came soon after to Jerseyville, where his brother, Lancelot, had previously settled. Here he found work in his line somewhat scarce, but he put up engines and machinery in various mills, succeeding thus, by the exercise of strict economy, in making a living. In 1864, David Beaty, a prominent farmer of this county, brought to him for repairs, a gang plow, a rudely constructed affair, which was manufactured in Kentucky. Mr. Davenport immediately set to work to make improvements on the same, and in the autumn of the same year, took out his first patent for a riding gang-plow. The next patent granted him was on a device for indicating low water in steam boilers. He has since patented a Diamond mill-stone dresser, and also a wind power, for operating farm pumps, a number of other useful and ingenious contrivances; having been granted altogether thirteen patents, several of which are on plows. He has realized some money on each of his inventions, but his greatest success has been his latest patent, the “F. S. Davenport New Model Plow,” which he sold to the Jerseyville manufacturing company for $8,000. He has, during the last 17 years, connected with his other pursuits, that of solicitor of patents, and so conducts all of his own cases, as well as many for other parties. He has for many years, been deeply interested in astronomy and made a study of optical instruments, and has constructed three telescopes, the last of which was completed in 1876. It is a six foot instrument, with a four inch object glass. He has in his possession, a fine turning lathe, which he made while in London, doing all of the work on it after eight p.m. He has also a large collection of electrical, chemical and philosophical apparatus, the work of his own hands, and unique in structure, which has occupie, for its production and elaboration, nearly all the spare time of many of the best years of his life. He has quite an extensive cabinet of geological and entomological specimens, also a fine scientific and general library. He is a deep thinker and profound reasoner as well as a mechanical genius. He was married July 15, 1847 in London, England to Mary Lockley. They had two children, one of whom died in infancy, and one, Ada, is living. Mr. Davenport has never connected himself with any church or society. He is a man who takes much pride in having a pleasant home and is always ready to spend money freely for anything to add to home comfort, but never lives beyond his income, and rejoices in the consciousness that whatever he has achieved or acquired, is the fruit of an industrious an frugal life.
     Prentiss D. Cheney was born in Chautauqua county, N.Y., Aug. 2, 1836, and was six weeks old when the family started for Jersey county. On their arrival here he was three months old, the journey having occupied six weeks. He was brought up in this county, receiving his education under the tuition of Penuel Corbett. In 1851 he entered the recorder’s office of Jersey county, where he was employed in writing two years. He then clerked for a time in the general store of Alex. B. Morean. In 1854, when A. M. Blackburn established a bank, Mr. Cheney entered his employ. Three years later he went to Carlinville, where for two years he had charge of a bank for Chesnut & Blackburn. In 1859 he was married to Catharine M. D’Arcy, daughter of Dr. Edward A. D’Arcy, and returned to Jerseyville, where in partnership with Dr. D’Arcy he established the banking house of D’Arcy & Cheney, which continued until 1866. He then went to New York city and engaged in banking at No. 27 Wall street, being a member of the firm of Murray & Cheney. He continued in business there nearly three years, after which he returned to Jerseyville, where he has since dealt in real estate. Mrs. Cheney died in 1877, leaving two children, one of whom died within thirty days after the death of its mother. One son, Alexander, is now living. Mr. Cheney is a Knight Templar. He is now president of the Jersey county fair.
     William Embley, architect, is a native of Mercer county, N.J., born Dec. 25, 1826. His father, Joseph Embley, was also born in New Jersey, and was by trade a contractor and builder, but in later years settled on a farm. His mother, Nancy (Mount) Embley, was born in the same state. William Embley, in early life, became familiar with the carpenter trade, and soon applied himself to the study of architecture, becoming well versed in that science. In 1848 he was united in marriage with Mary E. Prime. Six years later he moved to Illinois and settled at Jerseyville, several of his friends having previously located here. Mr. Embley engaged here, in contracting and building, and the study of architecture. The latter business gradually increased until in 1865 he abandoned contracting and devoted his attention entirely to architecture. Specimens of his work may be seen from the Atlantic coast, westward to Denver, Col. Nearly all of the best buildings in Jersey and adjoining counties were planned by him, and testify to his skill and good taste. He has the plan for the new Jersey county court house, now complete. Mr. and Mrs. Embley have had six children, of whom the eldest three died with scarlet fever, soon after they moved to Jerseyville. The three now living are: William Franklin, Augustus Newell, and Alta Leaha. Mr. Embley has always acted with the democratic party, and although he has no time to devote to politics, he has frequently been chosen by his fellow-citizens to serve them in local office. He is a Knight Templar in the Masonic fraternity.
     James H. Wedding, deceased, a pioneer of 1834, was born in the District of Columbia in 1783. His parents were of English stock, but American born. He received a good education, being particularly well versed in navigation and surveying. He was united in marriage with Nancy Masters, also a native of the District of Columbia. He was one of minute men during the war of 1812, and was called out at the battle when the British took Washington. In 1814 he moved to Scioto county, O., where he followed farming, and from where he moved to Jersey county in 1834. He first stopped at Grafton, then resided two seasons on a farm near Jerseyville. In the meantime his son Thomas Wedding came to Jersey county in 1835 and entered land on the Illinois river bottom, in what is now Rosedale township, and Mr. Wedding went there to live with him. His death occurred in 1837 and that of Mrs. Wedding in 1841. They had a family of eight children, of whom Thomas, the oldest, and Benjamin, the youngest, are the only ones living. Mrs. Wedding was a devoted christian woman and a consistent member of the M.E. church.
     Capt. Oliver Marston, deceased, came to Jersey county in 1842, and settled on a farm in Piasa township, where he engaged in farming until his death, which occurred in 1856. Capt. Marston was born in the town of Marston Mills, Cape Cod, Mass. in 1804. At an early age he became a sailor, and for 27 years followed a seafaring life. He was for a number of years captain of a vessel. He was married in Philadelphia, Penn. to Elizabeth Powers, July 22, 1826, who survived him in life, her death occurring in 1879. They reared eight children, two of whom are now living. Two died in infancy in Philadelphia. Four lived to maturity an died in Jersey county; and two, Joseph G. and Samuel T. are now living in this county. Capt. Marston was made an Odd Fellow in 1832, joining Washington lodge No. 2, of Philadelphia. He continued a member of that organization during the remainder of his life. Politically he was a supporter of the whig party. He was a Universalist in religion, his wife being of Quaker faith.
     Ambrose S. Wyckoff was the first of this name who settled within the present limits of Jersey county, locating in 1832 in what is now Mississippi township. The following year he was joined here by his wife and children, and continued to reside here until his death, which occurred in 1872. His first wife was formerly Elizabeth Hamner, of New York. She died in 1837, leaving two children, one of whom is still living, John J., who now resides at Virden, Macoupin county, Ill. Mr. Wyckoff was afterward married to Sarah Gilder, and by this union had six children: William, Sherburne, Spencer, Ambrose B., Charles and Elizabeth. Mrs. Wyckoff is still living, and now resides with her son, Ambrose B., in Philadelphia. The latter is a lieutenant in the United States navy. Mr. Wyckoff was a successful farmer, and at his death owned 400 acres of land. The father of Ambrose S. Wyckoff was a native of New Jersey, was born Sept. 1767, and came here in 1835. He was by occupation a farmer, married in his native state to Jennie Barkley, and there remainded until coming here. He died in this county in 1842, and Mrs. Wyckoff in 1857. They had a family of six children: John; Polly B., wife of Elijah Van Horne; Nathan; Catherine S., wife of Dr. A. R. Knapp; Ambrose S. and Samuel B.
     Rev. Samuel Lynn, deceased, was born in East Tennessee in August 1803. He was educated for the ministry, and at an early age was ordained as a Presbyterian minister. For six years he was located at Springfield, Ky., for 10 years at Newport, and for the same length of time at Richwood, Ky. In 1857 he came to Jerseyville and took charge of the 2nd Presbyterian church, remaining in charge to the date of his death in 1872. He was united in marriage in Cincinnati, O., with Frances W. Wilson, who still survives him, and is yet a resident of Jerseyville. Mr. and Mrs. Lynn were the parents of eight children, three of whom are now living: Sarah, William H. and Amanda.
     Rev. Geo. Ives King was born in Adams, N.Y., June 1, 1815, of New England parentage. From his grandmother, King, who was a remarkable Bible student, and a Presbyterian, he received the greater part of his religious training. He prepared for college at Lowville, N.Y., and graduated from Union College in 1838. He studied theology at Auburn Seminary. He was licensed by the Presbytery of Columbia at Hudson, N.Y. in April 1840. He was married to Emily b. Sprague, Oct. 12, 1840, and died March 12, 1873. He was installed as pastor of the First Presbyterian church, Jerseyville, in 1868, which was his last charge.
     John Fox was born near Leeds, Yorkshire, Eng., June 7, 1824. When he was but six months old, his father, also John Fox, was killed in a mill. His mother was subsequently married to Dennis Cockshott. The subject of this sketch grew to manhood in his native country, where in his youth he learned the milling trade in the same mill in which his father was killed. In 1854, accompanied by his half brother, Spencer Cockshott, he immigrated to the United States and came directly to Jerseyville, where they were joined one year later by their mother and sister. Here Mrs. Cockshott died in September 1855. Mr. Fox soon after moved to Grafton and went ot work in the flouring mills where he continued fourteen or fifteen years. He then returned to Jerseyville, and has since been retired from active life, having accumulated a fortune sufficient for comfort during his later years. Mr. Fox was married in 1877 to Mrs. Kate c. Marsh nee Richards. She had by her former marriage two sons, John T. and Stewart C. Mr. and Mrs. Fox have one son, Marmaduke. Mr. Fox is a member of the Episcopal church and his wife is a Baptist. He is politically a democrat and has served several years in the city council.
     John Wyckoff, eldest son of John and Jennie Wyckoff, was born New Jersey, July 31, 1790. He moved with his parents to Schoharie county, N.Y. and was reared on a farm. In 1809 he was married to Eleanor Gray, who was born in Dutchess county, N.Y. After marriage he continued to reside in New York until 1835. At that date he came to Illinois and settled in Jersey county, where he died in 1840. Mrs. Wyckoff survived him until 1871. They were the parents of ten children, only two of whom are living, David G. and Elizabeth. Those deceased are: John, Nathan, Solomon, Theodore, Franklin, Charles, Augustus and James B.
     George H. Jackson, son of George H. Jackson, Sr., was born in Jerseyville in Sept. 1860. His early life was spent here, where he has always resided. He obtained his education in the Jerseyville schools, but on account of ill health, he was compelled to abandon his studies before they were fully completed. He learned the tinner’s trade, but his health would not permit him to follow that occupation. He then tried railroading, but was unable to continue it. When his father was taken sick and died, he succeeded him, and now carries on the same business in the city of Jerseyville, abstracting titles, etc.
     George W. Burke, an early settler and prominent citizen of Jersey county, was born in Addison county, Vt., Nov. 28, 1807, being the third child of Seth and Anna Burke, natives of Massachusetts, who moved with their parents at an early day to Vermont. The grandfather of the subject of this sketch, also Seth Burke, was a veteran of the Revolutionary war, and one of the martyrs of that struggle for liberty, as he died soon after the close of the war, from disease contracted while in the service. His father participated in the war of 1812. He (Seth) followed the occupation of farming through life. He had a family of seven children, three sons and four daughters, all except one attaining mature years, and four are yet living. He died in the 70th year of his age, and his wife in her 84th year. Seth Burke was a man distinguished for energy and moral worth. George W. received his early education in Onondaga county, N.Y., where his father died. He learned the blacksmith trade in that county and followed that occupation. He was first married Dec. 26, 1836 to Sarah M. Barber, who died in Jersey county, July 21, 1851. He was again married Jan. 19. 1854 to Mrs. Elizabeth Searl, widow of Russell Searl, of Southhampton, Mass. Mr. Burke came to Illinois in the fall of 1834 and entered land on which he now lives, the next spring after his arrival. There were at that time only four families in Jerseyville. During the first year of his residence here Mr. Burke followed blacksmithing, but later engaged in farming; also devoted much time to the improvement of his city property, and to city improvements generally. He laid out the first addition to the city of Jerseyville in 1840, and the second in 1858. Politically he was a whig, from christian principle an abolitionist, and as such took his stand for the right. When Rev. E. P. Lovejoy was murdered in Alton in 1837, Mr. Burke, with a few others, stood to the same principles for which Lovejoy suffered martyrdom, enduring reproach and obloquy heaped on the early abolitionists. At the present time, when slavery is unknown through the length and breadth of this fair land, one of his most pleasing memories is that which recalls the bold and fearless stand which he then took in regard to slavery. His first church connection here was with the Congregational church, of which he was one of the deacons, and is now the only original member left. That church was formed as a protest against the pro-slavery proclivities of the Presbyterian church, and had an existence of about six years only. He then became connected with the Congregational church at Chesterfield, Macoupin county, Ill., with which he retained membership until after the war, when he united with the Presbyterian church of Jerseyville, of which he is now a member. He lives on a tract of 40 acres, within the limits of Jerseyville. The remainder, three forties, of his original homestead he has platted and sold in town lots. He owns a farm of 180 acres in Jersey township, eight miles out of the city, also a farm in Christian county. As an enterprising and public spirited citizen, Mr. Burke is well known in this community where he has spent more than 50 years of his active and busy life, and is highly esteemed for his many excellent qualities, throughout the entire county.
     C. B. Eaton settled at Grafton, Jersey county, in 1863. He is a native of North Hampton, Mass., born Nov. 13, 1817, and a descendant of the seventh generation, from Francis Eaton, who came over in the Mayflower. His parents were Ebenezer and Mary (Stuart) Eaton, the latter a descendant, on her mother’s side, of Governor Mayhew of Martha’s Vineyard. Ebenezer Eaton was by trade a contractor and builder. The subject of this sketch was educated in a private school, and at the age of 14 years began mercantile life as clerk in a general store, in the town of Phelps, Ontario county, N.Y., near where the family had located the year previous. Here, in 1838, Mr. Eaton was married to Catherine Root, a native of Phelps, Ontario county. After marriage he engaged in the dry goods business, and later in the manufacture of edge tools, continuing the latter until 1849. In 1854 he moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he operated a distillery four years. He then entered the employ of the C. & M. R. R. Co., connected with B. & O. R. R. Co., as stock agent, continuing that occupation until the breaking out of the civil war. He assisted in shipping to Washington the first beef cattle for the supply of the army. The railroad became partially destroyed, and Mr. Eaton again engaged in running a distillery, and dealing in live stock at Cincinnati, which business he followed until 1863, when as before stated he came to Illinois and settled in Jersey county. He engaged in a distillery at Grafton two years, then abandoned it and was appointed the St. Louis agent for the stone quarries at that point. He afterward engaged in farming and stock dealing in Rosedale township, and now owns a farm there. Mr. and Mrs. Eaton had eight children born to them: E. P., now in Mississippi; George M., of the firm of Eaton & Crawford, of Jerseyville; Charles B., in Vicksburg, Miss.; Frank S., living in Quincy, Ill.; Alice, wife of James M. Allen, of Grafton; Elizabeth, wife of C. J. Slaten, of Grafton; and Beulah C., wife of A. H. Barrett, of Jerseyville. Mrs. Eaton died September 14, 1884, and her remains were taken to Cincinnati for burial. Mr. Eaton holds the office of justice of the peace at Jerseyville, and he served two years as county supervisor from Rosedale township. He is a Royal Arch Mason and politically a democrat.
     Frederick Bertman, deceased, was born in Prussia, May 17, 1821. He came to the United States in 1845, and about three years later located in Alton, Ill., where he resided one year, and then came to Jerseyville and opened a tailoring establishment. He remained here engaged in the clothing and dry goods business until his decease. He was married in 1846 to Helena Goetten, of New York. Seven children were born to them: Setta, now the wife of J. B. Eck, of Dubuque, Ia.; Minnie, wife of Lewis Casavant, of Jerseyville; John F.; Mary, wife of William Figgen, of Quincy; Frederick J.; Nellie, wife of Heber Porter; and William A. Frederic Bertman died August 25, 1882, his death being caused by gangrene of the lungs. He had for several years been subject to a cough, and during the last year of his life was afflicted with a carbuncle on is neck, causing a severe drain on his system, and although his cough ceased for the time being, it returned with redoubled severity on the healing of the abscess, and continued until gangrene set in. A few days previous to his decease, realizing his condition, he declared his willingness to go. He was a man having many friends and few enemies, a kind, loving husband, an indulgent father and a good citizen. He was a great lover of music and thoroughly understood the principles of that science. He was at one time a member of the Jerseyville band. He was elected to the office of councilman, which he held one term. By industry and energy he accumulated a competency, which he left to his wife, trusting her to provide for the interests of their children. His funeral took place from the Catholic church, high mass being held by Rev. Father Harty, and was largely attende by his many friends and relatives.
     Harley E. Hayes is one of the early settlers of Jersey county, having come here in 1833 from Addison county, Vt., his native place. He drove a team through from that place, for his brother-in-law, Samuel Day. Mr. Hayes was born March 14, 1813, and was 20 years of age when he came here. Samuel Day settled four miles south of the present site of Jerseyville on section 9, T7 north, R11 west, and engaged in farming. Mr. Hayes made his homehere, but was engaged in various employments. He made a trip to New Orleans, and was for some time employed in Alton. Dec. 19, 1837, he was united in marriage with Mary Ann day, daughter of Samuel and Maria (Spencer) Day. She was also a native of Addison county, Vt. After marriage Mr. Hayes purchased 80 acres of unimproved land, built a cabin and commenced housekeeping. In 1848 he sold his original 80 and purchased 120 acres in the same (Mississippi) township. This land was partially improved, but had no buildings on it. In 1861 he again sold his farm and bought 160 acres, all improved, in the same township. Here he built good frame buildings and followed farming until 1866. Mrs. Hayes died in 1862, leaving one son, now a farmer of Clay county, Neb. In 1864 Mr. Hayes married Mary Ann Graves, nee Austin, who was born near Watertown, N.Y. In 1866 he sold his farm and moved to Jerseyville. In 1867 he was appointed assistant United States assessor, and served three years, but not liking the business, tendered his resignation, which was finally accepted. Since then he has been retired from active business. Mr. Hayes’ parents were Elam and Rachel (Knickerbocker) Hayes, natives of Connecticut, but of English and German descent. They were the parents of four children: Harman B. and Harvey D., now living in Macoupin county, and Emoretta and Harley E.
     William B. Nevius, son of John and Maggie (Baird) Nevius, was born in Somerset county, N.J., Nov. 2, 1813. He grew to manhood in his native state, and in his youth learned the wagon-maker’s trade, which he followed until 1837 in New Jersey. In that year he came to Illinois and settled in Jerseyville, Jersey county, thus becoming one of the pioneers. He followed his trade here until 1851, when he went to Lee county, Ia. and engaged in farming. He remained there 18 months, then sold out and returned to Jerseyville and went into the milling business. In 1858 he sold his mill and engaged in general mercantile trade on the corner now occupied by the First National Bank, becoming a member of the firm of Knapp & Nevius. This partnership continued five years. In 1865 he purchased an interest in the Jerseyville mills, and continued a partner in the same until the mills was destroyed by fire, since which he has been retired from active business. Mr. Nevius was for many years an energetic and enterprising business man, and has been generally successful. He was married in 1841 to Laura A. Goodrich, daughter of C. H. Goodrich. They are the parents of three children: Henry, a merchant of Jerseyville; Mary, wife of S. A. Holmes, of Morehead, Minn.; and Hattie A., who died at the age of 20 years. Mr. Nevius is a man of very decided convictions. He is a republican in politics, formerly a whig, and has held local office. He is a Free Mason, and a member of the First Presbyterian church. He is a public-spirited man, always taking an active part in all worthy public improvements, and has many friends.
     Henry Nevius, son of William B. and Laura A. Nevius, was born in Jerseyville, July 7, 1842, and here grew to manhood. In 1862 he enlisted in Co. C., 61st Ill. Inf., and served until the close of the war, participating in all of the engagements of his company. He then returned to Jerseyville and engaged as clerk in a dry goods store, also worked in his father’s mill. In 1868 he went to the Rocky mountains and remained there three years, during which time he was wagon-master of a government train one year, and drove a team one year. Then, after traveling over several states and territories, returned to Jerseyville and engaged in the milling business with his father. In 1876 when the mill was destroyed by fire, he was appointed deputy sheriff and collector, under J. M. Young and served four years. In Feb. 1880 Mr. Nevius, in partnership with William Hall, succeeded Travis & Gillham in the grocery business, the firm becoming Hall & Nevius. This partnership continued until Feb. 1885, when Mr. Nevius became sole proprietor. He carried a full and complete stock of groceries, provisions, queensware, glass, paints, oils, etc. He was married in 1879 to Miss G. A. Nott, of Jerseyville, daughter of S. B. Nott, an early settler of Fieldon. They have one child, Laura A. Mr. Nevius has been a member of the city council several years, and has also served as city clerk and treasurer, and as a member of the board of education. He is politically a democrat, a member of the Knights of Pythias, the I.O.O.F., and a Royal Arch Mason.
     H. O. Goodrich, a prominent early settler of Jerseyville, was born in Delaware county, N.Y., Oct. 3, 1819. He is the youngest of a family of three children of C. H. and Lydia A. Goodrich, who were also early settlers of this state, having come to Greene county in 1839, and soon after to Jersey. Their ancestors were English, French and Scotch. C. H. Goodrich was for eight years state’s attorney for the first judicial circuit, being at that time one of the prominent lawyers of this portion of the state. He was a gentleman of polished education and in every way fitted to adorn the legal arena in which he moved as a practitioner. He died at his residence in Jerseyville in 1868.
     H. O. Goodrich, the subject of this sketch, received his early education in the Genesee, N.Y. high school, obtaining a good knowledge of the English branches. He attended school until the age of 18, soon after which he became an apprentice to learn the harness-maker’s trade. He subsequently went to Towanda, Penn., and there resided about one year and a half, then came west, arriving in this county in 1840 with 75 cents capital with which to commence his western life. His first employment was working at his trade in Carrollton, though in the fall fo the same year he opened a shop in Jerseyville and there continued in that business until 1846. In that year he engaged in partnership with C. H. Knapp in mercantile business, which he continued about 11 years. On June 21, 1847 he was married to Jane Amelia Knapp, daughter of Dr. A. R. Knapp. They had born to them three children: Adams A., Kitty and Carrie Bell. In 1857 he built a large mill and distillery at Jersey Landing, which he operated in partnership with A. L. Knapp until 1859. In April 1862 he went with the 61st Ill. Inf. as sutler, in which capacity he accumulated considerable money. He spent three years in the army, then returned to Jerseyville and engaged quite extensively in the milling business, which he continued until 1876, when one of the mills was destroyed by fire, and the other was likewise burned up in 1879. In addition to other business interests Mr. Gardner was agent for the McCormick machines for a period of 28 years for southern Illinois. [It is unclear if the Mr. Gardner is actually meant to be Mr. Goodrich] In 1881 he went to Fargo, Dak. and while there was persuaded by his friends to purchase land, and with Zina Dota, of New York city, purchased 960 acres of land, also some property in Fargo. His land there is now all under cultivation and is managed by a foreman employed for its care. This land in 1884 produced 18.000 bushels of wheat, besides other grain. He has been twice elected mayor of the city, and was one of the first trustees after its incorporation. He was also one of the original workers in bringing about the organization of the Jersey County Agricultural Society, of which in Nov. 1871 he was elected president. Poltitcally in early life Mr. Goodrich was a whig, but afterward joined the democratic party, to which he has since given his earnest support. He came to this county a poor man, and has by his own efforts gained a competence and a high and honorable position in society. Few men of southern Illinois have so extensive a business acquaintance as Mr. Goodrich, who by the liberality and integrity of his dealings, has won the approbation of all.
     William R. Seago is a native of Jersey county, born Sept. 9, 1843. His parents, John and Mary A. (Campbell) Seago, were born in North Carolina, and immigrated to Illinois at an early day, locating in Jersey township. In 1869 Jno. Seago went to Tennessee on a visit for his health and there died, Dec. 3, 1869. His wife died Dec. 3, 1879. William was brought up on his father’s farm until he was 21 years of age. Dec. 7, 1865 he was married to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Campbell, nee Melton, daughter of Wyley and Rebecca Melton, old settlers of Greene county. They have had five children: Judith, Adolphus, Olive, Sylvester and Cyrus; Olive is deceased. Her death occurred April 3, 1874. In 1870 he purchased a small tract of land in Richwoods township, and four years later he bought 120 acres more. He afterward bought 160 acres, all in the same township, and continued to reside there until the fall of 1880, when he moved to Jerseyville. The second spring he engaged in the butchering business, which he followed three years. In 1882 he bought 18 acres of land in Jerseyville with a good residence on it. In 1874 he was elected justice of the peace, and held that office until his removal to Jerseyville. Mr. Seago was a member of the I.O.O.F. lodge of Fieldon until its charter was withdrawn, since which he has been unconnected with that organization. He is a democrat politically.
     Frank P. Henderson, son of Richmond and Mary A. (Douglas) Henderson, was born in Jersey county, Ill. in 1857. He was reared to agricultural pursuits, and attended the schools of Jerseyville, completing his education at McKendree College. He was married Oct. 25, 1877 to Nannie Cadwalader, a native of Fulton county, Ill. They have one child, Addie M. Mr. Henderson has a farm in Jersey township on which he resides. He owns also 700 acres of land in Stone county, Mo. He is a member of the Anti-Horse-Thief Society, and has served three years as road commissioner of this township.
     Abram Remer, wagon manufacturer in Jerseyville, was born in Somerville, N.J., March 6, 1811. He served an apprenticeship to the trade of wagon-making, and followed that business in his native town until 1856, when he came to Illinois and settled in Jerseyville, where he has since resided and pursued his trade. He was married March 18, 1837 to Deborah Nutt, who was a native of the city of Philadelphia, born March 6, 1813. Her father was Thomas Nutt, a farmer by occupation. They have had seven children, five of whom are now living: George M.; Hannah Augusta, now the wife of John Van Pelt; Theodore F.; Henrietta, now Mrs. Henrietta Rockwell; and Sarah M., wife of J. M. Page. Mr. and Mrs. Remer are members of the First Presbyterian church.
     Joseph S. Malotte was born in Platte City, Mo., July 26, 1843, son of John s. and Elizabeth H. Malotte. John S. Malotte was born in France, and was among the early French settlers of the state of Missouri where he died. On the death of his father, Joseph S. went to live with his sister in Pennsylvania, where he received his education and remained until he was age 18. In the spring of 1860 he came to Jerseyville, Ill., and here clerked in the clothing store of J. C. Tack until Dec. 1863, when he enlisted in Co. C., 124th Ill. Inf., and served until the close of the war. He returned from the army to Jerseyville an engaged in clerking until 1869. He then became the partner of H. V. Voorhees in the grocery trade, which they carried on about two years. At the expiration of that time Mr. Malotte purchased his partner’s interest and continued the business until his store was destroyed by fire. He then engaged in building and selling residence property and has done much to improve the west part of the city where he has erected five of the best dwellings in that part of the town. Sept. 18, 1867 he married Maria A. Tack, daughter of John c. and Henrietta (Miller) Tack. Two children have been born to them, Frank and Walter. Mr. Malotte is a member of the G.A.R. and politically a suporter of the republican party.
     James W. Calhoun was born in Lyman, Grafton county, N.H., Oct. 19, 1824, and came with his parents, Solomon and Rhoda Calhoun, to this county in 1833. He followed farming, and in 1849 was married to Lucinda Robbins, nee Crowell. He continued to reside on the farm until 1870, when on account of the feeble health of his wife, he moved to Jerseyville, and has since been clerking most of the time. Mr. and Mrs. Calhoun have one child, Emily L., wife of W. Leigh, who resides at Jerseyville.
     Patrick Dunphy came to Jerseyville in 1865 and at first worked on a farm for Hugh N. Cross. He then established a grocery business in Jerseyville which he continued until 1877, when he engaged in the saloon business. In 1884 he erected his present building, a brick structure 26 x 80 feet and two stories in height. Patrick Dunphy was born in county Tipperary, Ireland, March 9, 1844. In 1862 his father died, and the same year his mother came to America accompanied by three children, four children having preceded her. Six of the family are still living. The mother died in Jerseyville in 1871. When Patrick first came to the United States he worked on a farm in Wisconsin, after which he was in the employ of the government at Nashville, Tenn. until 1865. In Februay 1867 he was married to Mary Dwyer, of Jerseyville, but a native of Ireland. Six children have been born to them, one of whom died in the third year of his age. Those now living are: Annie, John, Maggie, Katie and Nellie. Mr. Dunphy is a democrat in politics and a member of the Catholic church.
     Charles Neumeyer was born in Arnsberg [?], Westphalia, Prussia, Germany, Oct. 5, 1849. He remained in his native country until 1867, there receiving a good education. He then came to the United States, and first stopped with his uncle, Louis Poettger, a farmer near Jerseyville. In 1869 he came to Jerseyville and served as bartender for P. Leresche, which firm he succeeded in busines in 1875, and still continues the same. In Jan. 1872 he was married to Anna Seehausen, then of Fieldon, Jersey county, but a native of Germany. She is a daughter of J. C. Seehausen. Mr. and Mrs. Neumeyer have one daughter, Julia. He is a member of the German Lutheran church, of which he is secretary, and a democrat.
     William McAdams, Sr., deceased, was born in Middletown, Butler county, O., April 25, 1809, his parents being Thomas and Elizabeth McAdams. Thos. McAdams was a native of Scotland, and when 16 years of age he immigrated to this country and settled in Philadelphia. In 1798 he was married to Elizabeth Noble, daughter of James and Rebecca Noble, natives of Pennsylvania. By this union there were eight children, four sons and four daughters. Mr. McAdams enlisted in the war of 1812 as a volunteer, and was taken prisoner at Detroit. His occupation through life was farming. In 1833 he died and his wife survived him until the spring of 1836. William, the subject of this sketch, was educated in the common schools of his native state, and on Nov. 6, 1831 married Eliza Farris, oldest child of Joseph and Nancy Farris, whose ancestral descent was Scotch and Irish, and who were among the early settlers of Ohio. This union was blessed with nine children, four sons and five daughters, sox of whom are still living: William Jr., of Alton; Mary Jane, wife of John Anten, of Alton; Charles A., a physician at Wichita, Kas.; Lewis Y., of Whitehall; Eleanora and Anna. Mr. McAdams began life as a carpenter but soon changed from that to the mercantile business, he followed about 20 years, or until 1850 when he engaged in agricultural pursuits, in which he continued until his sad and sudden death. In the fall of 1857 he immigrated to Illinois and settled one mile southwest of Jerseyville, where he remained until the spring of 1864, when he removed to the farm near Otterville, where he ever afterwards resided. He died very suddenly July 23, 1885, being taken away with heart disease. But a day or two before he was pleasantly greeting acquaintances in the city. The high social and financial position he enjoyed was due to his amiability, untiring energy and good management. Any eulogy is unnecessary as his merits are so well known, his acquaintance being so extensive, and he was respected by the entire community as an upright, honorable and public-spirited citizen. He left his family in very comfortable circumstances, having 640 acres of valuable land, and a large, two-story brick residence in Otterville.

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